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AFFILIATED GROUP SESSIONS

 

ABOUT WOMEN AND THE WORKPLACE, FROM ANNIE EMAUX TO ALICE ZENITER

WOMEN IN FRENCH 

In the last 25 years, the workplace has become increasingly important in literary narratives. The role of women in the professional world is well represented in works of fiction by Annie Ernaux, Marie Ndiaye, and Maylis de Kerangal. Women workers also appear prominently in novels authored by Lydie Salvayre (1993, 2010), Marie Darrieussecq (1996, 2016), Amélie Nothomb (1999), Delphine de Vigan (2009, 2018), Nathalie Kuperman (2010), Florence Aubenas (2010), Véronique Ovaldé (2013), Alice Zeniter (2015, 2017) Leila Slimani (2016), Emilie Guillaumin (2016), Catherine Poulain (2016, 2018), and Camille Laurens (2017), to name but a few.

 

These novels and narratives address various topics including poverty, gender inequalities as well as psychological and sexual violence. Contemporary works of fiction by women often attempt to reclaim the workplace as one belonging equally to all, regardless of assumptions about gender. Narratives describe the work place as a disputed site replete with various forms of political engagement. The struggle for better wages and work conditions as well as the acquisition of new work skills can herald new forms of heroism. Here we will seek to understand what is at stake in literary representations of women in the world of business.
 
Please send a 200-word abstract in English or French to Nora Cottille-Foley, Georgia Institute of Technology, [email protected] by May 15, 2019 along with presenter’s academic affiliation, contact information, as well as a short biography and A/V requirements. 

ADAPTATION STUDIES

ASSOCIATION OF ADAPTATION STUDIES

This session welcomes submissions on any aspect of adaptation studies. This year's SAMLA theme is Languages: Power, Identity, Relationships, which seems wonderfully in harmony with adaptation studies. Certainly, a text and another text that adapts it are part of a linguistic relationship of power and identity, reveals new dimensions, meanings, nuances, and revelations among texts. Proposals addressing the conference theme are especially welcome, but by no means required. By May 25, 2019, please submit an abstract of 75 words, a brief bio, and any A/V requests to Dennis R. Perry, Adaptation Studies, at [email protected].

 

ALONE! MARGINALITY OF WOMEN'S VOICES TODAY

WOMEN IN FRENCH

Since the emergence of Femen or the #Me Too campaign, the collective feminist movements have taken over new ways and forms of expression. While these discussions are now even more accessible to people and often appear universal, this panel will investigate the special case of intentionally marginalized feminine speaking, in its form and content, in the contemporary French and francophone literature. Examining singular identities revealed by such writings, the papers will consider the strength of the words, expressed not in the interest of a group but for the sake of an individual. What is characteristic of the language of these women, authors and characters, when they state isolated claims? What is the nature of their complaints and accusations? How do the deeds become words and what are their consequences? Do these women’s voices find in their marginality, assumed or endured, a positive source of power or, on the contrary, does this power play out in a negative way? Finally, do these writings echo (maybe despite themselves) the collective feminist movements or, on the contrary, do they find a legitimacy asserting their unique story? These are some questions this panel proposes to consider. Please send a 250-word abstract in English or French to Julie Crohas Commans, Auburn University, [email protected] by May 15, 2019 along with presenter's academic affiliation, contact information, as well as a short biography and A/V requirements.

 

BITING BACK: EMPOWERMENT IN THE WORKS OF FRANCOPHONE WOMEN WRITERS

WOMEN IN FRENCH

In keeping with the purpose of SAMLA 91 to “celebrate languages, the ways we use them, the ways they use us, the ways they shape our realities,” this Women in French panel welcomes papers that investigate how Francophone writers employ French—the language of the oppressor but also a language of liberation—in order to reclaim their own cannibal(ized) language, identity, and power. As Valérie Loichot contends in The Tropics Bite Back, “While cannibalism is one of the main controlling images forced onto the Caribbean and its inhabitants, Caribbean writers have also reclaimed it as a privileged mode of cultural resistance, or eating back” (xxvi). Of particular interest in this panel are papers that examine how Francophone women writers have cannibalized French language, history, and literature to rewrite and reimagine the lives of their predecessors and give them the personal voices and subjectivities History denies them. How have they used the power of language to rewrite history and re`affirm a tradition of resistance? How is writing in French, refusing to write in French, or crafting a unique language a means to chart new territories for Francophone women writers? Please send a 250-word abstract in French or English to Delphine Gras ([email protected]) by May 15, 2019.

 

CEA AT SAMLA

COLLEGE ENGLISH ASSOCIATION (CEA)

The College English Association solicits abstracts from its members on the special focus of the 91st SAMLA conference from November 15-17 in Atlanta: Languages: Power, Identity and Relationships. Presentations that celebrate “the power of language to change lives and make our world a better place for all” are particularly welcome.

Proposals can be pedagogical in nature or relate to any aspect of English studies. Scholars may also submit papers that are beyond this scope and/or unrelated to the SAMLA theme. 

Please send abstracts and any A/V requirements to Marissa Glover McLargin, Secretary, Florida CEA, at [email protected] by May 17, 2019. More information on the SAMLA conference may be found at https://samla.memberclicks.net/.

Steve Brahlek, CEA Director of Technology, is also soliciting original works of fiction, poetry, or non-fiction for a second panel. Kindly send proposals directly to him at [email protected] by May 17.

 

CONFRONTING LANGUAGE FACE-TO-FACE: PEDAGOGICAL ROUNDTABLE ON CRITICAL REFLECTION

WOMEN IN FRENCH

“Reflection makes all of us self-aware. It challenges us to think deeply about how we learn and why and why not. [It] deepens ownership [and] helps us get comfortable with uncomfortable. Perhaps most importantly, reflection helps us advocate for ourselves and support others.” –Angela Stockman

The language classroom is a site of multiple encounters where successes and failures emerge when instructor, student, and language come face-to-face with each other. At their best, the outcomes can be sweet and inspirational, but at their worst, they can be discouraging and even disheartening. Critical reflection can be an effective tool to help both instructor and student navigate the waters of language learning and process their encounters. It can guide students to better understand the transformations within themselves, as well as others, so that they become more responsible, more open-minded, and more compassionate citizens of the world.

In this session, participants will present the ways that they implement critical reflection in French language classes, as well as the results that ensue. Questions to be considered can include, but are not limited to, the following: How is critical reflection implemented in language courses? What methods are used, and why? What challenges arise when students confront their experience with language face-to-face? What constitutes a successful confrontation? When is this practice unsuccessful?

Please send a 250-word abstract in English or French by 15 May 2019 along with the presenter’s academic affiliation and contact information to Jodie Barker: [email protected].

 

CONRAD AND POWER

THE JOSEPH CONRAD SOCIETY

The panel organizers are especially interested in 15-20 minute papers on power in any aspect of Joseph Conrad’s life and works. Proposals addressing the broader elements of the conference theme or on any Conradian theme in multimedia contexts are also welcome. By May 25, please submit an abstract of 350 words, a brief bio, and any A/V requests to Professor Lissa Schneider-Rebozo, University of Wisconsin-River Falls, at [email protected].

 

ELEPHANTS IN THE ROOM: ADDRESSING RACE AND RACISM IN MEDIEVAL STUDIES AND STUDIES OF THE U.S. SOUTH

SSSL'S EMERGING SCHOLARS ORGANIZATION (ESO)

In the wake of Christchurch and Charlottesville, it has become apparent that white supremacists are using the language, power, and identity of medieval Europe and the Southern United States to justify violence. In the interest of exploring the role of teachers and researchers of spatial and chronological geographies such as Medieval and southern studies, Medieval and Renaissance Interdisciplinary Studies (MARIS) at Louisiana State University and the Emerging Scholars Organization (ESO) of the Society for the Study of Southern Literature invite proposals from scholars and teachers that answer the following questions: 

  • How do you ethically research within a field whose subjects and objects of study have been constructed to maintain discriminatory epistemologies of race, region, nationalism, and religion? 
  • How do you ethically teach the history and memory of literary periods for which many popular audiences have embraced manufactured nostalgia that so often whitewashes public histories and memories?
  • When and where should researchers and teachers of Medieval and southern studies address the institutionalization of race and racism in their disciplines? How does or doesn’t it serve the academy, and the broader public, to do so?

To include a broad range of perspectives, we plan a roundtable with 6-8 scholars offering 5-7 minute presentations. Please submit a 250-word abstract, brief bio, and AV requirements by June 1st, 2019, to Joshua Ryan Jackson ([email protected]), Gayle Fallon ([email protected]), and Kelly Vines ([email protected]).

 

ELIZABETH MADOX ROBERTS: INSIGHT AND REFLECTION

ELIZABETH MADOX ROBERTS SOCIETY

Papers for this session may deal with all aspects of Roberts’ work and life. Suggested topics include, but are not limited to, the following: Roberts and new work; Roberts and manuscripts; Roberts in the context of Southern literature; Roberts and Southern Agrarianism; Roberts’ literary and stylistic influences; Roberts and religion; Roberts and Modernism; Roberts and Regionalism; Roberts and the politics of literary reputation; Roberts and feminism; and, Roberts and Kentucky. Papers engaging directly with the conference theme are also strongly encouraged. Abstracts should be 250 words and sent, by May 27th, to Jamie Stamant, Agnes Scott College, at [email protected].

 

FOR COLORED GIRLS AND BEYOND: NEW VISIONS OF NTOZAKE SHANGE 

THE LANGSTON HUGHES SOCIETY
In honor of her life and legacy, the Langston Hughes Society, in addition to our panel, “’The Task of the Negro Writer as an Artist’: Language as Vehicle of Power and Identity Construction in the Work of Langston Hughes and His Contemporaries,” will also be sponsoring a panel on Ntozake Shange at the 2019 South Atlantic Modern Language Association Conference that we hope will elicit strong papers that participants will consider expanding for publication in a future special issue of the Langston Hughes Review. 
 
“Along with Jayne Cortez, Toni Cade Bambara, and others,” writes Farah Jasmine Griffin, “Shange introduced black women into literature who were creative, multilingual, bohemian, literate, hip to avant-garde jazz and Latin music, and political. These were women whose work emerged from the encounter of the Black Arts Movement with feminism.” As such, Shange forged a complex feminism that embraced the contradictions of black life and de/constructed trauma, while using all of this to promote activism and happiness in her stories. As a poet, playwright, novelist, actor, and dancer, she was one of the most influential black feminists of her generation. For instance, in her book When Chickenheads Come Home to Roost, the hip hop feminist Joan Morgan writes, “For my mother and black women like her, Shange’s play gave their experiences a legitimacy and a voice it would take me years to comprehend.” What is Shange’s legacy for contemporary black women artists and scholars? We seek contributions that broadly explore the following entre points of engagement of Shange’s archive and repertoire:
 
  • How does dancing express black women’s agency in Shange’s writings? What is the significance of dance in her work?
  • How have stage and/or film adaptations of Shange’s work reimagined or expanded our understanding of Shange as poet and/or playwright?
  • How do Beyonce’s dancing, visual albums, videos, and/or film Lemonade elaborate on Shange’s premise in for colored girls who have considered suicide when the rainbow is enuf?
  • How does queer theory illuminate the sexual politics in Shange’s writings and/or kinesthesia?
  • How do the works of critically acclaimed playwrights such as Suzan-Lori Parks, Lynn Nottage, and Dominique Morisseau build upon and/or contrast with the aesthetic and cultural politics of Shange?
  • How are Shange’s poetry, plays, novels and/or essays interconnected with the legacy of Langston Hughes?
  • In what ways are Shange’s writings shaped by her experiences in St. Louis during Jim Crow?
  • In her later years, Shange suffered strokes and other physical ailments that prevented her from writing for several years. How would methodologies in disabilities studies facilitate our understanding of how her mobility shifts in the twilight of her life impacted her writing and performance that reveal systemic ableism?
 
Please send proposals of no more than five hundred words (for a fifteen to twenty-minute paper) to Dr. Christopher Varlack, President ([email protected]) and Dr. Richard Hancuff, Secretary ([email protected]) no later than May 31, 2019, with a response expected no later than May 26, 2019. Note that in addition to paying the membership and registration fees for SAMLA, presenters must also be members of the Langston Hughes Society by the time of the conference in order to present. Please indicate any audio-visual needs (if essential) in your E-mail. For more information on the Langston Hughes Society and our ongoing work, please visit our website at www.LangstonHughesSociety.org.
 
Note also that expanded versions of the papers that are presented at SAMLA will be considered for publication in the special issue of the Langston Hughes Review. Articles should be between 4500 and 6000 words, excluding endnotes and references. Please address questions to the LHR Editor, Tony Bolden, at [email protected]. The deadline for submissions for this special issue is January 15, 2020.

 

FLANNERY O'CONNOR: LANGUAGES AND POWER, IDENTITY, AND RELATIONSHIPS

FLANNERY O'CONOR SOCIETY

The Flannery O’Connor Society invites papers on topics relevant to the SAMLA 91 conference theme: Languages: Power, Identity, Relationships, especially those that examine the ideas of political, religious, or spiritual power, race and/or dialect, irony and parody, the grotesque, low and high art, disability, or language and religion in the life and works of Flannery O’Connor. Please, send 300-word abstracts by May 15, 2019, to Cameron Lee Winter, University of Georgia, at [email protected]. Please also include a brief bio and any A/V requirements in your abstract.

 

FLANNERY O'CONNOR: OPEN TOPIC

FLANNERY O'CONNOR SOCIETY

The Flannery O’Connor Society invites papers on any topic in the life and works of Flannery O’Connor. Please, send 300-word abstracts by May 15, 2019, to Cameron Lee Winter, University of Georgia, at [email protected]. Please also include a brief bio and any A/V requirements in your abstract.

 

GIVING VOICE TO THE VOICELESS

WOMEN IN FRENCH

This session aims to interrogate how French and Francophone women’s narrative (texts or films) portrays the marginalized, the repressed, and/or the underrepresented. Presentations will investigate works of authors/filmmakers who made themselves a spokesperson for the voiceless, casting light on stories that otherwise would have remained unheard within their own communities as well as globally. What does it mean to be “voiceless,” and how do these authors/filmmakers give value to the experiences of these people who, for lack of authority, education, or economic means, are not able to convey them on their own? Topics may include but are not limited to life-writing, translation, postcolonial and gender studies. Please send a 250-word abstract in English or French to Viviana Pezzullo, [email protected] by May 15, 2019, along with presenter’s academic affiliation, contact information, and A/V requirements.

 

HEMINGWAY SOCIETY: HEMINGWAY, LOVE, AND MARRIAGE

THE HEMINGWAY SOCIETY

The Hemingway Society Session for the 2019 SAMLA Convention in Atlanta solicits papers on "Hemingway, Love, and Marriage." In contrast to the recent proliferation of biographical and fictional accounts of the author's love life, the panel is instead seeking papers focused on how love and marriage are presented and developed in Hemingway's various works of fiction.

Please send a 500 word abstract with a brief CV by May 25, 2019, to Scott Yarbrough, Charleston Southern University, [email protected]

 

LANGUAGE AND LIFE WRITING: WOMEN'S WORDS TO SAY IT IN CONTEMPORARY FRENCH AND FRANCOPHONE LITERATURE

WOMEN IN FRENCH

Marie Cardinal’s 1975 autobiographical novel, Les Mots pour le dire, marked a turning point in the landscape of women’s life-writing projects within French culture. By employing a first-person voice to document the narrator’s analysis while at the same time to re-create or re-imagine her memories, this narrative broke the silence, shame, and guilt of a complicated mother-daughter relationship and, in so doing, allowed the author/narrator insight into her corporeal and subjective truths. Les Mots pour le dire also tied the personal to the political. All of these narrative pathways have since been explored to different ends by contemporary women writers who turn to life-writing projects to speak their truths about their identities, their families, their bodies, and their culture(s). This panel will consider the legacy of Cardinal’s text—the power of language in/and life-writing endeavors—in the domain of contemporary French and Francophone literature. How do contemporary women authors articulate “it” and in what words? What other types of voices (or languages) are woven into these stories of selfhood? Whom do these self-narratives address? To what extent do these literary examples offer catharsis? What can be said about women’s life writing and resistance as it pertains to language? Can the language of curative writing serve as a form of resistance? Please send 250-word proposals, in English or French, to Adrienne Angelo [email protected] by May 15, 2019.

 

LANGUAGE, GENRE, FORM, AND THE POETICS OF FRANCOPHONE FEMININE POWER 

WOMEN IN FRENCH

How do published books or studio-funded films, YouTube videos or online blogs, engage with existing power structures, fail to engage with them, or deliberately sidestep them?  How do these issues become even more complicated for female storytellers? Language has long been accepted in French and Francophone studies as tied to questions of power, identity, relationships and politics: French vs. English in Quebec, French vs. local languages in former colonies, the role of French as adopted tongue of immigrant writers, the creolization of languages in the Caribbean, the gendering of mother tongues and learned French. However, if one also understands language as a way of expressing oneself, of communicating ideas and feelings, then one must recognize that the form that language takes, through genre or media, is as meaningful as the word choices themselves. How do authors or storytellers follow or subvert generic conventions of poetry, novel, autobiography, essay, BD, oral folktale, etc? Whose generic conventions? How do these choices express identity, political opinions, or relationships between individuals or groups? How do female authors or storytellers in particular use language to disrupt or reify genre and/or form? How do they demonstrate their choices and what are the implications of those decisions? What does it mean to think about genre and form or media as kinds of language? This panel will explore how female authors of French expression use language–tongue, genre and/or form–to communicate and navigate these complicated questions of power, identity, and politics. Submissions from any time period and any part of the French-speaking world are welcome. Please send a 250-word proposal, in English or French, to Bethany Schiffman ([email protected]) by May 15, 2019

 

LAWRENCE'S LANGUAGE

D. H. LAWRENCE SOCIETY OF AMERICA

This panel welcomes abstracts on any aspect of D.H. Lawrence. By May 1, 2019, please submit 200-word abstract, brief biographical statement (inclusive of academic affiliation and contact information), and A/V requirements to Adam Parkes, University of Georgia, at [email protected].

 

LITERARY LANGUAGE AND ENVIRONMENTAL POWER
ASSOCIATION FOR THE STUDY OF LITERATURE AND THE ENVIRONMENT (ASLE)
This panel welcomes submissions on literary language and environmental power. Proposals addressing the conference theme are especially welcome. By June 13, please submit an abstract of 250 words, a brief bio, and any A/V requests to Kelly Walter Carney, Methodist University, at [email protected].

 

THE MANY LANGUAGES OF AMERICAN HUMOR

AMERICAN HUMOR STUDIES 

In Reinventing Comics: The Evolution of an Art Form (2000), Scott McCloud, speaking specifically of comics art, wrote, “Comics is a language. Its vocabulary is comprised of the full range of visual symbols [alphabetic, typographic, and pictorial] … both apart and in startling combinations” (1). Thinking broadly, for the purposes of this panel, we will consider languages as including those expressed verbally, visually, gesturally, or in any “startling combination.” This panel welcomes papers on any aspect of the many languages of American humor during different time periods, across different genres, as produced by varying cultures, as conveyed through any media or format, and as speaking to questions of power, identity and relationships … or not! By May 15, 2019, please submit a 250-word abstract, brief biographical statement (including academic affiliation and contact information), and A/V requirements to Anne Anderson, University of South Florida, at [email protected].

 

THE LANGUAGE OF EMILY DICKINSON

EMILY DICKINSON INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY

The Emily Dickinson International Society invites proposals that explore any aspect of Emily Dickinson’s language. We welcome creative works as well as projects by graduate students. We believe Dickinson’s work aligns especially well with the theme of this year’s SAMLA, which celebrates “languages, the ways we use them, the ways they use us, the ways they shape our realities.” 

By June 15, please send a 250-word abstract, a CV, and AV requests to Dr. Trisha Kannan at [email protected].

 

NORTH CAROLINA EXPATRIATE WRITERS

NORTH CAROLINA LITERARY REVIEW

The 2020 issues of the North Carolina Literary Review (NCLR) will feature the literature of expatriate North Carolina writers. In anticipation of this special feature topic, the editors are proposing a panel (or panels) at SAMLA of papers devoted to expatriate writers of North Carolina, which will also be considered for publication in NCLR. Please send 300-word abstracts to George Hovis at [email protected] by May 15. Papers are welcome on contemporary and earlier writers. A partial list of expatriate North Carolina writers includes the following: Charles W. Chesnutt, Allison Hedge Coke, Hannah Crafts, Moira Crone, Tony Earley, Ben Fountain, Matthew Griffin, Jim Grimsley, Garth Risk Hallberg, Tony Hoagland, Harriet Ann Jacobs, Gary Copeland Lilley, Kelly Link, Armistead Maupin, Kat Meads, Robert Morgan, Gwendolyn Parker, Dale Ray Phillips, David Sedaris, Monique Truong, Stephanie Powell Watts, and Marly Youmans.

 

POP SOUTH: TRANSLATING THE REGION
SSSL'S EMERGING SCHOLARS ORGANIZATION (ESO)
Keeping with SAMLA 91’s theme, this panel seeks abstracts linking the popularly imagined “South” to languages of power, identity, and relationship. We are interested in exploring how narratives from and about the “South” reveal power dynamics in the United States; how stories about the region can help us better understand lived experience and personal identity; and how conceptions of the “South” shed light on racial and social relationships. We welcome submissions focusing on a wide range of perspectives, but we especially seek to highlight work that challenges or disrupts long-established views of the “South” – which often characterize the region as a white, heteronormative, and agrarian space. We hope to illustrate how authors in a broad spectrum of mediums have spoken back against the perceived “norms” of Southern culture and identity, and we want to learn more about how these artists have used the media of popular culture to defy, destroy, or reshape limiting constructions of racial and social order. 
 While all papers should consider the topic of the “South” and popular media, other intersections might include: 
  • Aesthetics of southern Pop-iness 
  • The Queer or Quare South 
  • *The Urban South - Rural South – Gentrifying South 
  • Commodification of the South  
  • Representations of the South/southerness in national or global contexts 
  • Stereotypes of the South, and / or southern-made stereotypes 
  • Brandings of the South 
  • Accessibility of southern representations  
  • Popular representations of/in the Global South, Appalachian South, or Circum-Caribbean Souths 
  • *Conceptions of region and race or racelessness 
We welcome participants inside and outside of southern studies, as well as those who have wide-ranging conceptions of both “Pop” and “South. Please send 300-word proposals and A/V requirements to [email protected] by June 12, 2019.

 

POWER: ELEMENTS, ASPECTS, AND INSTANCES, IN MARK TWAIN STUDIES

THE MARK TWAIN CIRCLE OF AMERICA

The Mark Twain Circle invites papers for a panel at the SAMLA 2019 convention that analyze elements, aspects, and instances of power in Mark Twain’s works, including but not limited to his fiction, essays, or autobiography. This panel seeks papers that explore how power is presented in Twain’s works, who holds power, how it is maintained, how power is reinforced, challenged, subverted, or undermined. Other areas of interest include how power is determined or denied based on wealth, occupation, political advantages or disadvantages, gender, race, social status, or other factors, and how characters who lack power navigate within, around, or under powerful characters or institutions. Additional inquires might explore questions regarding the extent to which power contributes to a sense of personal, regional, or national identity, or whether language functions as an indication of power or powerlessness? Other inquiries regarding power are welcome as well. Please send a 150-250 word-abstract, short bio, and A/V requirements, by June 15, 2019, to Gretchen Martin, The University of Virginia’s College at Wise, [email protected].

 

POWER, IDENTITY, AND RELATIONSHIPS IN THE WORK OF AUGUST WILSON

AUGUST WILSON SOCIETY

August Wilson’s plays are powerful in their ability to center marginalized histories through performance and language. With the recent release of Denzel Washington’s award-winning film production of Fences (2016), and the award-winning Broadway production of Jitney (2016-2017), there has been renewed focus and interest in not only Wilson’s work, but also the Hill District, where Wilson lived and where all but one of his plays are set. 

The August Wilson Society seeks conference papers for our SAMLA panel that focus on how Wilson’s work defines power, relationships, and identity, both communally and individually. Topics that deal with August Wilson’s personal legacy in regard to the Hill District and his work are also welcome. All accepted presenters must be members of the August Wilson Society to participate. To become a member, please visit http://library.howard.edu/augustwilsonsociety/

Please submit a 250 word abstract and a brief bio to Chelsea Adams, University of Nevada Las Vegas, [email protected], by May 25, 2019.

 

POWER, IDENTITY, RELATIONSHIPS, AND T.S. ELIOT

T. S. ELIOT SOCIETY

This special panel sponsored by the International T. S. Eliot Society invites papers on Eliot’s life and work.  The SAMLA 91 theme – Languages: Power, Identity, and Relationships – invites us to examine in particular Eliot’s work in the context of questions of power and identity, but also where and how those questions intersect with relationships – with other people (individual and group), other cultural contexts, various ideas or disciplines, etc. 

The recent watershed of previously unpublished material from Eliot offers rich ground for exploring these “relationships,” and gives particular promise to this year’s topic.  It is an exciting time for Eliot scholarship, and we want to continue to build momentum.

By June 1, 2018, please submit, please submit a 300-word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Craig Woelfel, at Flagler College ([email protected]).

 

POWER, IDENTITY, AND RELATIONSHIPS IN THE WORKS OF CARSON MCCULLERS

THE CARSON MCCULLERS SOCIETY

The Carson McCullers Society is pleased to invite paper proposals for SAMLA 2019 on the conference theme of Language: Power, Identity, and Relationships. Proposals addressing any aspect of McCullers' life and works are welcome, especially those that contribute new understandings of how McCullers deploys language to institute, reify, challenge, and/or reconfigure power relations at the individual, communal, societal, national, or geopolitical levels. If interested, please submit a 300-word abstract and brief bio to Amber P. Hodges, Carson McCullers Society Secretary, at [email protected] by Monday, May 20, 2019. 

 

SOUTHERN PEDAGOGY: SOUTHERN STUDIES IN THE HUMANITIES CLASSROOM
SSSL'S EMERGING SCHOLARS ORGANIZATION (ESO)
Given the theme of SAMLA 91, the board of the Emerging Scholars Organization of the Society for the Study of Southern Literature invites you join our panel exploring the ways in which the study of the American and Global South features in explorations of power relationships in the humanities classroom. This panel welcomes abstracts that discuss how the historical and cultural study of the South, broadly defined, impacts student and teacher understandings of language and identity in modern networks of power. It is our hope that this panel will solidify an understanding of the South as a wide spectrum of lived experiences and the ways in which that understanding can help the teacher in the modern college classroom. The parameters of this panel are purposefully large, and college teachers of any discipline should feel free to submit a proposal concerning the ways they use the South to fruitfully engage students and develop their thinking and writing.
 
Papers can cover a wide range of topics relating to pedagogy and southern studies, but possible topics might include:
 
  • Activities and projects incorporating southern studies in wider humanities courses
  • Discussions of white supremacy and African-American studies through the southern lens
  • Incorporation of activism into a southern studies syllabus
  • Service learning as a means for developing praxis from discussions of power
  • Instances of using “The South” to illuminate student understanding of global power complexes 
We welcome teachers of all disciplines to our panel. Please send 300-word proposals and A/V requirements to [email protected] by June 12, 2019.
SOUTHERN STUDIES OUTSIDE THE ACADEMY
SOCIETY FOR THE STUDY OF SOUTHERN LITERATURE (SSSL)
This panel seeks work exploring the forms that our work must take and the functions it must perform outside traditional academic channels. The panel arrives at the convergence of an ongoing crisis in academic hiring and a time in which scholars across disciplines continue to look for ways to more urgently communicate the import of their work amid non-academic crises. The panel asks for work considering any of the following questions, and others:
 
  • What is the role southern studies might play in political advocacy at state, local, national, and/or hemispheric levels?
  • How can critics adapt their academic work for non-academic publication?
  • What sorts of emerging media allows us to helpfully translate our work? In what popular forms is our work most necessary? 
  • How might our pedagogy adapt to reflect the urgency of civic engagement for both undergraduate and graduate students?
  • How should our training of graduate students shift to reflect the present and likely future of academic hiring?  
  • What work might critics in the academy engage with more directly, and how would such engagement change the forms and functions of our work?
Other topics related to these lines of inquiry are welcomed. By June 3, please submit a 250-word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requests to Matthew Dischinger (Georgia State University) at [email protected].

 

SPACE, PLACE, AND TIME IN FRENCH AND FRANCOPHONE WOMEN'S NARRATIVES

WOMEN IN FRENCH

Power, identity and relationships often relate to place and, arguably, space. For example, questions of family and / or immigration seemingly involve not only these but the notion of time. This session proposes to investigate space, place, and time, and how these concepts play out in women’s narrative (texts or films). In what ways do women’s narratives create new understandings of space, place and time? In what ways might these spaces and places be gendered? And, in what way are they an experience of identity? Does women’s experience create a new space, place, or concept of time, and if so, in what ways? Please send a 250 word abstract in English or French to E. Nicole Meyer, Augusta University, [email protected] by May 15, 2019 along with presenter’s academic affiliation, contact information, and A/V requirements. 

 

SPEAKING OF GOD: POWER, IDENTITY, RELATIONSHIPS

SOUTHEAST CONFERENCE ON CHRISTIANITY AND LITERATURE

The nature of language has been an ongoing debate in philosophy and literary studies for decades. “Language speaks . . . . Mortals speak insofar as they listen,” said Heidegger in 1950. Fifteen years later, Oedipa Maas (in Pynchon’s The Crying of Lot 49) found herself haunted by the prospect of “having lost the direct, epileptic Word, the cry that might abolish the night.” The issue of language is nothing new for Christians, who have long (at least since Pseudo-Dionysius) wrestled with the relationship between words and the Word. “In the beginning was the Word,” our life and light, and yet our access to it remains constrained by our languages, conditioned and fluid as they are. 

This year’s SECCL-affiliated SAMLA panel will focus on the role of language in the divine-human relationship. Papers might focus on the following: the power and/or limits of language to speak about or commune with the divine; literary engagements with divine revelation; the relation between language and sacrament; language and idolatry; or other relevant topics. The panel welcomes papers from any theoretical approach. Creative writing submissions addressing the panel theme are also welcome.

Please send a 250-word proposal, a CV, and any A/V requests to Jordan Carson, Baylor University, [email protected]. (For creative writing submissions, please submit the full work to be read and not an abstract). All abstracts or creative writing submissions are due May 31.

 

STUDIES IN THE WORKS AND LIFE OF TRUMAN CAPOTE

TRUMAN CAPOTE LITERARY SOCIETY

This panel welcomes abstracts on the works and life of Truman Capote. By June 1, 2019, please submit a 250-word abstract, brief biographical statement (inclusive of academic affiliation and contact information), and A/V requirements to Stuart Noel, Georgia State University, at [email protected].

 

"THE TASK OF THE NEGRO WRITER AS AN ARTIST": LANGUAGE AS THE VEHICLE OF POWER AND IDENTITY CONSTRUCTION IN THE WORK OF LANGSTON HUGHES AND HIS CONTEMPORARIES

LANGSTON HUGHES SOCIETY

Throughout their lives, Langston Hughes and his contemporaries used language to represent the powerless and to speak truth to power in a highly discriminatory racial landscape. Hughes, for instance, often wrote to right wrongs and to bring attention to injustices such as the prosecution of the Scottsboro Boys. In I Wonder as I Wander(1956), Hughes reflects that he wanted “to write seriously and as well as I knew how to about the Negro people,” which was a theme he explored early in his career with “The Negro Artist and the Racial Mountain” (1926). Language was a mode through which he explored these lives and those he encountered in his travels. As Gene Andrew Jarrett argues, “Hughes’s understanding of Jim Crowism in the U.S. South informed the language he needed to interpret the social, class, or racial inequalities in countries located outside the U.S.” In time, Hughes honed that language to provide keen criticisms of oppression both nationally and internationally, often couched in humor, such as with his Simple stories.
In keeping with the SAMLA 91 conference theme, “Languages: Power, Identity, Relationships,” the Langston Hughes Society invites papers that explore “the power of language to change lives and make our world a better place for all.” Interested participants might want to consider, for instance, Hughes’ long-running column in the Chicago Defender that addressed current events or his work on the lynching culture throughout the United States. One might also consider the ways in which Hughes lent his poetry to specific causes such as the Spanish Civil War or Scottsboro. As always, papers examining all periods of Hughes’ career are welcome. Eager to examine the clear intersections between Hughes and other writers of his time, we also welcome proposals on his contemporaries—figures such as Claude McKay, whose “If We Must Die” became a rallying cry for many across the diaspora as they fought against cultural and political oppression—and those who carry on his literary legacy today. 
Please send proposals of no more than five hundred words (for a fifteen to twenty-minute paper) to Dr. Christopher Varlack, President ([email protected]) and Dr. Richard Hancuff, Secretary ([email protected]) no later than May 21, 2019, with a response expected no later than May 26, 2019. Note that in addition to paying the membership and registration fees for SAMLA, presenters must also be members of the Langston Hughes Society by the time of the conference in order to present. Please indicate any audio-visual needs (if essential) in your E-mail. For more information on the Langston Hughes Society and our ongoing work, please visit our website at www.LangstonHughesSociety.org.

 

THEMES OF POWER, IDENTITY, AND RELATIONSHIPS IN THE WORKS OF MIGUEL DE CERVANTES

CERVANTES SOCIETY

Cervantes’s life and works inspire a wide variety of theoretical approximations, some of which focus on themes such as power, identity, and relationships. Within these approximations, more specific analyses investigate the powerful vs. the powerless, subjective vs. objective identities, hegemonic vs. subaltern or marginalized figures, and the complexities of interpersonal, cultural, class, race, professional, and other relationships. These are very timely topics for today’s societies, and when thematically framed by the blurring of reality and fantasy, particularly poignant Cervantine themes begin to resonate.

Considering how these and other academic and popular culture resonances have manifested over the past four hundred years, how did Cervantes approach power thematically within his work and how has his work been classified as powerful? How did he utilize, manipulate, hide, or define identities and how have Cervantine narrative identities been manipulated or changed, especially in imagery and cultural production? How did he render relationships within his works and how has the concept of relationships—as defined by present-day theories—been interpreted within Cervantine works?

The Cervantes Society of America at SAMLA 91 welcomes papers that examine ways in which Miguel de Cervantes’s works can be explored through the themes of power, identity and relationships. 

Please submit, by e-mail, a 200-word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements by May 31, 2019 to the chair, Daniel Holcombe ([email protected]).

 

THE UNCERTAINTY SOCIETY

The Uncertainty Society is a reflection of our times. The poets involved in the Uncertainty movement first made themselves know in the USA in the anthology Poetry Facing Uncertainty, published in 2012. This year, we anticipate having guest poets from Spain, Mexico, Colombia and Central America. Presentations that deal with the poetry of uncertainty as it relates to societal issues, social media, electronic publishing, the visual arts and music will receive special consideration.

The special focus for SAMLA 90 is Languages: Power, Identity, and Relationships, an exploration of how language shapes our lives, selves, and communities. Please send presentations that will fit within the framework of this theme. The program will be crafted from the submissions received. The number of presenters will determine the length of the presentations; they are usually 15-20 minutes.

Please send proposals and representative selections to: Dr. Gordon E. McNeer at [email protected]. ]

 

"YOU MARK MY WORDS": EUDORA WELTY, DIALECT, AND RELATIONSHIPS

EUDORA WELTY SOCIETY

Eudora Welty used dialect in her stories to reproduce the full performance of power and identity associated with language. Of her early stories, Welty herself said in 1982, "I love to write dialogue but it’s very hard to prune it and make it sharp and make it advance the plot and reveal the characters—both characters—the one listening and the one talking. You can use it to do all kinds of things. I like to do it because it’s hard, I guess. I really like it. I laugh when I write those things."

Today, the southern dialect invokes a region that is notorious for slavery, Jim Crow, the struggle for equality, poverty, and resistance to social progress. Thus, listeners (or here, readers) often have negative connotations influencing their impressions of a southern speaker’s ethics, politics, socio-economic status, and intellect. However, within the south, native southerners can hear the differences in dialects that signal much more specific markers of identity. The delta dialect is noticeably different than the Appalachian dialect that is different from the southern coastal dialect. Likewise, southerners of the upper classes carry their own “monied sounds” that melodiously tell listeners that the speaker comes from the wealthy, ruling class. Thus, one’s dialect and grammar structures place speakers regionally as well as in such ready-made identity markers as race and class. Perhaps because of these ready-made identities built into dialects, Eudora Welty uses dialogue and dialect to capture the power dynamics at play in the South, even as she layers her characters with the assumed identities that dialects carry.

In Welty's short stories and novels, her use of dialogue is key to interpreting her characters as fully-rounded people. For example, in Delta Wedding and Losing Battles, a great proportion of the text is dialogue, and that dialogue works to show interpersonal relationships between and among more- and less-established members of the Fairchild or Vaughn family. In the story "Petrified Man," dialogue establishes rank within the social hierarchy of a women's beauty salon.

To explore the loaded assumptions of identity that language carries, this panel seeks papers that focus on Welty and her masterful work in the context of languages, power, identity, and relationships. Papers may focus on this constellation of themes in any of Welty's works. This panel also welcomes papers focusing on the nonverbal "language" of Welty's photography.

Send abstracts of around 300 words to Susan Wood ([email protected]) or Ren Denton ([email protected])