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INTERDISCIPLINARY SESSIONS

 

ADAPTATION STUDIES

ASSOCIATION OF ADAPTATION STUDIES

This session welcomes submissions on any aspect of adaptation studies. This year's SAMLA theme is Languages: Power, Identity, Relationships, which seems wonderfully in harmony with adaptation studies. Certainly, a text and another text that adapts it are part of a linguistic relationship of power and identity, reveals new dimensions, meanings, nuances, and revelations among texts. Proposals addressing the conference theme are especially welcome, but by no means required. By May 25, 2019, please submit an abstract of 75 words, a brief bio, and any A/V requests to Dennis R. Perry, Adaptation Studies, at [email protected].

 

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE

This Regular Session welcomes submissions on any aspect of Comparative Literature. Proposals addressing the SAMLA 91 conference theme, Languages: Power, Identity, Relationships, are especially welcome. By June 13, 2019, please submit an abstract of 250-words, a brief bio, and any A/V requests to Kelly Walter Carney, Methodist University, [email protected].  

 

CONTEMPORARY ANGLOPHONE LITERARY FICTION (2009-2019)

This panel welcomes presentations on literary fiction produced in the last decade (2009-2019). As we come to the end of the 2010s, what do different works of literary fiction represent, problematize, and critique? How has contemporary literary fiction continued to shift political, social, and cultural questions? As the SAMLA 91 conference description notes, "we believe in the power of language to change lives and make our world a better place for all.” How has literary fiction of the 2010s produced such language and power? Arising in contemporary studies is the phrase “literary activism.” How is this playing out in pieces of literary fiction produced in the last decade? Abstracts (100-250 words) may be submitted to Preston Taylor Stone (Univ of Miami) at [email protected] with the subject “SAMLA 91” on or before May 15, 2019.

 

DARWINIAN LITERARY THEORY

Proposals for papers exploring any aspect of Darwinian Literary Studies, theoretical or applied, are invited. Textual analyses should be grounded in contemporary research from relevant areas of evolutionary biology and/or evolutionary psychology. Submit 250-word abstract and brief bio by May 25 to [email protected], with cc. to [email protected].

 

DH PROJECTS IN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE: THE STATE OF THE FIELD
This roundtable invites lightning talks presenting current projects that employ DH methodologies to analyze humanities data. We welcome proposals for short presentations (7-10 minutes) of DH projects in any stage of development, related to the study of language and/or literature. Proposals may be pedagogy- or research-oriented. Projects might include:
  • Digital archives
  • Network analysis
  • Data visualizations
  • Spatial humanities
  • Text mining
  • Humanities gaming
  • Etc.
Please submit 250-word abstract, short bio, and AV requests to Elizabeth Coggeshall ([email protected]) by June 10, 2019.

 

ELEPHANTS IN THE ROOM: ADDRESSING RACE AND RACISM IN MEDIEVAL STUDIES AND STUDIES OF THE U.S. SOUTH
SSSL'S EMERGING SCHOLARS ORGANIZATION (ESO)
In the wake of Christchurch and Charlottesville, it has become apparent that white supremacists are using the language, power, and identity of medieval Europe and the Southern United States to justify violence. In the interest of exploring the role of teachers and researchers of spatial and chronological geographies such as Medieval and southern studies, Medieval and Renaissance Interdisciplinary Studies (MARIS) at Louisiana State University and the Emerging Scholars Organization (ESO) of the Society for the Study of Southern Literature invite proposals from scholars and teachers that answer the following questions: 
 
- How do you ethically research within a field whose subjects and objects of study have been constructed to maintain discriminatory epistemologies of race, region, nationalism, and religion? 
 
- How do you ethically teach the history and memory of literary periods for which many popular audiences have embraced manufactured nostalgia that so often whitewashes public histories and memories?
 
- When and where should researchers and teachers of Medieval and southern studies address the institutionalization of race and racism in their disciplines? How does or doesn’t it serve the academy, and the broader public, to do so?
 
To include a broad range of perspectives, we plan a roundtable with 6-8 scholars offering 5-7 minute presentations. Please submit a 250-word abstract, brief bio, and AV requirements by June 1st, 2019, to Joshua Ryan Jackson ([email protected]), Gayle Fallon ([email protected]), and Kelly Vines ([email protected]).

 

THE HOLOCAUST AND LANGUAGE, POWER, AND IDENTITY

HOLOCAUST LITERATURE AND FILM

This panel invites papers on representations of the Holocaust in 20th and 21st-century texts or films. Topics might include but are not limited to power dynamics between marginalized groups in camps and ghettos, relationships of survivors to their children and grandchildren, and language as a means of sustaining connection to one’s identity. Paper proposals addressing the SAMLA91 theme, "Languages: Power, Identity, Relationships," are especially welcome. By May 31, please submit an abstract of 200-300 words, a brief bio, and any A/V requirements to Courtney Ferriter, University of North Georgia, [email protected] and Luke Wilson, Florida Atlantic University, [email protected].

 

 

LANGUAGE AS AN INFLUENCE ON ATTITUDES, VALUES, AND SELF IN FILM, LITERATURE, DRAMA, AND POPULAR CULTURE

Language can be a powerful force: it has the ability to gain power over others, be it political or personal; it can be manipulated to show how we want others to view and evaluate ourselves and how others perceive us; and it can demonstrate how a reader or viewer evaluates a character. Factors exerting such influence include diction, accent, and dialect. This panel will explore how language choice, spoken or written, is used by authors, playwrights, or screenwriters, with special emphasis on how language can influence readers’ or viewers’ perceptions and evaluations of characters. This session welcomes submissions on any aspect of language including considerations of reification, discourse analysis, accent perception, conversational analysis, and sociolinguistics.Please submit an abstract of 200-350 words, a brief bio, and any AV requests by May 30th to [email protected].

 

THE LANGUAGE OF FLÂNERIE: FORGING POWER, IDENTITY, AND RELATIONSHIPS ON THE CITY STREETS

FLÂNERIE IN LITERATURE & POPULAR CULTURE

Celebrating its fifth consecutive year at SAMLA, this regular session on flânerie will continue to explore the topic of urban walking in literature, art, and popular culture. As a concept that emerged in 19th-century accounts of the modern European metropolis, flânerie is a practice rooted in the effort to enjoy, better understand, and improve the city experience. Walking and moving through urban spaces are also techniques that facilitate self-knowledge, reflection, and awareness. This panel seeks papers that examine how flânerie intersects with one or more of the SAMLA 2019 conference themes—language, power, identity, and relationships. Possible questions to address are:

Language:

  • What is the particular language of flânerie?
  • How is flânerie narrated or captured in words and texts?
  • What is the relationship between walking and words?

Power:

  • How is flânerie an exercise in power?
  • What is the power-relation between the flâneur/flâneuse and the city?
  • What is the power-relation between the flâneur/flâneuse and the crowd?

 Identity:

  • How does the flâneur/flâneuse figure define his/her identity vis-à-vis the city, the crowd, commodity culture, etc.?
  • What is the flâneur/flâneuse ́s identity in terms of gender, class, age, nationality, sexual orientation, political orientation, etc.
  • When and how is flânerie an act of self-creation, self-erasure, or self-transformation?

Relationships:

  • How do alternative forms of flânerie (running, cycling, locomotion, driving) produce different kinds of relationships between the flâneur/flâneuse and the city or the crowd?
  • What forms of art (literature, graphic, digital, media, dance, fashion) express flânerie as a means of transforming the world, on a global or local level?
  • What is the relationship between the flâneur/flâneuse and the marketplace? Does flânerie require a productive or consumptive relationship to the marketplace or the multitude?

DEADLINE JUNE 1, 2019. By this date, please send abstracts of 250-500 words along with AV requests and a short bio to Kelly Comfort, Georgia Tech, [email protected] and Marylaura Papalas, East Carolina University, [email protected].

 

THE LANGUAGES OF FASHION: STYLE, EXPRESSION, AND IDENTITY

This panel explores fashion as a system of language, expression, production and consumption. Examining both textual and graphic representations of fashion, we seek papers that engage with the 2019 SAMLA conference themes of language, power, identity and relationships. Approaches that examine how fashion, dress, design and style are a means of exercising and maintaining power, forging identity, and affecting relationships are welcome. Papers on gendered dressing, (un)fashionable identities, anti-fashion, and various kinds of fashion (or fashionable) relationships during the Victorian, Modern, or contemporary eras are welcome. We also encourage submissions that examine sartorial themes in literature, theater, art, film, photography, design, periodicals, digital media, and other aesthetic modes of expression. Questions that might be addressed include:

  • What are the languages of fashion, and what do they communicate? In addition to textual and visual, what other expressions of fashion exist?  
  • How effective is fashion as a form of power? What are the movements and social formations showing meaningful connections between aesthetics and politics, particularly as related to dress and style? 
  • How have artists and writers incorporated fashion and dress in their work as a means to express identity, both on a personal and on a collective level?
  • How has fashion shaped relationships or emerged as an important component of relationships? 

By May 24, 2019, please send abstracts of 250-500 words along with AV requests and short bio to both Loretta Clayton, Middle Georgia State University, at [email protected] and Marylaura Papalas, East Carolina University, at [email protected].

 

THE LANGUAGE OF THE VISUAL AND TWENTIETH-CENTURY TRANSATLANTIC VANGUARDISMS
This panel explores the power of image culture in shaping the visual identity of twentieth-century transatlantic vanguardisms. Since the inception of European experimentalism during the first decades of the twentieth century, a series of art movements engaged in radical art production that defied conventions. From the Cubist adoption of multiple viewpoints, through the Futurist celebration of technology and speed, the Expressionist distortion of form, to the Dadaist sense of provocation and the irrational juxtaposition of images in Surrealism, visual art has set precedents for literature on an international level of exchanges. Thanks to venues that exhibited the work of European expatriates, namely the Armory Show and Alfred Stieglitz’s gallery 291, along with journals such as Camera Work,American Modernists reinvented their own expressive language by rethinking the sense of place. Meanwhile, the Argentinian ultraístas, the Mexican estridentistas and muralistas as well as the Peruvian group of the journal Amauta, among others, took advantage of European experimentalism and their pre-Columbian past to reflect on the convulsive reality of Latin America. Based on the ideas of vision, visuality and visualization, topics might include, but are not limited to the following:
 
—The visual content of the manifesto as a revolutionary form of protest.
—Cinema celebrity culture and the male gaze.
—The fusion of verbal and visual codes: photo-poetry and cinepoetry.
—The literary adaptation of the snapshot, the montage and the close up.
—Ekphrastic literature on films, photographs and comic characters in the Hollywood industry.
—The visual provocation of avant-garde soirees.
—Transatlantic vanguardism and print culture.
—Underlying ideologies of public images.
—Graphic humor and the grotesque in the avant-garde.
—Mass media and consumer society.
 
By May 31st, 2019, please submit a 300-word abstract in English or Spanish along with a brief bio and A/V requirements to Leticia Pérez Alonso ([email protected]), Jackson State University.

 

LIFE WRITING

If “our language is our identity,” as the SAMLA 91 conference call for panels notes, then considering how we narrate our lives is of the utmost importance. In the decades since the “memoir boom” around the turn of the millennium, it has become commonplace to consider the production of identities and subjectivities across narrative spheres and histories: from genres like captivity narratives, slave narratives, and commonplace books, to contemporary iterations in memoir, blogs, social media, and reality television, it is obvious that life writing matters. Life narratives demand that readers attend to histories, lives, languages, and experiences that are often unfamiliar or different from their own. This panel welcomes presentations on any aspect of life writing, and those projects that are related to the conference theme, “Languages: Power, Identity, Relationships,” are especially welcome. Please submit a 250-word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requests to Nicole Stamant, Agnes Scott College, [email protected] by May 30, 2019.

 

 

LITERARY MONSTERS

MONSTERS

In today's culture, it's almost impossible to avoid "monsters."  Straight from mythology and legend, these fantastic creatures traipse across our television screens and the pages of our books. Over centuries and across cultures, the inhuman have represented numerous cultural fears and, in more recent times, desires. They are Other. They are Us. This panel will explore the literal monsters--whether they be mythological, extraterrestrial, or man-made--that populate fiction and film, delving into the cultural, psychological and/or theoretical implications.

Please submit a 250-300 word abstract, a brief bio, and any A/V needs by May 20, 2019 to Kelly Saderholm at [email protected]. SAMLA will be held at the Westin Peachtree Plaza Atlanta, Georgia this year from November 15-17.  Those accepted must be members of SAMLA to present.

 

MEDIEVAL ERA AND THE OTHER IN CONTEMPORARY
RE-INVENTING GREAT BOOKS
Although the era formerly known as the “Dark Ages” has more recently been called “medieval,” recent references to the age in popular culture such as the film Pulp Fiction or even the success of the restaurant chain Medieval Times indicates the extent to which the Medieval Era remains for us more an imaginary construct than a clearly definable historical epoch.  Often depicted in terms of religiosity, brutality, and chivalry in equal measure, recent representations of the medieval emphasize certain aspects of the era while repressing the complexity of medieval life as it was lived.
 
This session invites submissions for twenty-minute, scholarly presentations on the connections between the medieval past andour current political climate, such as consideration of the alt-right’s appropriation of medieval symbols and other imaginings of the medieval that contain nationalistic or racist sentiments. We are equally interested in representations of the medieval that have been appropriated for progressive politics, or even representations that provide greater nuance than typical contemporary representations allow for.
 
Possible topics may include (but are not limited to) themes of diaspora, exile and refuge, and comparative medievalisms. By June 15, please submit a 300-word abstract, a brief bio, and A/V requirements to Rebecca Flynn, Georgia Gwinnet College, [email protected].
 

METAMODERNISM

In 2010, Timotheus Vermeulen and Robin van den Akker published their "Notes on Metamodernism," which outlined the phase of literature and society following Postmodernism. This session invites papers exploring metamodern readings of literary and social movements and metamodern identity creation. Being a movement with a "self" at the heart, the conference theme lends itself particularly well to metamodern interpretations, and proposals addressing that theme are especially welcome. By June1st, please submit an abstract of 250 words to Rachel Perry, Auburn University, at [email protected].

 

MODERN DRAMA
MODERN DRAMA
This Regular Session welcomes submissions on any aspect of Modern Drama. Proposals addressing the SAMLA 91 conference theme—Languages: Power, Identity, Relationships—particularly as it relates to intersectional identity formations, are especially welcome. By June 10, 2019, please submit an abstract of 250-300 words, a brief bio, and any A/V requests to Ms. Kimber Wiggs ([email protected]) and Mr. Will Forde-Mazrui ([email protected]). 

 

THE MODERN INDIGENOUS NOVEL: WHAT'S THIS ABOUT, WHO WROTE IT, AND WHY?

This panel seeks papers and presentations about novels written by Indigenous authors that focus on any aspect of Indigeneity related to modern or recent times. Scholars with an interest in literature written by Indigenous authors writing about indigenous issues exceptional and unique to Australia, New Zealand, Europe, Latin America and Asia, along with Canada, Mexico, the United States and other parts of North America are especially encouraged to submit abstracts.

Please submit a 300-500 word abstract, a brief bio and/or resume or CV, as well as A/V requirements by June 1st, 2019, to Dr. David C. Muller at Georgia Southern University: [email protected].

 

MUSLIMS IN AMERICA

This panel intends to examine the works of Muslim American poets, novelists, playwrights, jazz musicians, punks, hip hop artists, mipsters, filmmakers, and visual artists, through the lens of polylingualism. Papers are invited that explore the diverse compositions of Muslim American identities in cultural texts as they engage with the multiple vocabularies of national, theoretical, literary, and aesthetic spaces. With the theme of SAMLA 91, Languages: Power, Identity, Relationships, panelists are asked to consider how these writers and artists employ different languages in their articulation of assimilation, alterity, dissent, and transgression as Muslim Americans in high or low art forms. Please submit a 300-word abstract, with a short biography and A/V requirements, to Mahwash Shoaib ([email protected]) by July 7.

 

NEOLIBERALISM IN LITERATURE AND MEDIA STUDIES

Once considered a fringe movement, neoliberalism has steadily become a central tenet of American life. Neoliberal thought subsequently spread across the globe in a variety of forms (via channels including Hollywood and regulatory bodies such as the International Monetary Fund). Promises of privatization today trump collective action in virtually every aspect of life. This epistemic shift can be felt far and wide, from politicians to postmodern theorists. This panel will investigate symptoms of – and responses to – this shift in the areas of literature and media studies. Given the conference theme, papers of particular interest might address the intersection of neoliberalism and issues of language, identity, power, and/or relationships. By June 1st, please send a 250-word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Michael Blouin, Milligan College, [email protected].

 

ON ENDS AND ENDINGS

This panel aims to explore the rhetoric of ends and endings, whether they be concrete and material (the end of a book) or more contentious and conceptual (the end of an era). How do we talk about endings when they arrive? And how can language claim power over events by pronouncing them finished? Potential paper topics might include periodization and historiography, "late" style, life-writing and reflections on mortality, apocalyptic fiction and the anthropocene, or simply the famous last words to a novel. Ideally, the ends and endings we discuss will not be presumed and treated simply as content, but will instead help us think about our desire for (and fear of) the sense of an ending.

Abstracts, limited to 300 words, should be sent along with a CV to Ian Afflerbach at [email protected].

 

 

THE REPRESENTATION OF POWER AND AUTHORITY IN ITALIAN AND/OR SPANISH CINEMA
This panel welcomes papers on representations of power and authority in Italian and/or Spanish cinema. Of special interest are papers that interpret the role of aesthetical and/or technical practice that help portray hierarchical and symbolic relationships of power and authority. 200-word abstracts may be submitted in English, Italian, and Spanish by June 13th, 2019, to Ivano Fulgaro, The University of Alabama, at [email protected]. Please also include a brief bio, academic affiliation, and any A/V requirements in your abstract.

 

SPEAKING OF GOD: POWER, IDENTITY, RELATIONSHIPS

SOUTHEAST CONFERENCE ON CHRISTIANITY AND LITERATURE

The nature of language has been an ongoing debate in philosophy and literary studies for decades. “Language speaks . . . . Mortals speak insofar as they listen,” said Heidegger in 1950. Fifteen years later, Oedipa Maas (in Pynchon’s The Crying of Lot 49) found herself haunted by the prospect of “having lost the direct, epileptic Word, the cry that might abolish the night.” The issue of language is nothing new for Christians, who have long (at least since Pseudo-Dionysius) wrestled with the relationship between words and the Word. “In the beginning was the Word,” our life and light, and yet our access to it remains constrained by our languages, conditioned and fluid as they are.

This year’s SECCL-affiliated SAMLA panel will focus on the role of language in the divine-human relationship. Papers might focus on the following: the power and/or limits of language to speak about or commune with the divine; literary engagements with divine revelation; the relation between language and sacrament; language and idolatry; or other relevant topics. The panel welcomes papers from any theoretical approach. Creative writing submissions addressing the panel theme are also welcome.

Please send a 250-word proposal, a CV, and any A/V requests to Jordan Carson, Baylor University, [email protected]. (For creative writing submissions, please submit the full work to be read and not an abstract). All abstracts or creative writing submissions are due May 31.

 

SPECULATIVE FICTION

Speculative fiction covers a broad range of narrative styles and genres. The cohesive element that pulls works together under the category is that there is some “unrealistic” element, whether it’s magical, supernatural, or a futuristic/technological development: works that fall into the category stray from conventional realism in some way.   For this reason, speculative fiction can be quite broad, including everything from fantasy and magical realism to horror and science fiction—from China Miévilleto Margaret Atwood to Philip K. Dick. This panel aims to explore those unrealistic elements and all their varied implications about society, politics, economics, and more.

Please submit a 250-300 word abstract, a brief bio, and any A/V needs by May 20, 2019 to Lisa Wenger Bro, Middle Georgia State University, at [email protected].

 

THE UNCERTAINTY SOCIETY

The Uncertainty Society is a reflection of our times. The poets involved in the Uncertainty movement first made themselves know in the USA in the anthology Poetry Facing Uncertainty, published in 2012. This year, we anticipate having guest poets from Spain, Mexico, Colombia and Central America. Presentations that deal with the poetry of uncertainty as it relates to societal issues, social media, electronic publishing, the visual arts and music will receive special consideration.

The special focus for SAMLA 90 is Languages: Power, Identity, and Relationships, an exploration of how language shapes our lives, selves, and communities. Please send presentations that will fit within the framework of this theme. The program will be crafted from the submissions received. The number of presenters will determine the length of the presentations; they are usually 15-20 minutes.

Please send proposals and representative selections to: Dr. Gordon E. McNeer at [email protected].

 

VISUAL AND TEXTUAL ART: NEGOTIATIONS OF POWER, IDENTITY, AND RELATIONSHIPS 
POPULAR CULTURE AND FILM
Considering the conference theme “Language: Power, Identity, Relationships,” our session welcomes submissions on the topics of Relational Aesthetics, the alter-modern, or on any art/text interface involving “meaning-making” through the contextual exploration and perception of texts and symbols. This might include looking at the way texts encourage, among other things, certain unveiling processes which potentially lie in back of subjective perceptions of “other.” Any considerations of how a text can have multiple simultaneous meanings or any consideration of how visual art interfaces with textual intentions or receptions are especially welcome as are any submissions touching on aspects of power, identity or relationships in the intersection, broadly construed, of visual and textual art.  Please send abstracts of about 150 words by June 11th to [email protected].

 

 

VOICES AND NARRATIVES OF MIGRATION: MOVEMENTS AND CROSSINGS FROM LATIN AMERICA TO UNITED STATES

UNDERGRADUATE PANEL

Movements and crossings from Latin America to United States has always been a central topic in the political agenda of both countries. The Honduras Caravan is one of the recent movement heading towards USA that allows us to rethink about this topic. This session focuses on the relationships between USA and Latin America to seek to understand how people of Latin America have been represented in USA by the media (and in any cultural production) and how their voices and narratives have been (in-)visibilized. This session welcomes any cultural production embedding but not limited to literature, poetry, films and media, artifacts, photography, plays and more but an interdisciplinary approach is also encouraged. A comparative approach is especially welcome with other nationalities/cultures involved with the theme or through different cultural productions or disciplines. 
 
The presentations may include but are not limited to the following topics: 
-United States and Honduras Caravan Latino/a and United States
-Media and Migration
-Globalization and Migration 
-Power and Migration
-Politics and Migration 
-Migration and Gender Studies 
-Art and Migration 
Please send a 150-200 words abstract in English, Spanish or Portuguese by May 31, 2019 along with a short bio and A/V requirements to Dr. Stefania Licata: [email protected]

 

WHAT IF HILARY HAD WON? A UCHRONIC EXPLORATION OF THE ALTERNATE HISTORY GENRE

What if Islam dominated the globe? What if Japan conquered Australia? What if the Martin Luther King, Jr. had survived assassination? What if the South won the American Civil War? What if the Nazis had won World War Two? Indeed: what if Hillary had won?

This panel will discuss the Uchronic genre as it pertains to alternate history narratives, particularly those focused on Asia, Australia, India, Africa, the Middle East and Latin America . This panel invites papers that address issues such as what is an alternate history narrative? What is meant by the term “Uchronic”? How are alternate history novels different from dystopian/utopian novels, fantasy or science fiction? How do prominent examples of the genre such as Lion’s Blood and Zulu Heart by Stephen Barnes, Abdourahman Waberi’s French novel In the United States of Africa,It Can’t Happen Hereby Sinclair Lewis, Philip Roth’s The Plot Against Americaor Michael Chabon’s The Yiddish Policemen’s Unionrelate to and intersect with the modern political climate and/or inform our understanding of the Uchronic alternate history genre.

Papers that address the titular question – What if Hillary had won? – or any others issues or themes related to Uchronic alternate history narratives and counterfactual essays are sought after, as well as critiques and analysis of page-to-screen adaptations of alternate history narratives such as Philip K. Dick’s The Man in the High Castle, Len Deighton’s SS-GBand Robert Harris’ Fatherland. Of particular interest are papers that address alternate history Uchronic narratives focused on Africa, Asia, Australia, the Middle East and/or Latin America, and/or on Muslim-centric worlds. Papers and presentations that discuss issues beyond alternate histories of the American Civil War and World War Two are especially encouraged.

Please submit a 300-500 word abstract, a brief bio and/or resume or CV, as well as A/V requirements by June 1st, 2019, to Dr. David C. Muller at Georgia Southern University: [email protected].