AFFILIATED GROUP SESSIONS

 

 

ARTS NOBLES ET ARTS POPULAIRES : CONTRIBUTION À UNE PÉDAGOGIE DE LA LANGUE ET DE LA CULTURE EN CLASSE DE FRANÇAIS

AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF TEACHERS OF FRENCH (AATF)

Dans le souci d’améliorer la didactique du français langue première ou  seconde, cette session de l’AATF ouvre une discussion sur la contribution de l’art noble et de l’art populaire comme moyen d’enseignement et  d’apprentissage en classe de français. Veuillez envoyer une proposition de 200 mots en français ou anglais accompagnée d’une brève notice bio-biographique au plus tard le 15 juin 2017 à  Martine Boumtje, meboumtje@saumag.edu

The AATF hosts a panel for the SAMLA 89 conference on the incorporation of High Art and Low Art into the French classroom. The panel opens a discussion on any pedagogical strategies for an effective teaching and learning of the French language and Francophone cultures through movies, music and theater or any other artistic practices.  By June 215, 2017, please submit a 200-word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Martine Boumtje at meboumtje@saumag.edu.

 

 

ASSOCIATION OF ADAPTATION STUDIES

For its sessions at the South Atlantic Modern Language Association, the Association of Adaptation Studies welcomes proposals on this year’s conference theme, as well as all aspects of adaptation, including novels, films, games, plays, operas, digital media, etc.). Of course, theoretical musings are also welcome. This year’s overall conference theme is HIGH ART/LOW ART: BORDERS & BOUNDARIES IN POPULAR CULTURE, suggesting everything from low-brow adaptations of high-brow works (A.I.P.’s Wuthering Heights) to the opposite (Hitchcock’s The Thirty-Nine Steps)—and everything in between, outside, and around.  As usual, our Association plans a series of interlinked adaptation panels. Please send queries and suggestions, or 300-500 word abstracts, A/V requirements, and brief bios to Dennis Perry (Brigham Young University) at dperry@byu.edu by June 1, 2017.

 

BORDERS AND BOUNDARIES IN POPULAR FRENCH CARIBBEAN CULTURE

WOMEN IN FRENCH

This panel welcomes papers focused on illustrations of borders and boundaries in popular culture in French Caribbean women’s writing or film. Papers may be in English or French and may not exceed 20 minutes. Please send 250-word abstracts and any A/V requests to Lisa Connell (lconnell@westga.edu) by May 15, 2017.

 

CARSON MCCULLERS' HIGH/LOW ARTISTIC INFLUENCES AND SUCCESSORS

THE CARSON MCCULLERS FOR WRITERS AND MUSICIANS IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE CARSON MCCULLERS SOCIETY

The Carson McCullers Center for Writers and Musicians (Columbus State University) in conjunction with The Carson McCullers Society invite papers relating to the work of Carson McCullers and the theme of High/Low Art: Borders and Boundaries in Popular Culture. Although we welcome papers that interpret the theme broadly, we especially encourage papers that focus on where, when, and how Carson McCullers references aspects of “high” or “low” art in her writing; or alternately, how more contemporary writers and artists have transformed or elaborated on the ideas of Carson McCullers.

Presentations about McCullers and her work that are not directly related to the conference theme are also welcome.

By June 1, 2017, please submit a 300-word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Alison Bertolini, Assistant Professor of English Literature, North Dakota State University, at alison.bertolini@ndsu.edu.

 

CHESNUTT'S ARTFUL LINES OF RACIAL BEING

CHARLES W. CHESNUTT SOCIETY

This panel welcomes abstracts addressing artful lines of racial being in the life and works of Charles W. Chesnutt. Abstracts attending to this year's conference theme are especially welcome. By June 2, please send a 300-word abstract, brief bio, and AV requirements to Darren Elzie, University of Memphis, at djelzie@memphis.edu.

 

CORMAC MCCARTHY AND POPULAR CULTURE

CORMAC MCCARTHY SOCIETY

Recent scholarship has made much of McCarthy's last two novels in terms of their connections to and reflections of popular culture. Various studies have examined No Country for Old Men in terms of the detective and crime genres and have viewed The Road through the lens of science fiction and post-apocalyptic formulas. In addition to these well-trod paths, the panel welcomes submissions considering the use of various kinds of popular culture in the author's Tennessee novels, in Blood Meridian and the Border Trilogy. In addition to considerations of forms of popular literature the panel also invites studies of the author's uses of other kinds of popular culture and folk lore, from music to tall tales to horror films to the western. Please submit a 350 word abstract (or any questions) by June 2, 2017, to Dr. Scott D. Yarbrough, Department of English, Charleston Southern University: syarbrou@csuniv.edu.

 

CULTURE/NATURE: ART AND THE ENVIRONMENT

ASSOCIATION FOR THE STUDY OF LITERATURE AND ENVIRONMENT (ASLE)

The distinction between high and low art often parallels the distinction between nature and culture. The Association for the Study of Literature and the Environment (ASLE) invites papers that interrogate the borders between high and low art along the lines of culture and nature. Considerations of the ways in which the "natural" becomes "cultured" through gardening, the decorative arts, and through other media, including literature, are particularly welcome. Please send a 250-word abstract and a description of your A/V needs to Kelly C. Walter Carney at kwaltercarney@methodist.edu by 1 June 2017.

 

D.H. LAWRENCE AND CULTURAL BOUNDARIES

D.H. LAWRENCE SOCIETY OF NORTH AMERICA

This panel welcomes papers about any aspect of D.H. Lawrence.  Especially welcome are paper proposals addressing the SAMLA 89 theme of High Art/Low Art: Borders and Boundaries in Popular Culture.  By June 1, please submit a 250-word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Adam Parkes, University of Georgia, at aparkes@uga.edu.

 

DICKINSON AND POP CULTURE

EMILY DICKINSON INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY

The Emily Dickinson International Society welcomes projects that explore Emily Dickinson and popular culture. Topics can include but are not limited to: cinematic or dramatic representations of Dickinson’s life and work; Dickinson and music; realities versus popular myths; pop culture references within Dickinson’s work; Dickinson’s reception in popular culture in the nineteenth, twentieth, or twenty-first century. Creative works are encouraged. By June 2, 2017, please submit a CV, 250-word project description, and A/V requirements to Dr. Trisha Kannan at tk1139@gmail.com.

 

ELIZABETH MADOX ROBERTS

ELIZABETH MADOX ROBERTS SOCIETY

The Elizabeth Madox Roberts society invites abstracts for our affiliate panel at the 89th annual conference of the South Atlantic Modern Language Association. Abstracts highlighting the theme of this year’s conference – High Art/Low Art: Borders and Boundaries in Popular Culture – in conjunction with Roberts’ life and works are of particular interest. By June 1, please send a 250-word abstract to Nicole Stamant, Agnes Scott College, at nstamant@agnesscott.edu.

 

FAILURE TO CONFORM: THE DEFIANT FEMALE BODY IN FRENCH AND FRANCOPHONE CULTURES

WOMEN IN FRENCH

This panel considers examples of French and francophone literatures, films, and other art forms, in which contemporary women articulate and/or embody nonconformist physicality which challenges social order. How do women speak against or otherwise resist socially defined borders and boundaries of normative corporeality? Presentations may address both thematic and formal examples of textual disruption that is enabled by bodies which run counter to socially constructed ideals related to women, gender, and race. Possible thematic avenues of inquiry include but are not limited to: pregnancy, aging, disability, beauty, and illness. Please send 250-word proposals in English or French to Adrienne Angelo (ama0002@auburn.edu) by May 15, 2017 along with presenter’s academic affiliation, contact information, and A/V requirements.

 

FLANNERY O'CONNOR AND LOW CULTURE

FLANNERY O'CONNOR SOCIETY

This panel on “Flannery O’Connor and Low Culture” for SAMLA 89 welcomes papers about any aspect of Flannery O’Connor’s works in relation to low, common, tacky, and/or popular culture. By 25 May 2017, please submit an abstract of 100+ words, a brief bio, and A/V requirements to Marshall Bruce Gentry, Georgia College, at bruce.gentry@gcsu.edu.

 

FROM TABLEUX VIVANT TO FLASH MOB: CULTURAL CONTINUUMS FROM EDITH WHARTON TO SPENCER TUNICK

EDITH WHARTON SOCIETY

The Edith Wharton Society invites proposals for a panel at the South Atlantic Modern Language Association Conference (SAMLA 89) to be held in Atlanta, Georgia, November 3-5, 2017.  The conference topic is High Art / Low Art: Borders and Boundaries in Popular Culture. 

Edith Wharton produced a range of cultural products, including canonical novels and short stories, fund-raising anthologies for wartime France, guides to interior design, and travel books. Current popular culture suggests a continuing interest in Wharton, her writings, and those decades that are the focus of her work. Julian Fellows, creator of Downton Abbey, admits that “It is quite true that Edith Wharton has been a tremendous influence on me. . . . I decided, largely because of her work, that it was time I wrote something.” On Wharton’s 150th birthday, Vogue magazine offered an 18-pages to celebrate, including photos by Annie Leibovitz. The Gossip Girl series draws on Whartonian inspiration.  What has driven the renewed attention being paid to the Edwardian and WWI eras in contemporary pop culture?

The Wharton society invites papers that explore a broad range of responses to how Wharton’s art contributes to a continuum of cultural inquiry and commentary that persists to this day in high / low cultural expressions. One might consider such topics as how modern flash mobs reflect or rewrite the tableau vivants of The House of Mirth. How do Wharton’s texts and practices reflect a generational difference (or not) in attitudes toward privacy in (social) media?  How might contemporary short forms or serializations (blog posts, film and music reviews, opinion pieces, etc.) draw on the form and content of her essays, cultural commentaries, letters, or short stories? Does Wharton's art bear narrative, formal, or thematic similarities to other forms of popular culture, such as soap operas or online TV dramas? Wharton’s travel writing about excursions via automobile might be compared to modern travel blogs, television programming, or websites.  We hope to receive a range of submissions to create lively, even surprising, insights and conversation.

Please submit a 300-500 word abstract, one page CV, and AV requirements via email to Mary Carney, University of North Georgia, at mary.carney@ung.edu by May 12, 2017. 

 

HAWTHORNE, ART, AND POPULAR CULTURE

NATHANIEL HAWTHORNE SOCIETY

This panel welcomes any papers about any Hawthorne, art, and pop culture and any intersection or interpretation of those topics. Paper proposals addressing the SAMLA 89 theme are especially welcome. By June 1, 2017, please submit a 300-word abstract, brief bio, and AV requirements to Steven Petersheim, Indiana University East, at spetersh@iue.edu.

 

HEMINGWAY'S PERIODICAL PRESENCES: ERNEST WRITES, ERNEST IS WRITTEN ABOUT

For SAMLA 2017, we seek papers exploring any aspect of Hemingway’s appearances in periodicals. Within this broad subject, we particularly encourage assessing both the “public man” and the Nobel Laureate in Hemingway’s last decade. Two Overarching Questions: (1) in July 1961 and the period immediately following, the periodical press did/did not recognize Hemingway as the polymath man-of-letters he strove to be: journalist, sportsman, insider, teacher, connoisseur, celebrity, artist; (2) centering our inquiry on his periodical presences [particularly in his last years] is valuable for Hemingway studies because…?

Helpful context for the final years, 1949-1961, occurs in the oft-cited Malcolm Cowley, “A Portrait of Mr. Papa,” Life, 1949, and Lillian Ross, “How Do You Like It Now, Gentlemen?” New Yorker, 1950.

Paper topics for this session may address the dual-sided nature of “Hemingway’s Periodical Presences: Ernest Writes, Ernest Is Written About.”  By 1 June 2017, please send a title and 250-word abstract to John Fenstermaker, Florida State University, jfenstermaker@fsu.edu.

 

HIGH ART AND LOW ART IN THE WORKS OF MARK TWAIN

THE MARK TWAIN CIRCLE

The 2017 SAMLA conference theme is “High Art/Low Art: Borders and Boundaries in Popular Culture.” In a November 1885 Notebook entry, Twain stated, “My books are water; those of the great geniuses is wine. Everybody drinks water.” As is characteristic of Twain’s comments, they are often self-deprecatory and ironic. His comment reflects his notion that his work is low art or “water,” which “everybody drinks.” By the time of that Notebook entry, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn had been on the market for almost a year and had been banned from libraries, hardly considered high art at the time. We welcome proposals using the conference theme that apply to any of Twain works or his biography/autobiography. Send electronic proposals (300-500 words) related to the conference theme by May 15, 2017, to session chair, Joe Alvarez (jalvarez@carolina.rr.com). SAMLA 89 will be held November 3-5, 2017 at the Westin Peachtree Plaza.

 

HIGH ART/LOW ART: BORDERS AND BOUNDARIES IN CONRAD'S FICTION

THE JOSEPH CONRAD SOCIETY OF AMERICA

In keeping with the conference theme of “High Art/Low Art: Borders and Boundaries in Popular Culture,” we are calling for papers on any aspect of Conrad Studies, but especially on aspects of Conrad that suggest “borders” or “boundaries.”  This could be a consideration of his “greatest achievements” in literature considered against his “popular successes,” or it might involve crossing borders in the sense of the various settings of his fiction (the East, the Congo, South America, etc.).  It could also involve focusing on one of the major national perspectives from which we can view Conrad or where we can consider reception on a national level (Polish Conrad, French Conrad, African Conrad, Japanese Conrad, etc.).  Please send proposals of about 150 words by June 15, 2017 to Chris Cairney at christopher.cairney@mga.edu, along with presenter’s academic affiliation, contact information, and A/V requirements. 

 

HIGH  ART / LOW ART IN PULITZER-WINNING AMERICAN DRAMA

GEORGIA AND CAROLINAS CEA

The annual Georgia and Carolinas CEA (GCCEA) SAMLA panel invites abstracts considering the ideas of High Art and/or Low Art in any and all Pulitzer-winning American dramas. By June 2, please submit a 250-word abstract, brief bio, and AV requirements to Lee Jones, Georgia State University, at ljones109@gsu.edu).

 

HIGH ART/LOW ART IN THE WORK OF EUDORA WELTY

THE EUDORA WELTY SOCIETY

The Eudora Welty Society welcomes a range of papers, but proposals addressing Welty and the SAMLA 89 theme of “High Art/Low Art: Borders and Boundaries in Popular Culture” are especially welcome. We are interested in work that investigates how Welty’s fiction, essays, or photography interact with both the high and low cultural productions of her time. How was her work in dialogue with visual arts, radio, theater productions, ballet, dance, and the blues, for example? By June 2, please submit a 250-500 word abstract, a brief bio, and A/V requirements to Ginny McCarley, University of Mississippi, at vcmccarl@olemiss.edu.

 

HIGH ART/LOW ART: MOVIE, MUSIC, AND LITERATURE IN THE GERMAN-LANGUAGE CLASSROOM

AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF TEACHERS OF GERMAN (AATG)

The AATG hosts a panel for the SAMLA 89 conference on the incorporation of German High Art and German Low Art into the foreign language classroom. The panel is interested in exploring pedagogical strategies for teaching the beauty, appeal, culture and much more through movies, music and literature and in doing so to foster critical thinking skills in today's learners. By June 2, 2017, please submit a 200-word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Angela Jakeway, ajakeway@uncc.edu with “SAMLA 89: High Art/Low Art: Movie, Music and Literature in the German-Language Classroom “in the subject line.

 

HIGH MODERNS: LOW ART

ENGLISH V (MODERN BRITISH)

This panel welcomes papers about any modernist author(s) and how art is depicted/utilized in their work. The goal is to examine from diverse perspectives how the “high art” of the modernists utilizes art, low or otherwise, textually. Paper proposals addressing the SAMLA 89 theme are especially welcome, and should be a good fit for the session. By May 31, please submit a 250-word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Joanna Pierce, Mars Hill University, at jtpierce@mhu.edu.

 

HUMOR IN AMERICA: HIGH ART/LOW ART

AMERICAN HUMOR STUDIES ASSOCIATION

This panel welcomes papers about either high art or low art, or a combination of the two, in American humor. By May 15, please submit a 250-word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to John Bird, Winthrop University, at birdj@winthrop.edu.

 

INNOVATIONS AND TECHNOLOGY IN THE CLASSROOM

AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF ITALIAN STUDIES

This panel welcomes papers about any innovative approach to teaching Italian, including but not limited to the use of technology. Paper proposals addressing the SAMLA 89 theme are especially welcome. By June 2, 2017, please submit a 250-word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Ioana Larco, University of Kentucky, at ioana.larco@uky.edu and Silvia G. Byer, Park University, at silvia.byer@park.edu.

 

INTERDISCIPLINARY APPROACHES TO TEACHING CONTEMPORARY ITALIAN CULTURE

AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF TEACHERS OF ITALIAN (AATI)

This panel welcomes any abstracts addressing interdisciplinary approaches to teaching contemporary Italian culture. Abstracts that focus on such approaches while also considering this year’s conference theme are especially welcome. By June 2, please submit a 300-word abstract, brief bio, and AV requirements to Federica Santini, Kennesaw State University, at fsantini@kennesaw.edu.

 

IT WAS FIFTY YEARS AGO TODAY: RECONSIDERING SGT. PEPPER

SOCIETY FOR CRITICAL EXCHANGE

The Beatles’ Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, released in June, 1967, was the soundtrack of the Summer of Love, and thus a pop cultural force matched by few. The album is also recognized as an enduring artistic achievement; as such, it abolished boundaries between high and low art, melding pop clout with artistic ambition. The record redefined the idea of the longplaying album, not only with its music and conceptual modernism, but with its packaging and, for the first time, its printed lyrics. I seek proposals that reconsider Sgt. Pepper, particularly in regard to its dialectical engagements and conflicts between pop and rock, postmodernism and modernism, between the Beatles and their new incarnation(s), between Western and Eastern musics, between pastiche and sincerity, and the like. The aim is to imagine a new identity for Sgt. Pepper fifty years on. By June 1, send 250-word proposals, one-page CV, and A/V requirements to Mark Osteen, Loyola University Maryland, at mosteen@loyola.edu.

 

JAMES JOYCE AND THE BOUNDARY BETWEEN HIGH AND LOW ART

INTERNATIONAL JAMES JOYCE SOCIETY

James Joyce’s career spanned the Modernist period in which the difference between High and Low Art became so blurred as to disappear. Certainly Ulysses demonstrates Joyce’s concentrated effort to merge the two to create something new in fiction – a project he would carry even further in Finnegans Wake. This panel is open, of course, to any examination of Joyce’s work, and would welcome papers that explore Joyce’s mingling of High and Low Art, and the reception of his work by the reading public and his Modernist contemporaries. Please submit a 250-word abstract of your paper, your A/V requirements if any, and a brief biography and contact information, to Dan Marshall, Session Chair, at dmarshall7@gsu.edu. Abstracts should be submitted prior to June 2, 2017.

 

LAUGHTER IN HIGH ART/LOW ART: PLAYING WITH BOUNDARIES IN FRENCH AND FRANCOPHONE LITERATURES

WOMEN IN FRENCH

Throughout history, women writers and artists have had to navigate boundaries, whether they be boundaries imposed by society or expectations regarding their art. This panel will explore the different ways in which women use laughter as a means to break down, question, and subvert boundaries in both “high art” and “low art.” Among questions one may ask: How do women use satire, irony, clichés, pastiche, etc.? and for what goal? What stances do women writers and artists take in their use of humor? How do women use humor to address women’s experiences and concerns? The panel is also interested in exploring how women, through their use of laughter, rethink different genres within “high art” and “low art” in addition to rethinking the boundaries between “high art” and “low art.” Proposals on French and francophone literatures, films, and other art forms are welcome. Papers may be in English or French.  Please send 250-word proposals in English or French to Cathy Leung (CLEUNG34@GMAIL.COM) by May 15, 2017 along with presenter’s academic affiliation, contact information, and A/V requirements.

 

MARXIST LITERARY GROUP

This session welcomes papers about any aspects of Marxism. Paper proposals addressing the SAMLA 89 theme are especially welcome. By May 31, please submit an abstract of no more than 300 words, a brief bio, and A/V requirements to Pinki Arora at pinkiarora21@yahoo.com.

 

MYSTERY, MAYHEM, SUBVERSION, AND CRIMINALITY IN FAULKNER

THE WILLIAM FAULKNER SOCIETY

The William Faulkner Society welcomes papers that explore Faulkner's use of mystery, mayhem, subversion, and criminal elements in his works. By June 2, 2017, please submit an abstract of 250-350 words, A/V requirements, and a brief bio, to Harper Strom, Georgia State University, at hstrom@gsu.edu, and Ulf Kirchdorfer, Albany State University, at Ulf.Kirchdorfer@asurams.edu.

NABOKOV'S SHORT STORIES

INTERNATIONAL VLADIMIR NABOKOV SOCIETY

This panel welcomes papers about any aspect of Nabokov’s Short Stories. Paper proposals addressing the SAMLA 89 theme are especially welcome. By May 15, 2017, please submit a 300-word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Eric Hyman, Fayetteville State University, at ehyman@UNCFSU.edu.

 

PARADOX AND FORM: HIGH AND LOW ART IN EARLY MODERN LITERATURE

SOUTHEAST RENAISSANCE CONFERENCE

According to Kant, the sublime simultaneously induces pain and pleasure, and in his sociological reading of Kant, Pierre Bourdieu argues that taste classifies the taster, that individual, subjective appreciation of art is predicated upon a priori sociocultural privilege.  The early modern period was the site for clashes of many intellectual threads: medieval to modern, Catholic to Reformation, manuscript to print.  In addition to his voluminous theological writings, Martin Luther wrote countless polemical texts riddled with scatological invective.  From Cervantes’s parody of chivalric romance to Star Wars screenplays rewritten in early modern English, the boundary between high and low culture has provided a paradoxical space to interrogate both the sublime and the mundane, the pleasurable and the painful.

This panel seeks to address the aesthetics of high and low in the paradoxical space between them in the context of early modern English literature.  Possible topics might include:

Paradox and form in Early Modern Literature
Early modern satire
Modern and post-modern appropriations and re-workings of early modern texts
Early modern aesthetic theory
Highbrow and lowbrow in Shakespeare

Please submit 250-word abstracts to Dr. Ruth McIntyre at rmcinty1@kennesaw.edu by June 1, 2017.

 

POP SOUTH: CONSUMING THE REGION

EMERGING SCHOLARS ORGANIZATION (SOCIETY FOR THE STUDY OF SOUTHERN LITERATURE)

The U.S. South is persistently served up for aesthetic consumption: from nineteenth century southwestern humor sketches to the televisual spectacles of Buckwild and Honey Boo-Boo, or in contemporary media from the S-Town podcast to Atlanta’s trap music scene. While the modernisms of Faulkner, Toomer, and O’Connor produced iconic conceptualizations of the South, the Pop South has emerged to complicate those conventions. The Emerging Scholars Organization of the Society for the Study of Southern Literature invites paper proposals that meditate on southern representation, popular culture, and media forms designed for mass consumption. We seek abstracts about southern popular culture and/or southern representations in U.S. or global medias. For this panel, the “Pop” of Pop South can refer to style and tone of multiple media, such as music, television, film, magazine, sketch culture, and popular literature. While all papers should consider the topic of the South and popular media, other intersections might include: ·

Aesthetics of southern Pop-iness ·
Commodification of the South via popular media ·
Representations of the South/southerness in national or global contexts ·
Stereotypes of the South, and or southern-made stereotypes ·
Brandings of the South · Accessibility of southern representations ·
Popular representations of/in the Global South, Appalachian South, or Circum-Caribbean South

We welcome participants inside and outside of southern studies, as well as those who have wideranging conceptions of both “Pop” and “South. Please send 300-word proposals and A/V requirements to emergingscholarsorg@gmail.com by June 16, 2017.

 

POPULAR CULTURE

COLLEGE ENGLISH ASSOCIATION 

This year the College English Association solicits abstracts from its members on the special focus of the 89th SAMLA conference: “High Art/Low Art: Borders and Boundaries in Popular Culture.” From the selection of singer and songwriter Bob Dylan as the winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature last year to the election as President of a former reality-television star, the topic could not be more timely nor seminal. Please send abstracts and any A/V requirements to Prof. Lynne M. Simpson at lsimpson@presby.edu by May 22, 2017.

 

POPULAR CULTURE AND THE ENVIRONMENT

ASSOCIATION FOR THE STUDY OF LITERATURE AND THE ENVIRONMENT (ASLE)

The Association for the Study of Literature and the Environment (ASLE) invites papers on the portrayal of the environment and environmental issues in popular culture, including literature, film, television, and other media. Please send a 250-word abstract and a description of your A/V needs to: Kelly C. Walter Carney at kwaltercarney@methodist.edu by 1 June 2017.

 

POPULAR HISPANIC CULTURE BEYOND BORDERS AND BOUNDARIES

FEMINISTAS UNIDAS

The panel invites papers that examine the borders and boundaries in popular Hispanic culture as these are defined by race, gender, ethnicity, religious and/or political views. We are interested in discussing the influence, consequences and overall impact of these components on the society and individual. By May 5th, 2017 please submit a 250-word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Eugenia Charoni, Flagler College, at echaroni@flagler.edu. Panelists must be members of BOTH Feministas Unidas and SAMLA to participate in the panel.

 

POPULAR PRINT CULTURE

SOCIETY FOR THE HISTORY OF AUTHORSHIP, READING, AND PUBLISHING (SHARP)

Papers are invited for the Society for the History of Authorship, Reading, and Publishing (SHARP) affiliate session at the 2017 SAMLA Convention. Potential topics include print culture, history of the book, authorship, publishing history, ephemera, illustration, publishers’ archives, production, circulation, and reception. Papers addressing this year’s convention theme, “High Art/Low Art Borders and Boundaries in Popular Culture,” are especially welcome. What connections can be made between print culture/book history and the diverse world of popular culture? How has print culture reflected popular taste from the early modern world to the present? 
Possible topics include:
Genre fiction
Sensation fiction
Science fiction
Gothic
Ghost stories
Historical fiction/fantasy
Pulp fiction
Detective fiction/thrillers
Adventure fiction
Westerns
Popular magazines
Newspapers
Romance novels (Mills & Boon, etc.)
Reprint libraries
Dime novels
Penny dreadfuls
Ephemera (postcards, pamphlets, broadsides, advertising, etc.)
The evolving study of middlebrow writing
The borderlands of popular print culture (historical, geographical, etc.)
Proposers need not be members of SHARP to submit, but panelists must be members of both SAMLA and SHARP in order to present. By June 1, 2017, please send a 350-word abstract and short biography (together in one document) to SHARP liaison Dr. Melissa Makala, Spartanburg Methodist College, at me.makala@gmail.com.

 

PRUFROCK AND OTHER OBSERVATIONS: A CENTENARY

T.S. ELIOT SOCIETY

This special panel sponsored by the T. S. Eliot Society invites papers on Eliot’s life and work.  In particular, papers on the 1917 volume Prufrock and Other Observations are especially welcomed.  This year’s conference them is High Art/Low Art: Borders and Boundaries in Popular Culture.

Note: All submissions will be considered for a special cluster marking the centenary of Eliot's first poetry collection in volume 2 of The T. S. Eliot Studies Annual.

By June 1, 2017, please submit, please submit a 250-word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Craig Woelfel, at Flagler College (cwoelfel@flagler.edu).

This year's South Atlantic Modern Languages Association (SAMLA) conference will be held in Atlanta, GA, November 3-5, at the Westin Peachtree Plaza.  For further information, please see the SAMLA website, https://samla.memberclicks.net

 

ROBERT PENN WARREN AND TIME

ROBERT PENN WARREN CIRCLE

The name of the story will be Time,
But you must not pronounce its name.

 

Most of Warren’s oeuvre concerns itself with Time in one way or another, whether through personal memory, metaphysical speculation, “official” history, cultural traditions, or prognostication.  While the historical and socio-historical elements of Warren’s work remain of permanent interest, we particularly encourage studies that explore Time in its relation to Warren’s metaphysical quest, or “yearning,” and/or in its relation to his aesthetics. Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Classicism & Idealism
  • The Western Tradition & Warren’s Forms
  • Warren’s “vital image,” Memory, & Epistemology
  • Warren & St. Augustine
  • Personal & Collective Histories in Warren
  • Narrative & Culture
  • Warren as an Historical Personage
  • Writers Who Influenced Warren, or Were Influenced by Warren 

By June 2, 2017, please submit a 300-600 word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Kyle Taylor, RPW Circle Secretary, at rpwcircle@gmail.com.

 

ROMANTICISM AND POPULAR CULTURE

KEATS-SHELLEY ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA

Romanticism and Popular Culture, an affiliated session of the Keats-Shelley Association of America at the South Atlantic Modern Language Association 89th Annual Conference in Atlanta, Georgia, USA (3-5 Nov. 2017)

In keeping with this year’s conference theme (“High Art/Low Art: Borders and Boundaries in Popular Culture”), this panel seeks papers that address topics related to popular culture and British Romantic-era literature, although other Romanticism-related topics certainly will be considered.  Sponsored by the Keats-Shelley Association of America, this affiliated session especially welcomes papers related to second-generation Romantic-era British writers and/or their literary circles, namely those addressing the lives and/or works of John Keats, Percy and Mary Shelley, Lord Byron, Leigh Hunt, and William Hazlitt.

See <http://k-saa.org> for more information about the Keats-Shelley Association of America.

Please send a 250-word abstract, bio or CV (no more than ONE page), and any audio-visual requests to Ben P. Robertson, Troy University (bprobertson@troy.edu), by 15 May 2017.

 

SPACE AND PLACE IN FRENCH AND FRANCOPHONE WOMEN'S WRITING

WOMEN IN FRENCH

Recent political events abroad and local are frequently framed around issues of place and, arguably, space. This session proposes to investigate space and place, and how these concepts play out in women’s narrative (texts or films). In what ways do women’s narratives create new understandings of space and place? In what ways might these spaces and places be gendered? And, in what way are they an experience of othering? Does women’s experience create a new space and place, and if so, in what ways? Please send a 250 word abstract in English or French to E. Nicole Meyer, nimeyer@augusta.edu by 15 May 2017 along with presenter’s academic affiliation, contact information, and A/V requirements. 

 

SPECTACLES AND PERFORMANCES: VOODOO AESTHETICS WITHIN LOW AND HIGH ART FORMS

MELUS

The pairing of voodoo and literature causes one to immediately think of writers like Charles Chesnutt, Zora Neale Hurston, Ishmael Reed, Toni Cade Bambara, and Jewell Parker Rhodes, as these authors use conjure unequivocally within their literary works. However, voodoo flows more freely in the veins of popular culture than one may realize. Though Christian cultures have largely shunned voodoo as a practice, Western literature has used voodoo as sites of spectacles, moments of revenge, and performances of Africanness. In fact, western literature has a nuanced relationship with voodoo or voodoo aesthetics. Voodoo Aesthetics refers to the use of Vodun’s religious principles and iconography that adhere to a text’s purpose and develop the thematic effect. Undeniably, voodoo captures the imagination of black and white writers, which reveals both the obsession and reverence of it within American culture. For example, from Maurice Thompson’s poem “Voodoo Prophecy” to Zombie movies drawing on the horrors of conjure and rootwork, the use of voodoo reveals a white fear of blackness, even a repercussion for slavery while works like Bambara’s or Rhodes’ evoke a sense of empowerment, much like the way voodoo is credited for starting the Haitian Revolution. Moreover, voodoo or voodoo aesthetics also take on different roles when used in high and low art forms. Lower art forms may use voodoo aesthetics to create spectacles out of blackness or black suffering while higher art forms use voodoo aesthetics as an agent to evoke power and connect to an African past. The lower art forms perpetuate, exploit, or turn on racial stereotypes while the higher art forms dignify and legitimize African spiritual traditions that Western culture devalues and ridicules. The MELUS panel Spectacles and Performances: Voodoo Aesthetics within Low and High Art Forms seeks papers that explore the differing functions of voodoo or voodoo aesthetics in low and high art forms. We seek papers that examine a broad range of genres: movies, including the Blaxploitation films of the 1970s, comics/graphic novels, poetry, novels, short stories, and plays. How does voodoo or voodoo aesthetics interact with the text’s intended audience? What aspects of Africana culture are being exploited or exposed? What appropriations are made to create regional or racial identities? What are the differences between the spectacles drawing the audience’s gaze to blackness and the performances of African spirituality informing healthy black identities?

 

Please send 300-word abstract to Ren Denton at gdenton@ega.edu and Kameelah Martin at martink@savannahstate.edu by June 2, 2017.

 

SPECULATIVE SOUTHS

SOCIETY FOR THE STUDY OF SOUTHERN LITERATURE (SSSL)

This panel seeks work that engages with the U.S. South in science fiction, fantasy, and other forms of speculative fiction. Papers may consider speculative fiction by southern authors, texts that represent the South and conceptions of southern identity, or explore how such works redefine regional, national, or interplanetary boundaries. Examples may include papers on texts and other media that imagine alternate histories of slavery, the Civil War, and Reconstruction, as well as those that map imaginary Souths onto fictional worlds. Topics may include Afrofuturism, science fictions of the global South, utopias, and dystopias. To include a broad range of perspectives, we plan a roundtable with 6 -8 scholars offering 5-7 minute presentations. By May 31, please send a 250-word abstract, brief bio, and AV requirements to Erich Nunn, Auburn University, at etn0002@auburn.edu.

 

STEALING PAST THE WATCHFUL DRAGONS: YOUNG ADULT LITERATURE AND ALLEGORY

SOUTHEAST CONFERENCE ON CHRISTIANITY AND LITERATURE

In deliberating on how fairy stories inoculate us against our religious allergies, CS Lewis writes, “[S]upposing that by casting” truths about God and Christ “into an imaginary world, stripping them of their stained-glass and Sunday School associations, one could make” those profound religious truths “for the first time appear in their real potency. Could one not thus steal past those watchful dragons?” As a continuation of Lewis’s question, this panel welcomes papers that address the connection between Young Adult literature and the literary mode of allegory, specifically how YA literature can use allegory to reveal potent spiritual truths. Papers may address allegory as a method of writing or interpreting YA literature, the way in which Christianity informs allegorical methods of writing and reading YA literature, or the intertextual relationship between more traditional allegorical literature and YA literary adaptations. Proposals addressing the SAMLA 89 theme are especially welcome. This panel is sponsored by the Southeast Conference on Christianity and Literature. By June 1, please email a 250-word abstract along with a current CV, and audio/visual requirements, to Jonathan Sircy at jsircy@csuniv.edu.

 

STORYTELLING IN THE LITERATURE OF EDWIDGE DANTICANT

EDWIDGE DANTICAT SOCIETY

The Edwidge Danticat Society invites papers for our affiliate panel at the 89th Annual South Atlantic Modern Language Association conference in Atlanta, Georgia. The theme of this year’s conference is High Art/Low Art: Borders and Boundaries in Popular Culture. We welcome papers that examine stories and storytelling in the literature of Edwidge Danticat, who has been referred to as “Haiti’s Storyteller.” Storytelling as an art, a family pastime, and a communal undertaking is ubiquitous in Danticat’s oeuvre, whether invoked in the artifice of her literature, represented through her characters, or discussed in her cultural commentary. The Edwidge Danticat Society invites proposals for 15-minute presentations, and possible topics addressing storytelling include, but are not limited to:

● Survival and/or resistance during precarious times
● Testimonio, dangerous creation
● Narrativity and form
● Tradition and/or collective memory
● Literary influence
● Audience and literary reception
● Identity and performativity

By May 20, 2017, please submit a 150 word biography, 300 word abstract (including working title) and any a/v needs to Megan Feifer, megan.feifer@edwidgedanticatsociety.org or Maia Butler, maia.butler@edwidgedanticatsociety.org. Membership with the Edwidge Danticat Society (www.edwidgedanticatsociety.org) is required for panelists, but it is not required to submit proposals for consideration. South Atlantic MLA membership and conference registration (samla.memberclicks.net/conference) must be paid by August 31st, 2017, or papers/panels will not appear in the conference program.

 

STUDIES IN THE WORKS AND LIFE OF TRUMAN CAPOTE

TRUMAN CAPOTE LITERARY SOCIETY

This panel welcomes abstracts focusing on any aspect of the works and life of Truman Capote. Proposals addressing the SAMLA 89 theme are especially welcome. By June 2, please submit a 300-word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Stuart Noel, Georgia State University, at snoel1@gsu.edu

 

TRANSCENDING BORDERS AND BOUNDARIES THROUGH THE ACT OF WRITING

WOMEN IN FRENCH

Chères collègues, chers collègues,

Pour celles et ceux qui travaillent sur les écrivaines françaises et francophones et qui pensent participer au congrès annuel de SAMLA qui aura lieu à  Atlanta, GA du 3-5 novembre 2017, je voudrais proposer une session WIF dont le thème général du congrès, “L’art noble et l’art populaire:  Les frontières et les limites dans la culture populaire” fournira une occasion unique d’explorer ces pôles à travers des textes écrits par des femmes de lettres francophones.  Je vous prie d’examiner ces délimitations, les zones tranfrontalières, les zones subtiles aussi bien que la possibilité de dépasser les frontières de nationalité, de classe, de race, de sexe et de langage grâce à l’acte d’écrire.  Veuillez m’envoyer une proposition de 250 mots en français et anglais accompagnée d’une brève notice bio-biographique avant le 15 mai 2017 à Susan Crampton-Frenchik, scramptonfrenchik@washjeff.edu

Visitez https://samla.memberclicks.net/ pour des renseignements supplémentaires sur SAMLA et le congrès annuel.

Je vous remercie d’avance de votre considération.  Bonne continuation et meilleurs vœux pour l’année 2017.

Bien cordialement, Susan

For those who specialize in French and francophone female writers who are considering participating in the 2017 SAMLA (South Atlantic Modern Language Association) Conference to be held in Atlanta, GA, 3-5 November 2017, I am proposing a WIF session based on the general conference theme “High and Low Art:  Borders and Boundaries in Popular Culture.”  Examinations of borders and boundaries, border areas, liminal spaces and the ways in which these texts transcend limitations of nationality, class, race, sex, and language are welcome. Please send a 250 word abstract in French or English to Susan Crampton-Frenchik, scramptonfrenchik@washjeff.edu by 15 May 2017. For more information about SAMLA and the annual conference, please visit https://samla.memberclicks.net/

Thank you in advance for your consideration.  Best wishes for 2017.

Susan

 

TRANSGRESSING ARTISTIC BORDERS: THE HIGH/LOW PORTRAYAL OF THE AFRICAN-AMERICAN EXPERIENCE IN THE WORK OF LANGSTON HUGHES AND HIS CONTEMPORARIES

 

THE LANGSTON HUGHES SOCIETY

 

In his 1999 text Authentic Blackness: The Folk in the New Negro Renaissance, J. Martin Favor asserts that “[b]y privileging certain African American identities and voices over others, the critic of African American literature often restricts too severely his or her scope of intellectual inquiry into the construction of racial identity” (3). To some extent, this very notion proves the central debate of the Harlem Renaissance era, as the 1920s saw an influx in publications tracing the black aesthetic and probing the question of how the African-American community should be best depicted in black art. From the infamous questionnaire published by W.E.B. Du Bois in the Crisis to Langston Hughes’ “The Negro Artist and the Racial Mountain” of the same year, these authors were engaged in critical conversations about the new direction of the African-American literary tradition at a time when the Negro was most in vogue.

 

In responding to the SAMLA 89 conference theme of “High/Low Art: Borders and Boundaries in Popular Culture,” the Langston Hughes Society asks for potential participants to consider how Langston Hughes as well as his contemporaries defined and transgressed the borders between high and low art in their literary texts. For instance, how might Hughes’ “Your Simple Minded Friend,” as Arna Bontemps notes in a 1919 letter, serve “as a device for treating topics which would otherwise seem high-flown or academic”—“a way of commenting on current events and pronouncements”? How might the portrait of black middle class life in Fauset’s novel There is Confusion offer a very different image than the lives of the common folk depicted in McKay’s Home to Harlem and Hughes’ Not Without Laughter? Consider texts such as Hughes’ Montage of a Dream Deferred and its representations of class and the African-American racial consciousness in the post-World War II era where art and social action would often converge. Consider also the blues poems that embodied the emotional tenor of black life in the twentieth century but for which Hughes was once condemned when reading at a colored church in Atlantic City shortly after the publication of The Weary Blues. Proposals examining the work of Langston Hughes specifically (or intersections with Hughes) are especially welcome.

 

For consideration, please submit abstracts of approximately 250 to 300 words to Dr. Wallis Baxter III as an E-mail attachment at lhsociety.president@gmail.com. The deadline for submissions is June 2, 2017. Note that accepted presenters must be members of SAMLA and the LHS by June 30, 2017 in order to participate. SAMLA 89 will be held at the Westin Peachtree Plaza in Atlanta, GA, from November 3-5, 2017.

 

THE UNCERTAINTY SOCIETY

New this year to SAMLA is The Uncertainty Society.  A reflection of our times, the poets involved in the uncertainty movement first made themselves know in the USA in the anthology Poetry Facing Uncertainty, published in 2012.  This year, we anticipate having guest poets from Spain, Mexico, Colombia and Central America.  Presentations that deal with the poetry of uncertainty as it relates to societal issues, social media, electronic publishing, the visual arts and music will receive special consideration.

The special focus for SAMLA 89 is High Art/Low Art: Borders and Boundaries in Popular Culture. Please send presentations that will fit within the framework of this theme.  The program will be crafted from the submissions received.  The number of presenters will determine the length of the presentations; they are usually 15-20 minutes. 

Please send proposals, representative selections, and AV requirements to:  Dr. Gordon E. McNeer at gordon.mcneer@ung.edu

Deadline for submissions is 2 June.

 

URBAN SOUTHS

EMERGING SCHOLARS ORGANIZATION (SOCIETY FOR THE STUDY OF SOUTHERN LITERATURE)

Interstate 95, the hinge around which eastern U.S. megalopolises move, stretches from Rhode Island to Florida, with its halfway point somewhere in the Carolinas. The cities it was designed to serve, and the cities that grew up around it, are central texts of Urban Studies: New York City is, of course, a core of American urbanism, and Baltimore – where, as filmmaker John Waters has joked, southern eccentrics landed when they ran out of gas on fugitive flights toward NYC – provides the setting for The Wire as the reliable televisual shorthand for so much public scholarship on the power and possibility of cities. The southern cities that appear along I-95’s winding path –Richmond, Savannah, Charleston, Jacksonville – are a mixture of ports of the Old South and the new ‘knowledge economy’ centers of the Sun Belt. Through a series of paved rings and loops, one might eventually find their way from this path to I-20, I-40, and I-10, hitting Nashville, Knoxville, Birmingham, Mobile, New Orleans, Austin, and Atlanta. The latter city is, of course, the capital of New South popular culture and, indeed, much of New Southern Studies. These are decidedly urban and distinctly southern sites, but ones that are seldom placed in conversation with thinkers from urban studies (whether Jane Jacobs, Richard Florida, or others). Our panel invites abstracts of 300 words for presentations that consider the urbanity of the South and the southernness of urbanity in literature and popular culture. Potential topics could be as far-ranging as critical readings of maps or reality television, considerations of urban slavery, and contemporary gentrification. Abstracts and A/V requirements should be sent to Jennie Lightweis-Goff (jlg@olemiss.edu) by June 15, 2017.

 

THE WORKS OF MIGUEL DE CERVANTES

CERVANTES SOCIETY OF AMERICA

This roundtable seeks presenters that engage with the theme of this year's convention, High Art / Low Art: Borders and Boundaries in Popular Culture, as it relates to the works of Miguel de Cervantes. Presentations may focus on one or several works. Please submit a 250-word abstract to Brian Phillips, Jackson State University (brian.m.phillips@jsums.edu), by May 30, 2017.