AFFILIATED GROUP SESSIONS

  
ADAPTATION STUDIES

ASSOCIATION OF ADAPTATION STUDIES

This session welcomes submissions on any aspect of adaptation studies. This year's SAMLA theme is LANGUAGES: POWER, IDENTITY, RELATIONSHIPS, which seems wonderfully in harmony with adaptation studies. Certainly, a text and another text that adapts it are part of a linguistic relationship of power and identity, reveals new dimensions, meanings, nuances, and revelations among texts. Proposals addressing the conference theme are especially welcome, but by no means required. By May 25, 2019, please submit an abstract of 75 words, a brief bio, and any A/V requests to Dennis R. Perry, Adaptation Studies, at [email protected].

 

ALONE! MARGINALITY OF WOMEN'S VOICES TODAY

WOMEN IN FRENCH 

Since the emergence of Femen or the #Me Too campaign, the collective feminist movements have taken over new ways and forms of expression. While these discussions are now even more accessible to people and often appear universal, this panel will investigate the special case of intentionally marginalized feminine speaking, in its form and content, in the contemporary French and francophone literature. Examining singular identities revealed by such writings, the papers will consider the strength of the words, expressed not in the interest of a group but for the sake of an individual. What is characteristic of the language of these women, authors and characters, when they state isolated claims? What is the nature of their complaints and accusations? How do the deeds become words and what are their consequences? Do these women’s voices find in their marginality, assumed or endured, a positive source of power or, on the contrary, does this power play out in a negative way? Finally, do these writings echo (maybe despite themselves) the collective feminist movements or, on the contrary, do they find a legitimacy asserting their unique story? These are some questions this panel proposes to consider. Please send a 250-word abstract in English or French to Julie Crohas Commans, Auburn University, [email protected]auburn.edu by May 15, 2019 along with presenter's academic affiliation, contact information, as well as a short biography and A/V requirements.

 

BITING BACK: EMPOWERMENT IN THE WORKS OF FRANCOPHONE WOMEN WRITERS 

WOMEN IN FRENCH

In keeping with the purpose of SAMLA 91 to “celebrate languages, the ways we use them, the ways they use us, the ways they shape our realities,” this Women in French panel welcomes papers that investigate how Francophone writers employ French—the language of the oppressor but also a language of liberation—in order to reclaim their own cannibal(ized) language, identity, and power. As Valérie Loichot contends in The Tropics Bite Back, “While cannibalism is one of the main controlling images forced onto the Caribbean and its inhabitants, Caribbean writers have also reclaimed it as a privileged mode of cultural resistance, or eating back” (xxvi). Of particular interest in this panel are papers that examine how Francophone women writers have cannibalized French language, history, and literature to rewrite and reimagine the lives of their predecessors and give them the personal voices and subjectivities History denies them. How have they used the power of language to rewrite history and re`affirm a tradition of resistance? How is writing in French, refusing to write in French, or crafting a unique language a means to chart new territories for Francophone women writers? Please send a 250-word abstract in French or English to Delphine Gras ([email protected]) by May 15, 2019.

 

CEA AT SAMLA

COLLEGE ENGLISH ASSOCIATION (CEA)

The College English Association solicits abstracts from its members on the special focus of the 91st SAMLA conference from November 8-10 in Atlanta: “Languages: Power, Identity and Relationships.” Presentations that celebrate “the power of language to change lives and make our world a better place for all” are particularly welcome.

Proposals can be pedagogical in nature or relate to any aspect of English studies. Scholars may also submit papers that are beyond this scope and/or unrelated to the SAMLA theme. 

Please send abstracts and any A/V requirements to Marissa Glover McLargin, Secretary, Florida CEA, at [email protected] by May 17, 2019. More information on the SAMLA conference may be found at https://samla.memberclicks.net/.

Steve Brahlek, CEA Director of Technology, is also soliciting original works of fiction, poetry, or non-fiction for a second panel. Kindly send proposals directly to him at [email protected] by May 17.

 

CONFRONTING LANGUAGE FACE-TO-FACE: PEDAGOGICAL ROUNDTABLE ON CRITICAL REFLECTION

WOMEN IN FRENCH 

“Reflection makes all of us self-aware. It challenges us to think deeply about how we learn and why and why not. [It] deepens ownership [and] helps us get comfortable with uncomfortable. Perhaps most importantly, reflection helps us advocate for ourselves and support others.” –Angela Stockman

The language classroom is a site of multiple encounters where successes and failures emerge when instructor, student, and language come face-to-face with each other. At their best, the outcomes can be sweet and inspirational, but at their worst, they can be discouraging and even disheartening. Critical reflection can be an effective tool to help both instructor and student navigate the waters of language learning and process their encounters. It can guide students to better understand the transformations within themselves, as well as others, so that they become more responsible, more open-minded, and more compassionate citizens of the world.

In this session, participants will present the ways that they implement critical reflection in French language classes, as well as the results that ensue. Questions to be considered can include, but are not limited to, the following: How is critical reflection implemented in language courses? What methods are used, and why? What challenges arise when students confront their experience with language face-to-face? What constitutes a successful confrontation? When is this practice unsuccessful?

Please send a 250-word abstract in English or French by 15 May 2019 along with the presenter’s academic affiliation and contact information to Jodie Barker: [email protected].

 

ELIZABETH MADOX ROBERTS: INSIGHT AND REFLECTION

ELIZABETH MADOX ROBERTS SOCIETY

Papers for this session may deal with all aspects of Roberts’ work and life. Suggested topics include, but are not limited to, the following: Roberts and new work; Roberts and manuscripts; Roberts in the context of Southern literature; Roberts and Southern Agrarianism; Roberts’ literary and stylistic influences; Roberts and religion; Roberts and Modernism; Roberts and Regionalism; Roberts and the politics of literary reputation; Roberts and feminism; and, Roberts and Kentucky. Papers engaging directly with the conference theme are also strongly encouraged. Abstracts should be 250 words and sent, by May 27th, to Jamie Stamant, Agnes Scott College, at [email protected].

 

FLANNERY O'CONNOR: LANGUAGES AND POWER, IDENTITY, AND RELATIONSHIPS

FLANNERY O'CONOR SOCIETY

The Flannery O’Connor Society invites papers on topics relevant to the SAMLA 91 conference theme: “Languages: Power, Identity, Relationships,” especially those that examine the ideas of political, religious, or spiritual power, race and/or dialect, irony and parody, the grotesque, low and high art, disability, or language and religion in the life and works of Flannery O’Connor. Please, send 300-word abstracts by May 15, 2019, to Cameron Lee Winter, University of Georgia, at [email protected]. Please also include a brief bio and any A/V requirements in your abstract.

 

FLANNERY O'CONNOR: OPEN TOPIC

FLANNERY O'CONNOR SOCIETY

The Flannery O’Connor Society invites papers on any topic in the life and works of Flannery O’Connor. Please, send 300-word abstracts by May 15, 2019, to Cameron Lee Winter, University of Georgia, at [email protected]. Please also include a brief bio and any A/V requirements in your abstract. 

 

GIVING VOICE TO THE VOICELESS

WOMEN IN FRENCH

This session aims to interrogate how French and Francophone women’s narrative (texts or films) portrays the marginalized, the repressed, and/or the underrepresented. Presentations will investigate works of authors/filmmakers who made themselves a spokesperson for the voiceless, casting light on stories that otherwise would have remained unheard within their own communities as well as globally. What does it mean to be “voiceless,” and how do these authors/filmmakers give value to the experiences of these people who, for lack of authority, education, or economic means, are not able to convey them on their own? Topics may include but are not limited to life-writing, translation, postcolonial and gender studies. Please send a 250-word abstract in English or French to Viviana Pezzullo, [email protected] by May 15, 2019, along with presenter’s academic affiliation, contact information, and A/V requirements.

 

LANGUAGE AND LIFE WRITING: WOMEN'S WORDS TO SAY IT IN CONTEMPORARY FRENCH AND FRANCOPHONE LITERATURE

WOMEN IN FRENCH

Marie Cardinal’s 1975 autobiographical novel, Les Mots pour le dire, marked a turning point in the landscape of women’s life-writing projects within French culture. By employing a first-person voice to document the narrator’s analysis while at the same time to re-create or re-imagine her memories, this narrative broke the silence, shame, and guilt of a complicated mother-daughter relationship and, in so doing, allowed the author/narrator insight into her corporeal and subjective truths. Les Mots pour le dire also tied the personal to the political. All of these narrative pathways have since been explored to different ends by contemporary women writers who turn to life-writing projects to speak their truths about their identities, their families, their bodies, and their culture(s). This panel will consider the legacy of Cardinal’s text—the power of language in/and life-writing endeavors—in the domain of contemporary French and Francophone literature. How do contemporary women authors articulate “it” and in what words? What other types of voices (or languages) are woven into these stories of selfhood? Whom do these self-narratives address? To what extent do these literary examples offer catharsis? What can be said about women’s life writing and resistance as it pertains to language? Can the language of curative writing serve as a form of resistance? Please send 250-word proposals, in English or French, to Adrienne Angelo [email protected] by May 15, 2019.

 

LANGUAGE, GENRE, FORM, AND THE POETICS OF FRANCOPHONE FEMININE POWER 

WOMEN IN FRENCH

How do published books or studio-funded films, YouTube videos or online blogs, engage with existing power structures, fail to engage with them, or deliberately sidestep them?  How do these issues become even more complicated for female storytellers? Language has long been accepted in French and Francophone studies as tied to questions of power, identity, relationships and politics: French vs. English in Quebec, French vs. local languages in former colonies, the role of French as adopted tongue of immigrant writers, the creolization of languages in the Caribbean, the gendering of mother tongues and learned French. However, if one also understands language as a way of expressing oneself, of communicating ideas and feelings, then one must recognize that the form that language takes, through genre or media, is as meaningful as the word choices themselves. How do authors or storytellers follow or subvert generic conventions of poetry, novel, autobiography, essay, BD, oral folktale, etc? Whose generic conventions? How do these choices express identity, political opinions, or relationships between individuals or groups? How do female authors or storytellers in particular use language to disrupt or reify genre and/or form? How do they demonstrate their choices and what are the implications of those decisions? What does it mean to think about genre and form or media as kinds of language? This panel will explore how female authors of French expression use language–tongue, genre and/or form–to communicate and navigate these complicated questions of power, identity, and politics. Submissions from any time period and any part of the French-speaking world are welcome. Please send a 250-word proposal, in English or French, to Bethany Schiffman ([email protected]) by May 15, 2019.

 

LAWRENCE'S LANGUAGE

D. H. LAWRENCE SOCIETY OF AMERICA

This panel welcomes abstracts on any aspect of D.H. Lawrence. By May 1, 2019, please submit 200-word abstract, brief biographical statement (inclusive of academic affiliation and contact information), and A/V requirements to Adam Parkes, University of Georgia, at [email protected].

 

POWER: ELEMENTS, ASPECTS, AND INSTANCES, IN MARK TWAIN STUDIES

THE MARK TWAIN CIRCLE OF AMERICA

The Mark Twain Circle invites papers for a panel at the SAMLA 2019 convention that analyze elements, aspects, and instances of power in Mark Twain’s works, including but not limited to his fiction, essays, or autobiography. This panel seeks papers that explore how power is presented in Twain’s works, who holds power, how it is maintained, how power is reinforced, challenged, subverted, or undermined. Other areas of interest include how power is determined or denied based on wealth, occupation, political advantages or disadvantages, gender, race, social status, or other factors, and how characters who lack power navigate within, around, or under powerful characters or institutions. Additional inquires might explore questions regarding the extent to which power contributes to a sense of personal, regional, or national identity, or whether language functions as an indication of power or powerlessness? Other inquiries regarding power are welcome as well. Please send a 150-250 word-abstract, short bio, and A/V requirements, by May 1, 2019, to Gretchen Martin, The University of Virginia’s College at Wise, [email protected].

 

POWER, IDENTITY, RELATIONSHIPS, AND T.S. ELIOT

T. S. ELIOT SOCIETY

This special panel sponsored by the International T. S. Eliot Society invites papers on Eliot’s life and work.  The SAMLA 91 theme – Languages: Power, Identity, and Relationships– invites us to examine in particular Eliot’s work in the context of questions of power and identity, but also where and how those questions intersect with relationships – with other people (individual and group), other cultural contexts, various ideas or disciplines, etc. 

The recent watershed of previously unpublished material from Eliot offers rich ground for exploring these “relationships,” and gives particular promise to this year’s topic.  It is an exciting time for Eliot scholarship, and we want to continue to build momentum.

By June 1, 2018, please submit, please submit a 300-word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Craig Woelfel, at Flagler College ([email protected]).

 

POWER, IDENTITY, AND RELATIONSHIPS IN THE WORKS OF CARSON MCCULLERS

THE CARSON MCCULLERS SOCIETY

The Carson McCullers Society is pleased to invite paper proposals for SAMLA 2019 on the conference theme of "Language: Power, Identity, and Relationships." Proposals addressing any aspect of McCullers' life and works are welcome, especially those that contribute new understandings of how McCullers deploys language to institute, reify, challenge, and/or reconfigure power relations at the individual, communal, societal, national, or geopolitical levels. If interested, please submit a 300-word abstract and brief bio to Isadora J. Wagner, Carson McCullers Society President, at [email protected]by Monday, May 20, 2019. 

 

SPEAKING OF GOD: POWER, IDENTITY, RELATIONSHIPS

SOUTHEAST CONFERENCE ON CHRISTIANITY AND LITERATURE

The nature of language has been an ongoing debate in philosophy and literary studies for decades. “Language speaks . . . . Mortals speak insofar as they listen,” said Heidegger in 1950. Fifteen years later, Oedipa Maas (in Pynchon’s The Crying of Lot 49) found herself haunted by the prospect of “having lost the direct, epileptic Word, the cry that might abolish the night.” The issue of language is nothing new for Christians, who have long (at least since Pseudo-Dionysius) wrestled with the relationship between words and the Word. “In the beginning was the Word,” our life and light, and yet our access to it remains constrained by our languages, conditioned and fluid as they are. 

This year’s SECCL-affiliated SAMLA panel will focus on the role of language in the divine-human relationship. Papers might focus on the following: the power and/or limits of language to speak about or commune with the divine; literary engagements with divine revelation; the relation between language and sacrament; language and idolatry; or other relevant topics. The panel welcomes papers from any theoretical approach. Creative writing submissions addressing the panel theme are also welcome.

Please send a 250-word proposal, a CV, and any A/V requests to Jordan Carson, Baylor University, [email protected]. (For creative writing submissions, please submit the full work to be read and not an abstract). All abstracts or creative writing submissions are due May 31.

 

STUDIES IN THE WORKS AND LIFE OF TRUMAN CAPOTE

TRUMAN CAPOTE LITERARY SOCIETY

This panel welcomes abstracts on the works and life of Truman Capote. By June 1, 2019, please submit a 250-word abstract, brief biographical statement (inclusive of academic affiliation and contact information), and A/V requirements to Stuart Noel, Georgia State University, at [email protected].

 

THEMES OF POWER, IDENTITY, AND RELATIONSHIPS IN THE WORKS OF MIGUEL DE CERVANTES

CERVANTES SOCIETY

Cervantes’s life and works inspire a wide variety of theoretical approximations, some of which focus on themes such as power, identity, and relationships. Within these approximations, more specific analyses investigate the powerful vs. the powerless, subjective vs. objective identities, hegemonic vs. subaltern or marginalized figures, and the complexities of interpersonal, cultural, class, race, professional, and other relationships. These are very timely topics for today’s societies, and when thematically framed by the blurring of reality and fantasy, particularly poignant Cervantine themes begin to resonate.
 
Considering how these and other academic and popular culture resonances have manifested over the past four hundred years, how did Cervantes approach power thematically within his work and how has his work been classified as powerful? How did he utilize, manipulate, hide, or define identities and how have Cervantine narrative identities been manipulated or changed, especially in imagery and cultural production? How did he render relationships within his works and how has the concept of relationships—as defined by present-day theories—been interpreted within Cervantine works?
 
The Cervantes Society of America at SAMLA 91 welcomes papers that examine ways in which Miguel de Cervantes’s works can be explored through the themes of power, identity and relationships. 
 
Please submit, by e-mail, a 200-word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements by May 31, 2019 to the chair, Daniel Holcombe ([email protected]).

 

"YOU MARK MY WORDS": EUDORA WELTY, DIALECT, AND RELATIONSHIPS

EUDORA WELTY SOCIETY

Eudora Welty used dialect in her stories to reproduce the full performance of power and identity associated with language. Of her early stories, Welty herself said in 1982, "I love to write dialogue but it’s very hard to prune it and make it sharp and make it advance the plot and reveal the characters—both characters—the one listening and the one talking. You can use it to do all kinds of things. I like to do it because it’s hard, I guess. I really like it. I laugh when I write those things."

Today, the southern dialect invokes a region that is notorious for slavery, Jim Crow, the struggle for equality, poverty, and resistance to social progress. Thus, listeners (or here, readers) often have negative connotations influencing their impressions of a southern speaker’s ethics, politics, socio-economic status, and intellect. However, within the south, native southerners can hear the differences in dialects that signal much more specific markers of identity. The delta dialect is noticeably different than the Appalachian dialect that is different from the southern coastal dialect. Likewise, southerners of the upper classes carry their own “monied sounds” that melodiously tell listeners that the speaker comes from the wealthy, ruling class. Thus, one’s dialect and grammar structures place speakers regionally as well as in such ready-made identity markers as race and class. Perhaps because of these ready-made identities built into dialects, Eudora Welty uses dialogue and dialect to capture the power dynamics at play in the South, even as she layers her characters with the assumed identities that dialects carry.

In Welty's short stories and novels, her use of dialogue is key to interpreting her characters as fully-rounded people. For example, in Delta Wedding and Losing Battles, a great proportion of the text is dialogue, and that dialogue works to show interpersonal relationships between and among more- and less-established members of the Fairchild or Vaughn family. In the story "Petrified Man," dialogue establishes rank within the social hierarchy of a women's beauty salon.

 To explore the loaded assumptions of identity that language carries, this panel seeks papers that focus on Welty and her masterful work in the context of languages, power, identity, and relationships. Papers may focus on this constellation of themes in any of Welty's works. This panel also welcomes papers focusing on the nonverbal "language" of Welty's photography.

Send abstracts of around 300 words to Susan Wood ([email protected]) or Ren Denton ([email protected])