Affiliated Group Sessions

 

American Association for Italian Studies (AAIS)

This panel invites paper submissions about the teaching of Italian, including topics around interdisciplinary practice and pedagogy, teaching developments in the field, curriculum reform, assessment, and community engaged learning.  In keeping with the SAMLA 2015 theme, we especially welcome papers that explore the role of music, dance, architecture, painting, film, literature, and other arts in language pedagogy.  By June 26, 2015 please submit a 300-word abstract and A/V requirements to Christine Ristaino, Emory University, at cristai@emory.edu.

 

American Association of Teachers of German (AATG) 

Literature and the Other Arts in the German Studies Classroom: Interdisciplinary Pedagogy and the Curriculum

The AATG-sponsored panel invites contributions that may focus, for example, on the role of
- visual and performance arts in German Studies courses, both in terms of content study as well as pedagogy.
- curriculum reform in German Studies  - in view of challenges and opportunities in the academy and beyond.
- interdisciplinary pedagogy in support of a discipline-specific identity for German Studies at the post-secondary level
- community engagement as practice and pedagogy in German Studies and within the range of local to global contexts.
By June 15, 2015, please submit a 200-word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Sabine H. Smith, Kennesaw State University at ssmith2@kennesaw.edu with “SAMLA: Literature and the Other Arts” in the subject line. 

 

American Association of Teachers of Spanish and Portuguese (AATSP)

This panel welcomes papers about the teaching of Spanish and Portuguese, including evaluation of initiatives taken in a department, a program, or an individual course; studies on second language acquisition; and reflections on changes in the field. In keeping with the SAMLA 2015 theme, we especially welcome papers that involve integrating music, dance, painting, film, literature, and other arts in language pedagogy. By June 1st, please submit an abstract of up to 300 words to Katherine Ostrom, Emory University, at kostrom@emory.edu.

 

American Humor Studies Association

20th Century American Authors and Their Other Art

This panel welcomes papers about any aspect of 20th century American Authors. Paper proposals addressing the SAMLA 87 theme are especially welcome. By May 15, 2015, please submit a 100 word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Jules Hojnowski at jah11@cornell.edu.

 

American Humor Studies Association

Humor in Social Media

This panel welcomes papers about any aspect of social media. Paper proposals addressing the SAMLA 87 theme are especially welcome. By May 15, 2015, please submit a 300 word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Joseph Alvarez at jalvarez@carolina.rr.com.

 

Association of Adaptation Studies

Adaptation in Concert

In celebration of SAMLA 87’s emphasis on relations between literature and the other arts, this series of panels welcomes papers about any aspect of adaptation. Proposals may include analyses of specific adaptations (in accord with the much-maligned case study model), more general arguments about the relation of literature as such to cinema, comic books, music, performance, or the other arts (in accord with the equally maligned medium-specific model), or other approaches emphasizing the transfer of material between literature and other media or the place of literature within the broader media landscape. Please submit a 300-word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements by 15 June 2015 to Thomas Leitch, University of Delaware, at tleitch@udel.edu.

 

Association of Adaptation Studies

Studies in Film Authorship

Who makes movies, what does it mean to be the author of a movie, and what is the relation between film auteurs and film authors? In accord with SAMLA 87’s emphasis on the relations between literature and the other arts, proposals are invited in any area of film authorship, especially those that consider the varying modes of authorship across different media, the ways authorship intersects with institutional and production practices in the film industry, debates concerning different candidates for authorship (directors, producers, screenwriters, performers, studios, and so on), the use and abuse of models for film authorship based on assumptions about authorship in literature and the other arts, and the relationship between textual ontology and the status of authorship. Please submit a 300-word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements by 15 June 2015 to Thomas Leitch, University of Delaware, at tleitch@udel.edu.

 

Association for the Study of Literature and the Environment

Can Arts Save the Earth?

Poetry most certainly can restore our attention to the environment, as John Filstiner contends in Can Poetry Save the Earth?: A Field Guide to Nature Poems. Other artists join poets in speaking for the natural world, helping to make us better stewards of the earth by drawing our attention to it. The theme of SAMLA 87, In Concert: Literature and the Other Arts, resonating with the title of ASLE's journal, INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES IN LITERATURE AND THE ENVIRONMENT, invites us to consider how all the arts help us to visualize and understand the landscape, weather, wildlife, our desecration of the earth. This session invites papers exploring ways that the arts--literature, film, music, photography, sculpture, painting, dance, architecture--heighten our awareness of the environment. Papers analyzing interdisciplinary creativity, such as paintings or film inspired by literature of any genre, are especially welcome. By June 10, 2015, please send a 300-word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Rebecca Godwin, Barton College, at rlgodwin@barton.edu.

 

Carolinas Writing Program Administrators

This panel welcomes papers about any aspect of writing of the Carolinas Paper proposals addressing the SAMLA 87 theme are especially welcome. By June 1, 2015 please submit a 300-word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Tracy Ann Morse, morset@ecu.edu.

 

The Carson McCullers Center for Writers and Musicians/Carson McCullers Society

McCullers and the Arts

In light of the conference theme of “In Concert: Literature and the Other Arts,” the Carson McCullers Center for Writers and Musicians and the Carson McCullers Society invites papers that explore the ways in which McCullers’ work and life is in dialogue with diverse modes of artistic expression. Her own early interest in music is reflected in much of her work, and many of her novels have been adapted to the screen or stage. Contemporary artists and playwrights like Suzanne Vega and Sarah Gubbins are interacting with and reinventing McCullers’ legacy in new and innovative ways through their own work. Further, the recent release of the Dr. Mary Mercer/Carson McCullers Collection at Columbus State University holds exciting potential for fresh insight into McCullers’ work and life, and perhaps new understandings of the connections between archival materials and creation and performance. Presentations about McCullers and her work that are not directly related to the conference theme are also welcome. By June 10, 2015, please submit a 300-word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Casey Kayser, University of Arkansas, at ckayser@uark.edu.

 

Cervantes Society of America

The Works of Miguel de Cervantes

In commemoration of the 400th anniversary of the publication of Part Two of Don Quijote, this panel welcomes papers on the works of Miguel de Cervantes with emphasis on the relations between literature and the other arts such as cinema, comic books, painting and theater. Please submit a 250-word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements by 15 June 2015 to Carmela Mattza at cmattza@lsu.edu.

 

Charles W. Chestnutt Association

Charles Chestnutt and Vernacular Culture

Charles W. Chesnutt frequently likened racial identity to a theatrical performance which varies according to audience and custom. In his efforts to articulate the humanity of African descended peoples and to disrupt the racial logic of the nineteenth and early twentieth century, Charles W. Chesnutt collected and curated African American folklore and vernacular culture, re-visioning and reinscribing the material to artistically support his efforts. The Charles W. Chesnutt Association will host a panel discussion exploring how African American vernacular art and expression is utilized in the various genres in which he worked. Papers exploring Chesnutt's use of African American vernacular art and papers addressing this year’s theme, "In Concert: Literature and the Other Arts" are all strongly encouraged. Please e-mail proposed paper abstracts of not more than 300 words along with a short biography of not more than 150 words and any A/V requirements to Darren Elzie (University of Memphis) at djelzie@memphis.edu not later than June 15, 2015. The Charles W. Chesnutt Association will host this panel discussion November 13-15, 2015 at SAMLA 87 which will take place at the Sheraton Imperial Hotel & Convention Center in Durham, North Carolina.

 

College English Association

Claudia Emerson: In Memoriam

Claudia Emerson, 2006 Pulitzer Prize for Poetry winner for her collection Late Wife and former Poet Laureate of Virginia, passed away last year at the age of 57 after a valiant struggle against cancer. She and her husband, Kent Ippolito, a musician, wrote songs together and performed. Emerson’s work, then, embodies this year’s SAMLA theme of “In Concert: Literature and the Other Arts.” This panel seeks to celebrate her life, so papers on any element of her art are most welcome. Please send abstracts of no more than 500 words and any A/V requirements to Lynne M. Simpson, Prof. of English, Presbyterian College, at lsimpson@presby.edu by June 5.

 

D.H. Lawrence Society of America

D.H. Lawrence: The Art of Living Through the Arts

Papers should explore connections between D. H. Lawrence's writing and his participation in and/or reflections on other arts, specifically painting, music, and/or Native American dancing. By June 15, please submit a 300-word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Katherine Toy Miller, D. H. Lawrence Society of North America, at mkaattoy@gmail.com. Current SAMLA membership and conference registration are required to participate in the conference.

 

The Dickens Society

Dickens and the Arts

This panel, organized by The Dickens Society, welcomes proposals for papers on any aspect of the topic of Dickens and the arts. Please send proposals (300 words maximum) and a one-page CV to Iain Crawford, University of Delaware, icrawf@udel.edu, by May 15, 2015.

 

Edith Wharton Society

Writing (of) Women’s Bodies: Wharton and Early Twentieth-Century Feminism

In keeping with the SAMLA theme, “In Concert: Literature and other Arts,” this panel seeks papers which consider Edith Wharton’s work in the context of the growing voice of feminism of her time. In this panel, we are interested in papers which explore the connections between Wharton’s treatment of female bodies and the context of early twentieth century feminism. We encourage a broad interpretation of this theme, including (but not limited to) the role of sexuality in her work, to her work as a war correspondent, to even the material realities of her characters’ lives. By June 15, 2015, please submit a 250-300 word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Monica Miller, monica.miller@lmc.gatech.edu.

 

Elizabeth Madox Roberts

Music & Muses in the Poetry and Fiction of Elizabeth Madox Roberts

Paper topics for this session may deal with music and performance in the works of Elizabeth Madox Roberts, including (but not limited to): Roberts and Music; Roberts and Folksong, Folktales, or Folk-speech; Performances in Roberts’ writing; Music and Poetry in Roberts; Hymns and Roberts; or other music- or performance-related topics found in Roberts’ writing. Abstracts should be 250 words and sent by May 30, 2015 to Gregg Neikirk, session chair, Westfield State University, at gneikirk@westfield.ma.edu.

 

Elizabeth Madox Roberts Society

Elizabeth Madox Roberts: Prospect & Retrospect

Papers for this session may deal with all aspects of Roberts’s work and life. Suggested topics include, but are not limited to, the following: Roberts and new work (particularly her posthumously published unfinished novel Flood); Roberts and her manuscripts; Roberts in the context of Southern literature; Roberts and Southern Agrarianism; Roberts and Regionalism; Roberts and Kentucky; Roberts’ literary and stylistic influences (i.e., Synge, Hardy, Joyce, Homer, Hopkins, Beethoven, Pound); Roberts and religion; Roberts and Modernism;  Roberts and feminism; Roberts and the novel; Roberts as poet; Roberts as writer of short fiction; and, Roberts and the politics of literary reputation. Abstracts should be 250 words and sent by May 30, 2015 to Amanda Capelli (U of Louisiana-Lafayette) at axc7464@louisiana.edu.

 

The Ernest Hemingway Society

Hemingway and Religion

In an unsent letter to Father Vincent C. Donovan in 1927, Ernest Hemingway wrote how he always had “more faith than intelligence or knowledge” and that he “never wanted to be known as a Catholic writer.” He said that he had known the “importance of setting an example” but that he was a “very dumb Catholic” with “so much faith” that he hated to “examine into it.” Religion throughout Hemingway’s work is one of the more complex and fundamental aspects of his fiction. This panel will consider religion in Hemingway’s writing and life. Topics may include (but are not limited to) the following: Hemingway’s Protestant upbringing; his conversion to Catholicism; his marriage to Pauline; his interest in pilgrimages and religious places; faith as a subject in his fiction; religious rituals and traditions; medieval sources; mysticism; saints; religion and place; religion and politics; the soul; despair; love; intersections of the sacred and the profane; Hemingway and other religious writers; etc. By 1 June 2015, please send a title and 250-word abstract to Matthew Nickel, Misericordia University, at mnickel@misericordia.edu.

 

The Ernest Hemingway Society

Hemingway & SAMLA: Then & Now

This roundtable includes a consideration of the presence of the Ernest Hemingway panels at SAMLA over the decades. For further information, please contact Matthew Nickel at mattcnickel@gmail.com

 

Eudora Welty Society

Eudora Welty and Intertextuality

Keeping with the conference theme of "Literature and the Other Arts," The Eudora Welty Society invites papers that explore multimodality and interdisciplinary collaboration within the works of Eudora Welty. What elements in Welty's fiction, essays, or photography connect to her contemporary moment or a timeless part of human nature? Examples might concern the role of and engagement with politics, jazz and the blues, newspaper and magazine, television and film, translation of oral fairy tales into a written medium or Welty's Robber Bridegroom into a play. We are also interested in papers that discuss other artists intertextually reimagining Welty's texts, such as Claire Holley's song "Pleasant Dreams" inspired by "The Whistle." By June 1, 2015, please send a 300-500 word abstract, a brief bio, and any A/V requirements to Susan Wood at swood1@go.olemiss.edu.

 

Feministas Unidas

Hispanic/Latino Postfeminist Biopics, Media Representations, and Adaptations

This panel includes interdisciplinary approaches to Hispanic/Latino performative subjects in a variety of literary, cultural, and multimedia representations. Alternative cultural readings informed by life writing theory, gender and sexualities, media and cinema studies, and/or popular culture studies, among others will provide the framework to consume alternative biopics. Media representations and literary and/or cultural adaptations include fiction and non-fiction biopics, biographical comics, docudramas, auto/biographical video-textures, photographic portraits, digital archives, corporeal markers as signatures, drawings or sketches, architectural sites, decorative arts as biographical mappings, among other non-canonical biographical narratives. Films, documentaries, graphic biographies, visual journals, animation, and/or cultural artifacts constructing a non-canonical biopic will be also considered. Please send a 250-word proposal by June 1 to:  Professor Magdalena Maiz-Peña at Davidson College at mapena@davidson.edu. Presenters will need to be members of SAMLA and of Feministas Unidas.

 

Film Studies Group

Performance on Film

This panel welcomes papers about any aspect of "Performance on Film," defined broadly.  Paper proposals addressing the SAMLA 87 theme are especially welcome.
Possible topics could include:
*actor studies

*ensemble performance
*documentary performance
*"liveness"
*concert or dance films
*stand-up comedy performance
*stunt, pornographic, or other "extreme embodied" performance
*Method, Delsarte, or other schools of film performance
*abstract performance
*disability performance
*portrayals of living persons
*playing with or against "type"
*film performance vs. performance in theater, television, radio, online
*performances of authority
*post-human performance
*silent era performance
*naturalist performance and its alternatives
*historical or national differences in film performance
*performance as labor

By May 15, please submit a 500-word abstract and brief bio to Erin Lee Mock, University of West Georgia, at emock@westga.edu.

 

Flannery O’Connor Society

New Approaches to Flannery O’Connor

This session welcomes papers about any fresh approach to the study of the fiction of Flannery O'Connor. Papers addressing the SAMLA 87 theme are especially welcome. By 25 May 2015, submit an abstract of up to 500 words, a brief bio, and A/V requirements to Marshall Bruce Gentry, Georgia College, at bruce.gentry@gcsu.edu.

 

Georgia and Carolinas College English Association (GACCEA)

Carnivalization and Carnivalesque

For its 2015 SAMLA panel, the Georgia and Carolinas College English Association seeks proposals that address the theme of carnivalization and the carnivalesque. As articulated by Mikhail Bakhtin, “carnival celebrated temporary liberation from prevailing truth and from established order; it marked the suspension of all hierarchical rank, privileges, norms, and prohibitions. Carnival was the true feast of time, the feast of becoming, change, and renewal. It was hostile to all that was immortalized and completed.” Topics include but are not limited to:

- the liberating subversion of popular humor on the literary and cultural tradition
- the overturning of hierarchies in popular carnival
- the mingling of the sacred and the profane, the sublime and the ridiculous
- the usurpation of power
- the scatological
- the grotesque
- open/dialogic or polyphonic genres, esp. in satire and the novel
- alternative voices versus authoritative, official culture
- transgression of genres and gender roles
By May 29th, please submit abstracts to Lee Brewer Jones, Department of English, GPC Online: lee.jones@gpc.edu. 

 

The H.D. International Society

H.D. and Her Circle: New Directions

This panel focuses on work by H.D. and/or those in her circle (Bryher, Kenneth MacPherson, Marianne Moore, Richard Aldington, John Cournos, Robert Herring, Ezra Pound, Paul and Eslanda Robeson, etc.). The thematic focus is open to a range of new approaches, with particular preference to papers that, per the conference theme, address connections to other art forms/media. Please send 250-word abstracts, a brief bio, and A-V requests to Rebecca Walsh, Co-Chair (with Celena Kusch) of The H.D. International Society, at rawalsh@ncsu.edu by June 10, 2015. 

 

International James Joyce Foundation

Joyce and Pornography

James Joyce and Nora Barnacle’s visible sexuality is well documented in their biographies. Gordon Bowker reports, “In Locarno, at the Pension Daheinm, Nora was enjoying herself […]. She relaxed by reading a book sent by Jim (probably Venus in Furs) by their favourite pornographer. ‘I am very glad to get it, especially as it is by Masoch,’ she wrote, and teased him with hints of flirtations by beginning one letter, ‘Dear Cuckold.’” (Leopold von Sacher-Masoch: from whom the term masochism is derived.) The intertextual/autobiographical connections between James and Nora’s sex lives, Masoch’s Venus in Furs, and the sexual nature of Joyce’s characters are impossible to ignore. Even Nora addressing a letter to James, “Dear Cuckold” expresses a dynamic between them of female sexual dominance and male humiliation. We won’t forget, in Krafft-Ebing’s definition of masochism, by which Joyce contracts his hero Leopold Bloom, he writes, “he pointed out particularly that the humiliation connected with these imaginary acts was the principal attraction.” And as Karen R. Lawrence reminds us in her essay, “Joyce and Feminism,” “We might remember that in Finnegans Wake one of the names for James Joyce is ‘Shames Voice.’” This panel is interested in presentations that study the connections between Joyce and pornography. Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

- the effect of pornography on Joyce’s works and characters;

- pornographic themes of voyeurism;

- Leopold von Sacher-Masoch’s Venus in Furs;

- male gaze;

- power/pleasure dynamics;

- queer sexuality;

- a berrant sexual behavior in Joyce’s personal life;

- charges of obscenity;

- and more

Please email an abstract of no more than 250 words and a brief bio to eek2ju@virginia.edu. Deadline of submission: May 31, 2015.

 

International Society for Travel Writing

Southern Travel Writing and the “Other” Arts

Southern Travel Writing and the “Other” Arts will reflect the larger conference theme, as painting, sculpture, photography, book making, music, dance, film, architecture, and the like manifests themselves in or become the center for travel writing about the Southern United States or the global South.  Papers may draw from a variety of approaches, although preference will be given to papers that discuss ideas suggested by the conference theme.  Preference will be given to papers that address non-fictional travel narratives, or that address fictional travel narratives in the context of theoretical or critical approaches to travel literature. Please submit electronically (Microsoft Word or PDF) abstracts of 250-350 words to Russ Pottle, International Society for Travel Writing, at rpottle@misericordia.edu.  Abstracts should include submitter’s name, title, institutional affiliation, and contact information.  Deadline for abstract submissions is 15 June 2015.  Notification will be made by 19 June 2015.  Information about the SAMLA conference is available at http://samla.gsu.edu/.

 

International Vladimir Nabokov Society

Nabokov on Politics

In a later preface to Bend Sinister (1947), Vladimir Nabokov claims, “The influence of my epoch on my present book is as negligible as the influence of my books, or at least of this book, on my epoch.” The conventional reading of Nabokov as an aesthete who is insistent upon sharp divisions between fictional and political worlds has its principal source in the author’s stylization of his own career. Yet this way of reading Nabokov has been complicated through such recent studies as Andrea Pitzer’s The Secret History of Vladimir Nabokov. Despite the many ways that the novelist spurned the literature of “social comment” and “human affairs,” his fiction regularly alludes to communist regimes, political dilemmas, and the horrors of European fascism. What are we to make of Nabokov’s disavowal in light of the political detail populating much of his work? How does the political figure into fiction that the author so vehemently presented as Art for Art’s sake? Reading against the grain of Nabokov’s insistence, what political histories influence his impressive career as a writer? This panel invites papers to explore these and other questions regarding the political in Nabokov’s fiction, whether through his short stories and novels dealing directly with political themes (e.g. Bend Sinister or the collection Tyrants Destroyed), or through the subtle detail and allusions signaling that politics haunts his work. Following the theme of SAMLA 87, papers may also consider the connections between Nabokov’s political fictions and the other arts. How, for instance, does Nabokov’s interest in film inform his American career? Or what influence might his interest in painting and sculpture have upon his political thought? Please submit a CV and abstracts of no more than 300 words to Benjamin Mangrum, bmangrum@email.unc.edu, by June 14, 2015.

 

James Dickey Society

James Dickey and His Heirs

The James Dickey Society regular session seeks proposals for presentations on literary relationships between Dickey and subsequent American writers. Examples of possible approaches include studies of specific related works, introductions of new writers influenced by Dickey, broader considerations of Dickey’s place in or influence on the development of American literature, and explorations of specific personal interactions between Dickey and other authors, or between authors responding to Dickey’s influence.  Proposals related to genres other than fiction, as well as relevant creative work, are welcome also. Please email abstracts and either a cover letter or 2-page CV by June 15, 2015, to the James Dickey Society at jamesdickeyreview@lynchburg.edu.

 

John Dos Passos Society

John Dos Passos and the Other Arts

John Dos Passos was undoubtedly one of the most eclectic American writers of his generation. Faithful as he was to the intermedial aesthetics of modernism, he did not limit himself to the role of novelist, but frequently also crossed over into the neighboring arts: as an accomplished painter and illustrator, as a playwright and sometime set designer for the New Playwrights Theatre, and through his work on Hollywood cinema and documentary film. The resulting cross-pollination would fuel Dos Passos's creativity over the years, influencing his most celebrated novels. In keeping with this year's conference theme, this panel invites proposal for twenty-minute papers that explore aspects of Dos Passos's enduring commitment to "the other arts." Topics may include, but are not limited to, the following:
- his actual work within the other arts
- the influence of the other arts on his work as a novelist
- his engagement with modernist theory and practice: montage, simultaneity, defamiliarization, etc.
- his interest in visual, popular, and commercial culture
- points of affinity with his contemporaries across the arts: Eisenstein, Picasso, Tzara, etc.
- his relationship to the multi-modal artistic movements of the day: futurism, surrealism, cubism
For consideration, please submit a 300-word abstract and a brief bio (in Word format) to JDPSociety@gmail.com no later than June 1, 2015. Be sure to note any A/V requirements, should they be needed.

 

Joseph Conrad Society of America

"To Make you Hear, To Make You Feel… To Make you See.”

In keeping with the conference theme of Literature and the Other Arts, The Joseph Conrad Society of America invites proposals that explore cross- and inter-disciplinary approaches to, or alternate mediations of, text within the works of Joseph Conrad.  This may include (but is not limited to) novel approaches to criticism, mediations of text (for example, via film, theater, the press, or graphic novel), or creative responses of other artists to Conrad’s work.  Please submit 300 word proposal abstracts, and a brief bio (in Word format) to dmulry@ccga.edu no later than June 1, 2015. If there are likely to be any A/V requirements, please note those in your proposal.

 

Keats-Shelley Association of America

Romanticism and the Arts

Romanticism and the Arts, an affiliated session of the Keats-Shelley Association of America at the South Atlantic Modern Language Association Conference in Durham, North Carolina, USA (13-15 Nov. 2015). This panel seeks papers related to second-generation Romantic-era British writers and/or their literary circles, so proposals addressing the works of John Keats, Percy and Mary Shelley, Lord Byron, Leigh Hunt, and William Hazlitt will receive priority. Proposals that engage with the conference theme (“In Concert: Literature and the Other Arts”) are especially welcome. Subjects to be considered might include (but are not limited to) Romantic literature in relation to music, concerts, songs, painting, engravings, caricatures, drawings, panoramas, book arts, calligraphy, dance, theatre, opera, architecture, sculpture, china, pottery, ceramics, textiles, and, in later contexts, electronic art, film, and photography.  Please send a 250-word abstract, bio or CV (one page only), and audio-visual requests to Ben P. Robertson, Troy University, bprobertson@troy.edu, by 15 May 2015.

 

Langston Hughes Society

The Works of Langston Hughes: Literature and the Other Arts

This panel welcomes papers about any aspect of Langston Hughes' work. Paper proposals specifically addressing SAMLA 87's theme of "In Concert: Literature and the Other Arts" are especially welcome. By June 15th, please submit a 150-word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Tara Green, UNC-Greensboro, at ttgreen@uncg.edu

 

The Mark Twain Circle of America 

Mark Twain and the Other Arts

In keeping with the conference theme “In Concert: Literature and the Other Arts”, the Mark Twain Circle invites papers for a panel on any aspect of Twain’s engagement with the arts.  Possible topics may include:

-Twain’s writing about the arts (including literature, music, theatre, and the fine and decorative arts)
-Representations of the arts in Twain’s works (including theater, music, architecture, fashion, sculpture and painting)
-Twain in the arts (representations of Twain in painting and print, cartoons and comics, theater, television and film). 
-Other approaches are welcomed.
Please send a 300 word abstract and brief bio by 15 May 2015 to James Hewitson at jhewitso@utk.edu.  Please also note any A/V needs.

Marxist Literary Group

Marx and the Arts

According to Marx, man’s aesthetic sense is socially acquired, rather than innate. As cultural producers, artists must labor in the system for the benefit of the market as well as be committed to the working-class cause.  In keeping with the theme of SAMLA87, this panel will seek to explore the ways that social constructs can influence all mediums of art. Papers dealing with any aspect of Marxism will be considered as well. Please send abstracts, A/V requirements, and a brief bio to Emma Baughman, Georgia State University, at emmacbaughman@gmail.com. Deadline is 10 June 2015. 

 

MELUS I-A

Voices: Orchestration, Dissonance, and Double Discourses in Multiethnic Literature

The theme of this year’s conference, In Concert: Literature and the Other Arts, reminds us of Bakhtin’s use of musical terms to illustrate the interaction of voices that characterizes the novel as a narrative form.  This MELUS (Society for the Study of Multiethnic Literature in the United States) sponsored panel is seeking papers that explore multivoiced narratives and describe the way multiethnic literature uses polyphony to examine social, ethnic, gender, and cultural intersections. We are particularly interested in papers that study polyphony, dissonance, and doubleness as narrative strategies to portray multiple interactions between selves and others across sociopolitical and cultural traditions. By June 1st, please submit a 300-word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Gema Ortega, Dominican University, at gortega@dom.edu.

 

MELUS I-B

Literatures of the African Diaspora and the Other Arts

Award-winning Nigerian author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie has just been nominated for a Grammy. Yes, a music award. A sample from her Ted Talk “We Should All Be Feminists” is featured in Beyonce’s hit song “Flawless.” Adichie’s nomination, a first for a Nigerian writer, is an exciting demonstration of contemporary intersections of the literature of the African Diaspora and other arts. Adichie first gave her talk to a live audience, it later “went viral” on the video sharing platform Youtube (where Beyonce accessed the work so inspirational to her developing feminist identification), it was initially published via Kindle, and is forthcoming as a paperback.  Adichie’s words, her voice, in a popular Beyonce song create exciting critical and pedagogical possibilities for addressing contemporary relationships between the literatures of the African Diaspora and other arts. MELUS invites papers for its annual panel at SAMLA 87, which will be held November 12-15, 2015.  In keeping with this year’s conference theme, “In Concert: Literature and the Other Arts,” we welcome 10-15 minute papers analyzing contemporary literary works of the African Diaspora and their relationship with other arts, such as painting, sculpture, photography, book making, music, dance, film, and architecture.  The confluence of Adichie’s and Beyonce’s work serves as a springboard.  These papers may seek to address, but are in no way limited to: the impact of mobility and migration on artistic production, literary representations of artistic production, or pedagogical opportunities for theorizing intersections of literature and other arts. By May 15, 2015, please submit a biography, 300 word abstract (please include working title) and a/v needs to Maia Butler, University of Louisiana at Lafayette at maia@louisiana.edu. All presenters, chairs, and moderators must be members of MELUS.  Membership information can be found on the MELUS website at www.melus.org/members.

 

MELUS I-C

The Legacy of Performance: Oral Storytelling and Music in Minority, Postcolonial, and Immigrant Literatures

People in ethnic/racial minority groups, those from colonized countries, and immigrants often carry with them a rich heritage of oral storytelling and musical performance - from the Ananci stories out of Africa to the Klezmer music of Jewish immigrants. This panel invites papers on literary texts that represent, celebrate, rework, or otherwise engage with the conference theme of creativity in all of its manifestations. Topics might include, but are not limited to: the use of trickster figures in literature, reworking/rewriting of oral myths/legends, the use of music in literature, and the use of visual and/or performing arts in literature. Presentations should run between 15 and 20 minutes and allow time for discussion. Please submit 250-300 word abstracts, a brief biography, contact information, and detailed requests for specific audiovisual equipment to April Conley Kilinski at akilinski@johnsonu.edu by June 10, 2015. Presenters must be members of SAMLA and of MELUS by the time of the convention.

 

Modern Drama

This session invites submissions of paper proposals on plays and/or performances under the broad category of modern drama.  Comparative Drama as well as Drama in English papers are welcome.  By June 12, 2015, please submit a 300-word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Scott Proudfit, Elon University, at sproudfit@elon.edu.

 

The Nathaniel Hawthorne Society at SAMLA

In keeping with this year’s SAMLA theme, “In Concert: Literature and other Arts,” this panel welcomes proposals for papers on any topic related to Hawthorne and the arts or Hawthorne as a literary artist. By June 25, please submit an abstract of up to 300 words, a brief bio, and any A/V requirements to Steven Petersheim, Indiana University East, spetersh@iue.edu

 

Native American Literature Committee

This panel welcomes papers about any aspect of Native American Literature ranging from teaching Native American literature to analysis of specific authors or texts. Papers investigating the SAMLA 87 theme of music or dance are especially welcome. By June 22nd, please send an abstract of up to 300 words, a brief bio, and A/V requirements to Rebecca Stephens at stephensrj@mail.etsu.edu.

 

Robert Penn Warren Circle

Writer at Large: RPW and the Allied Arts

We invite abstracts for papers addressing any aspect of Robert Penn Warren's life or work, but are especially interested in maintaining a focus on this year's conference theme: In Concert: Literature & the Other Arts. For paper proposals, please send paper title and an abstract of 50-100 words, along with writer's name, affiliation, and a brief bio. Please send your materials No later than June 15, 2015 to Victor Strandberg: vhs@duke.edu.

 

Reception Studies Society

This panel welcomes papers about any aspect of reception studies, including pedagogical work.  Paper proposals addressing the SAMLA 87 theme are especially welcome.  The Reception Study Society seeks to promote informal and formal exchanges between scholars in several related fields. Bringing together theorists, scholars, and teachers from many areas, this association promotes a much needed cross-dialogue among all areas of reception studies.  By June 1st, 2015, please email abstracts of 250-350 words, a brief bio, and A/V requirements to Paul Dahlgren, Georgia Southwestern State University, at paul.dahlgren@gsw.edu

 

Samuel Beckett Society

Beckett’s Bodies: Affect, Disability, Performance

This panel seeks to explore the ways in which bodies are figured and disfigured in Beckett’s work. On their own constituting an expansive “body of work,” Beckett’s prose texts, poems, plays, radio, television, and film works posit human, non-human, and inhuman bodies in different and often surprising forms. What kinds of bodies are incorporated, disembodied, or stripped bare in Beckett’s work? How can we trace the life, vulnerability, and survival of the body in single texts and across works? Are Beckettian physical and textual bodies susceptible to or immune from affect? Which bodies, metaphorical or otherwise, are excluded from consideration and care in a prolific archive of Beckett criticism? How does the body function and dysfunction across genre and media, prose and performance? The purpose of this panel is to provide a multidisciplinary platform for thinking about the body in Beckett’s work through emerging reading practices, which could engender new connections and ideas for such an extensively critiqued range of texts. In keeping with SAMLA’s theme for the 2015 conference, “In Concert: Literature and the Other Arts” emphasis placed on thinking across genre, media, and theories is encouraged, and will be a significant part of our conversation at this panel. Possible approaches and topics include, but are not limited to:

Queer bodies in Beckett’s work
Beckett and disability studies
Bodily capacity and its limits in performance
Affect and its embodiments in Beckett’s work
Gendered bodies and feminist approaches to Beckett
Beckett’s body of work and its sustained life in/through/as Beckett criticism
Ill-sensing: perception and the phenomenological body
Food studies, consuming bodies, oral fixations, sucking stones
Adaptations of Beckett and the political, gendered, and racialized body
Stage directions, choreography, and demands on the performing body
Please send a 250-300 word abstract and a brief bio to: michelle_rada@brown.edu by June 1, 2015.

 

Samuel Beckett Society

Samuel Beckett Among the Other Arts

Since his first novels, like Watt, where an abstract painting has a prominent role, up to his last works, written directly for television, Beckett’s oeuvre created spaces that opened beyond the purely literary unto the plastic and musical. At the same time, artists have always been attracted to his work, from his friends Avigdor Arikha, Bram and Geer Van Velde, up to Damien Hirst and other contemporaries. Is Beckett’s art intrinsically multidisciplinary? Is there something about its questions and form that cannot appear only as text, but that always calls forth the image, the visual or the musical? This panel welcomes proposals that address any aspect, work or works of Beckett in relation to other arts or artists. Please submit by June 13th a 300-word abstract, brief bio and A/V requirements to James Martell, Lyon College, at professeurmartell@hotmail.com.

 

Society for the History of Authorship, Reading, and Publishing (SHARP)

Print Culture and the Arts

Papers are invited for the Society for the History of Authorship, Reading, and Publishing (SHARP) affiliate session at the 2015 SAMLA Convention. Potential topics include print culture, history of the book, authorship, publishing history, ephemera, illustration, publishers' archives, circulation, and reception. Papers addressing this year's theme, "In Concert: Literature and the Other Arts" are especially welcome. What connections can be made between print culture/book history and the areas of visual art, theatre, and music? How has the relationship between print culture and the arts evolved from the manuscript age to the digital world of the 21st century? Proposers need not be members of SHARP to submit, but panelists must be members of both SAMLA and SHARP in order to present. By June 1, 2015, please email a 350-word abstract and short biography (including contact information) to SHARP liaison Dr. Melissa Makala, at me.makala@gmail.com.

 

Society for the Study of Southern Literature (SSSL)

Spanish Moss and Alligators: Southern Swamps in the Literary and Popular Imaginary

This panel invites papers that investigate literary or popular representations of Southern swamps from any era. All approaches and topics are welcome but potential ones might include ecocritical, posthumanist, animal studies, Indigenous studies, slave narratives, nature writing, ‘cli fi,’ documentaries, and popular culture renderings. Please submit a 300-word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Kirstin Squint at ksquint@highpoint.edu by May 15, 2015.

 

Southeastern Medieval Association (SEMA)

Of Marriages and Disciplines: Celebrating the Fruits of Interdisciplinary Nature of Medieval Studies

This session seeks presentations that explore the many riches of interdisciplinary studies of the medieval period.  Many of us in the field take this for granted, but we should not.  Rather we should take a moment to celebrate the way that art and history and philosophy and literature all work to illuminate and contradict each other.  By June 15, 2015, please submit a 500 word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Michael Crafton,mcrafton@westga.edu.

 

T.S. Eliot Society

T.S. Eliot and the Arts

This panel welcomes papers concerned with the life and works of T. S. Eliot. Paper proposals addressing Eliot's many-sided engagement with the extraliterary arts, the SAMLA 87 theme, are especially welcome. By June 1, please submit a 250-word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to John Morgenstern, Clemson University, at jmorgen@clemson.edu.

 

Truman Capote Society

Studies of the Works and Life of Truman Capote

Papers on any topic related to the title of this session will be considered. By June 25th, 2015, please send submissions of no longer than two or three pages, as well as contact information, to Stuart Noel, Georgia Perimeter College, 3251 Panthersville Road, Decatur, GA 30034 or by email to stuart.noel@gpc.edu.

 

Walker Percy Society

The Walker Percy Society invites paper proposals for session at the South Atlantic Modern Language Association, 2015.  Proposals should address the following topics:
I. Walker Percy: comparativist analysis to other writers and traditions.
II. Walker Percy’s social theory as set forth in his essays, book reviews and novels.
III. Walker Percy as literary critic and book reviewer.
Papers should be 20 minutes in length. Papers must be read in person by the author.
Proposals should be submitted to:

Dr. Benjamin B. Alexander (balexander@franciscan.edu)
Acting Chairman, Percy Society
Professor of English and Humanities
Franciscan University of Steubenville

Steubenville, Ohio 43952

 

The William Faulkner Society

Multimedia Faulkner

During his varied and prolific career, William Faulkner worked across diverse media. For SAMLA 87, this panel, co-sponsored by The Faulkner Society, seeks papers that address the multimedia influences of Faulkner in print, on film, and beyond. This panel invites new perspectives on William Faulkner, his work, and his influences from and on other media. Topics may include but are not limited to Faulkner and/on film; Faulkner and mass media; folk art and culture in Faulkner’s work; musical and epic influences in and on Faulkner; and the continuing influences of Faulkner on high and low cultures around the world. By June 5, 2015, please email abstracts of 250-350 words and A/V requirements to Harper Strom, Georgia State University, at hstrom@gsu.edu, and Ulf Kirchdorfer, Darton State College, at ulf.kirchdorfer@darton.edu. 

 

Women in French

Drawing Outside the Lines: Francophone Women Writers and the Visual or Performing Arts

The goal of this panel is to explore the intertextual or transgeneric conversations present in the work of women whose artistic production encompasses multiple media: specifically, writers who are also recognized for their painting, sculpture, theater or film. How do we understand the relationship between works in different media? To what extent does the artist reflect on the practice of shifting between media or traditions in their work? This panel is intended to bring together papers on artists from different regions and working in diverse media. This could include writers from Québec and the Caribbean (such as Blais, Proulx, Hébert, Condé or Agnant), Africa and the Maghreb (notably Véronique Tadjo, Werewere Liking, or Assia Djebar), or Europe (Sand, Duras, Cixous, and NDiaye, par ex). Please address any questions to Amy Reid, reid@ncf.edu. Papers may be in French or in English. Abstracts of 250-300 words are due by May 15.

 

 

Regular Sessions

 

20th-Century Authors and Their Other Art

This panel welcomes papers on any aspect of 20th century authors’ work outside of writing.  By June 1, 2015, please submit a 200 word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Jules Hojnowski, jah11@cornell.edu.

 

African American Literature

Blues, Jazz, and the African American Literary Canon

Houston Baker Jr. describes the American blues as the Derridean “always already” of African American culture. In Blues, Ideology, and Afro-American Literature, Baker states,
“They [blues] are the multiplex enabling script in which Afro-American cultural discourse is inscribed.” The blues document the violent history and traumas endured while affirming the “somebodiness of black people” (James Cone). Likewise, African American Literature often operates within the blues matrix even as it too inscribes a cultural discourse that affirms the “somebodiness of black people.” This panel is interested in identifying moments in African American Literature where blues aesthetics or blues themes enable a lasting (and growing) cultural discourse that confronts haunting traumas. In other words, how do the blues and African American Literature combine to form a space for meditation? Other interests may be related to (but not limited to) an investigation of the similarities between the literary artists and the blues/jazz artist: What cultural responsibilities (if any) may these artists share? How do literary artists signify to and build on black music traditions? What cultural criticisms are found within these moments of signifying? How do African American literary traditions and black music traditions form a body of knowledge that reconfigures an astute interpretation of black identity? Presentation abstracts (300 words) should be sent to Dr. Ren Denton at gdenton@ega.edu by June 7, 2015.

 

American Literature (Pre-1900), Session A

Beyond the Word: Textual Images and Imagination in American Literature of the Late 18th through 19th Centuries

This year's theme for SAMLA is "In Concert: Literature and the Other Arts." Possible topics include but are not limited to:
-In writing on the natural environment, how did nature writers incorporate ekphrasis into their texts to bring the reader closer to the nature?
-What influence did America's visual artists (such as Audubon and Thomas Cole) have on American literature throughout the 19th century?
-In what ways did Americans writers of the late 18th through the 19th centuries  incorporate illustrations and other art work into their texts and books as physical objects (e.g., book covers), whether as marketing ploys or ways to enhance the reader's experience of the text?
Conference will be November 13-15 in Durham, North Carolina.
By June 1, please email a 250-300 word abstract along with a current CV and audio/visual requirements to Benjamin Crawford at bcrawford@crimson.ua.edu

 

American Lyricists

The American Lyricists panel encourages submissions that address the literary nature of works by singer/songwriters. While panel participants have traditionally offered presentations about country music and Americana writers, submissions regarding songwriters in other traditions are also welcome. Authors should remember that this session emphasizes the work of the lyricists and not the performers of discussed pieces. Submissions addressing the conference theme of "In Concert: Literature and the Other Arts" will receive special consideration, but all topics are welcome. By June 15, 2015, please submit a 300 word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Thomas Alan Holmes, holmest@mail.etsu.edu.

 

Appalachian Literature

Appalachia and the Arts

As a region long portrayed by writers and artists, what is the relationship between Appalachia and the arts? In what ways has Appalachia been exploited or limited by "artists"? In what ways has Appalachia been solidified and celebrated by "artists"? This panel hopes to explore the relationship of art and regional identity, encouraging a wide range of topics and approaches.  Ultimately, let us ask what is Appalachia, its literature, and its art? What can art and literature do to and for Appalachia?

Papers may explore:
-role of traditional art and culture in Appalachian Literature
-the expansion of art and culture within Appalachia
-Appalachian Literature as a means of shifting Appalachian Identity
-Appalachian Art as a means of shifting Appalachian Identity
-intersections of literature and other arts within Appalachia or Appalachian Literature
-images of the artist in Appalachian Literature
-uses of Appalachia in the arts (music, theater, visual, etc.)
This panel welcomes papers about any aspect of Appalachian Literature, with a special interest in papers about art. By June 1, please submit a 300 word abstract, brief bio and A/V requirements to Meredith McCarroll, Clemson University, mmccarr@clemson.edu.

 

Children’s and Youth Culture on the Screen

Nine of the ten highest-grossing Hollywood movies of 2014 were based on creative properties from children’s and youth culture, including comic books, novels, and toys. In line with this year’s theme of In Concert: Literature and the Other Arts, I welcome papers that examine adaptation, compare media (broadly defined), and/or explore transmedia storytelling. While papers on recent adaptations are particularly encouraged, this panel seeks a variety of new, productive perspectives on adapting children’s and youth culture for various media, including film, television, and online media. Moving beyond familiar discussions of fidelity, prospective papers might consider genre, representation, intertextuality, aesthetics, reception, authorship, and production studies. I also welcome papers that consider something other than book-to-film, like toy-to-film (G.I. Joe or The Lego Movie) or theme park attraction-to-film (Pirates of the Caribbean, Tomorrowland), etc. If I have a robust enough response, we might also discuss a special journal issue or edited collection in the future. Please submit 250-word proposals to Pete Kunze (pkunze@utexas.edu) by May 15, 2015. Inquiries welcome!

 

Children's Literature

Children's Literature and (Trans/Inter)medial Texts

In working with the SAMLA 87 theme Literature and the Other Arts, this Children's Literature panel welcomes papers that explore children's literature through a transmedial or intermedial focus. Using Werner Wolf's (2005) definitions of these terms, papers submitted might focus on the following: 

- narrative phenomena not specific to an individual medium but that appear across a variety of different media (e.g. motifs, themes, style, etc.)
- texts that utilize two or more media or modes (e.g. digital hybrid texts, picture books, comics, etc.)
- texts that incorporate another medium thematically (e.g. a book with a music or art theme)
- any adaptation where a text was taken from one medium and transformed into another (e.g. book to movie, movie to book, video game to book, book to play, etc.)
While papers are requested focusing on the above description, proposals discussing any aspect of children’s literature or media will be considered. By June 15, please submit a 250-500 word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Karly Marie Grice, The Ohio State University, at grice.17@osu.edu

 

Comparative Literature

This panel welcomes papers that are interdisciplinary in nature and scope, or that otherwise involve the comparative study of literatures across languages, genres, time periods, and national boundaries. Paper proposals addressing the SAMLA 87 theme, In Concert: Literature and the Other Arts, are especially welcome. Please submit a 300-word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Jaime Cruz-Ortiz (Kennesaw State University) at jcruzort@kennesaw.edu.

 

Comparative Literature

Textual Liberation: Feminist Writing at the Fin-de-Siècle

Feminism altered the course of literature by challenging those literary conventions that governed the portrayal of women and women's experience at the fin de siècle. Feminist texts explicitly advocated social change and discussed new women’s roles in society. This panel welcomes papers about any aspect of nineteenth-century feminism. Comparative approaches are welcome. By June 25th, 2015, please submit a 250-300 word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Elena Shabliy, eshabliy@tulane.edu.

 

Composition and Rhetoric

Composing Literary Composition

Although literature and composition/rhetoric depend on each other in interlocking, sometimes iterative ways, they are very often considered and taught completely separately, sometimes even housed in different departments. In this panel, we endeavor to bring them closer together, examining the ways in which their concerns and methods overlap, whether easily or fitfully.

Proposed papers can consider questions including but not limited to:
What is intriguing or useful about the histories of comp-rhet and literature that's instructive for teaching one or both of them today?

How does the teaching of literature interact with the teaching of composition?
How can we unite different aspects of literary studies and composition studies to educate students in a different way?
What practical applications do technological or other approaches, including interdisciplinary ones, have for bridging this divide?

Alternatively, what are some fresh arguments for keeping them separate?    
Please submit a 300-word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements by June 15, 2015 to Hilarie Ashton, CUNY Graduate Center at hashton@gradcenter.cuny.edu.

 

Critical Thinking in the Rhetoric/Composition Classroom

Orchestrating Agency: In What Ways Is Our Pedagogy Evolving?

Our evolving theoretical understanding of individual rhetorical agency as embodied processes has led to an emphasis on the transfer of rhetorical knowledge to new contexts.  In what ways does our pedagogy make students aware of rhetorical agency as an embodied process that can be transferred to other contexts?  How can our pedagogies reach Marilyn Cooper’s (CCC, 62.3, 2011) definition of rhetorical agency as “emergent and enacted,” an “ongoing process in which a multitude of agents interact frequently and in which the results of interactions feed back into the process”?  We invite you to submit proposals focused on pedagogies designed to foster the embodiment of rhetorical agency, to direct emergent rhetorical agency to locations of new contexts and interaction, and to guide the restructuring of responses gained from feedback received from other agents. Please submit a 300-word proposal, brief bio, and AV request to the session chair, Kathleen Bell (Kathleen.Bell@ucf.edu), University of Central Florida, by Monday, June 1, 2015.

 

Darwinian Literary Theory

Answering E.O. Wilson's call for "consilience" in the interpretation of literature (i.e., readings of texts that are consistent with, and help to further demonstrate, the regularities of human nature demonstrated by evolutionary science), Darwinian Literary Theory now provides exciting opportunities to probe what Joseph Carroll, the leading scholar in the field, has termed "the deep structure of literary representations." This session invites proposals for papers that consider literature as an extension of the evolved and adapted mind and view literary works, authors, or periods through the lens of contemporary evolutionary theory. Proposals that reflect a sound understanding of the way that specific insights from evolutionary psychology may be used to illuminate literary texts are especially welcome. Please address abstracts to cduncan@cau.edu, with cc. to rfunk2@hccfl.edu. Deadline for submissions is June 15, 2015.

 

Early Modern Catholic Studies

This panel welcomes papers about any aspect of Early Modern Catholic Studies including the influence of Dante, Shakespeare, and Chaucer on modernist writers or modernist elements in these writers.  Paper proposals addressing the SAMLA theme are especially welcome.  Please submit 300 word abstract, brief bio and A/V requirements to Benjamin Alexander, Franciscan University at bbaben@aol.com.

 

English I (Medieval)

The Arts in Early Medieval Literature

In keeping with this year’s conference theme (“In Concert: Literature and the Other Arts”) the Medieval session this year is open for papers that deal with any of the arts of the period, from the illustration of illuminated manuscripts, wearable art such as heraldric jewelry, and other artifacts and implements. Papers that explore the descriptions of material culture in works such as Sir Gawain and the Green Knight with its lush description of the trappings of the Knight himself, would also be welcome. Celebrations of music or depictions of the holiday customs of singing and dancing, ekphrasis, the employment of inanimate objects in riddles, giving voice to inanimate objects as in The Dream of the Rood, the possible topics are limitless. This year’s conference will be in Durham, North Carolina on November 13-15, 2015. Please send a 250-word abstract, a one-page bio, and A/V requirements to Rachel Scoggins, vscoggins2@student.gsu.edu by June 15.

 

English II (1500 to 1600), Session A

More Matter with Less Art? Literature and the Other Arts in 16th-Century England

This panel invites papers concerning the intersections of literature and the other arts in the sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries. Suggested topics include but are not limited to: the influence of the Reformation on artistic production, the use of music in the public theater, representations of courtly masques and dancing, the musicality of poetry, representations of architecture in literature, etc. By June 15, 2015, please submit a 300-word abstract and brief bio to Donna Wroble, Georgia State University, at dwroble1@student.gsu.edu

 

English II (1500 to 1600), Session C

Early Modern Inversions

Conference papers are invited to explore the literary, cultural, and theoretical aspects of inversions in early modern drama, poetry, and prose. This session will explore the nature and meaning of inversions (broadly defined), with special attention paid to how unexpected (or previously unseen) inversions display, develop, or subvert traditional ideas of community and order. This session encourages papers that examine gender, politics, economics, science, and religion. Please send 200-word abstracts and short bios by 1 June, 2015 to Matt Carter, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, at mccarte2@uncg.edu.

 

English III (The Restoration and 18th Century)

Great Collaborations in the Long 18th Century

This panel welcomes papers about any aspect of Restoration and 18th Century British Literature.  Paper proposals addressing the SAMLA 87 theme, Literature and the Other Arts, are especially welcome.  In particular the panel seeks papers on successful (maybe surprising) collaborations by writers working in similar genres.  Papers on Joseph Addison and Richard Steele are welcome.  But the panel also seeks to explore less famous collaborators. Aphra Behn and George Etherege, Eliza Haywood, and Henry Fielding, Frances Burney and Samuel Johnson are only a few of many possibilities. By 1 June 2015, please submit a 250 word abstract, brief bio, and AV requirements to Brian McCrea, Flagler Collge, at brmccrea@ufl.edu.  

 

Fairy Tale Sensibilities and Their Sustainability

It is a given that fairy tales are more than stories just for children. Their messages transcend age, culture, and generation. Broad classification of fairy tales and their elements, first by Antti Aarne and refined by Stith Thompson in the early twentieth century helps to point out these commonalities. While common elements help us to connect to the stories, we are impacted just as strongly by tales told through various art forms. From the opera to classical music to ballet, from painting to sculpture, to film and photography, the written words that create the fairy tales are brought to life through incorporating other senses of sight, hearing, and touch. An excellent example is the iconic bronze statue of the Little Mermaid in Copenhagen. Forever gazing longingly out at the ocean of which she is no longer a part, the statue offers a visual representation of the longing and loss told in the story, connecting the viewer at a deeper level. Representations of fairy tales in different art forms deepen and broaden our understanding of the lessons taught by the tales themselves. This panel seeks to discuss the connections between fairy tales and art in all forms, not just written work. Does art change our perception of the fairy tale? Does it enhance the lesson we learn, or does it dictate a single, specific outcome in our understanding? All submissions addressing the continuing impact of fairy tales are welcome, and those relating art and fairy tales are encouraged.  By June 12, 2015, please submit a 250-word abstract and AV requirements to Kathy Whitaker, whitaker@ega.edu.

 

Folklore

Southern Folklore and the Arts

This panel welcomes papers about any aspect of folklore--especially about the SAMLA 2015 theme of southern folklore and the arts.  The panel will explore folklore expressions of art--music, song, story, material culture (pottery, quilts, textiles), beliefs, or more.  HUCKLEBERRY FINN is considered the first great American novel, for Mark Twain provides American style as well as content.  Likewise, folklore provided our first Southern literature by giving voice to Southern style as well as content.  How does the artistry of traditional Southern folklore contribute to the voices, beliefs, fears, identity, and/or community building of ordinary folks?  What is the relationship between the singer and the song? Or the art and the performer or crafter? In what ways does folklore contribute to Southern art and/or identity?  This panel will explore a wide range of topics and approaches.  By June 1, please submit a 250 word abstract, brief bio, and AV requirements to Cece Conway (Appalachian State U & 2015 Alan Lomax Fellow at the Kluge Center of the Library of Congress): conwayec@email.unc.edu

 

Food in Fiction

This panel welcomes papers about any aspect of representations of food in fiction. By June 15, 2015, please submit a 350 word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Heather Richie, heather@heatherrichie.com.

 

French II (17th and 18th Centuries)

L’image et l’imaginaire

Vous êtes cordialement invités à adresser les propositions de communication qui explorent ce thème (300 mots maximum) en français ou anglais, avec une brève biographie et vos besoins audiovisuels à  Laura Nelson, Middle Tennessee State University, Laura.Nelson@mtsu.edu.  La date limite de dèpôt des propositions est le 2 juin 2015.

 

French III (19th and 20th Centuries)

Literature and the Arts

This panel welcomes any papers on any aspect of 19th-21st century French or Francophone literature and culture. Paper proposals related to this year’s conference theme, “In Concert: Literature and the Other Arts” will be given special consideration. Papers may be given either in French or in English and may not exceed 20 minutes. Please send an abstract of no more than 500 words, a brief bio, and any audio-visual needs to Rachel Paparone, Wake Forest University, rachelpaparone@gmail.com. Deadline June 1, 2015.

 

Gay and Lesbian Studies, Session I

Sappho’s lyre; Wilde’s meticulous description of Dorian Gray’s interior décor; Wojnarowicz’s paintings, photographs, and films; and Anzaldúa’s collection of altar objects all testify to an enduring connection between the queer writer and other forms of art.  Indeed, scholars such as Laurel Brake and Matt Cook have traced how fin-de-siècle publications like the London monthly The Artist encoded homosexual concerns into its otherwise mainstream record of “arts, crafts, and industries” in the 1880s and 90s, and recent books like Christopher Reed’s Art and Homosexuality seek to explore “the radical, long-standing interdependence between art and homosexuality.”  Following these leads, this panel invites papers that examine queer authors or literary concerns in concert with “the Other Arts.” By 1 June 2015, please send an abstract of no more than 500 words, a brief bio, and any audio-visual requirements to Benjamin Hudson, University of Georgia, at arebours@uga.edu.

 

Gay and Lesbian Studies, Session II

This panel welcomes papers about any aspect of Gay and Lesbian Studies. By 1 June 2015, please submit an abstract of no more than 500 words, a brief bio, and any audio-visual requirements to Benjamin Hudson, University of Georgia, at arebours@uga.edu.

 

General Admission Only: Strategies in Literature and the Other Arts for Edu(taining) the Two-Year College English Student

Freshmen Composition Students in Two-Year Colleges are, without doubt, the most general of audiences, and, it appears, the least “energized” by literature of any age, genre, or nationality.  Indeed, in the Wikipedian Age, two-year college literature survey courses are becoming just unpopular electives; no longer required, no longer relevant to students or administrators, no longer finding an audience of any kind.  It appears that literature is just “other”; not “in concert” with either composition/rhetoric instruction or the other arts.  How are two-year college English instructors dealing with the state of literature studies, and how can incorporating “literature and the other arts” help? By June 15, 2015, please submit a 1 page abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Reginald Abbott, emory.abbott@gpc.edu.

 

German III (1933-Present)

The Kafkaesque in German Literature and Film

The work of Franz Kafka has long fascinated authors, filmmakers, scholars and lay readers alike. Kafka is so present in the contemporary context that there is even an adjective in active use to describe phenomena that resemble the complicated, bizarre, or illogical circumstances under which his characters find themselves. This panel invites submissions of papers addressing the longevity of Kafka’s work and the Kafkaesque in the German-language context in literature and film after 1933. Questions to consider include but are not limited to: What exactly is the Kafkaesque (a mood, a circumstance, a feeling) and why is the Kafkaesque so relevant to 20th Century and even contemporary thought and culture?  What kinds of work do allusions to Kafka perform for different authors and filmmakers? Why is Kafka invoked so frequently by authors and filmmakers of such varied backgrounds? Does the idea of the Kafkaesque remain constant or does it undergo a metamorphosis of its own over time? By May 19th 2015, please submit a 300 word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Claire E. Scott, Carolina-Duke Graduate Program in German Studies, at claire.scott@duke.edu.

 

Graduate Students’ Forum in English

Picturing Childhood in American Literature and Culture

In her recent book about the role of childhood studies in the humanities, Anna Mae Duane writes, “The study of children, often seen as peripheral to the important work of understanding social, political, national, and ethnic structures, allows us to rethink the very foundations underlying these structures.” This panel will explore how children play central roles in “social, political, national, and ethnic structures” and consider the ways in which literary representations of childhood participate in this process. When we study child characters and fictional depictions of childhood, what new insights are revealed about social and cultural institutions? How have those roles shifted over time throughout American literature and culture? What does examining childhood tell us about gender, race, class, sexuality, and religion? Proposals should consider the role of young people in American literature and culture, including literature produced for adults, teenagers, or children. Papers that connect to this year’s focus on literature and the arts are especially welcome, and topics might include but are not limited to film adaptations of children’s/young adult books, picture books, graphic novels, child artists in literature, and the arts and children’s education. Please send abstracts (250-300 words) to Laura Hakala at Laura.hakala@eagles.usm.edu by May 15, 2015.

 

Graduate Studies in Spanish Discussion Circle

This panel welcomes papers about any aspect of graduate studies in Spanish. By June 16, 2015, please submit a 300 word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Ruth Sanchez Imicoz, rsanchez@sewanee.edu.

 

Holocaust in Literature and Film

Holocaust in Literature and Film: This panel invites papers on representations of the Holocaust in 21st century-texts or films. Paper proposals addressing the SAMLA 87 theme are especially welcome. By June 15, please submit an abstract of approximately 250 words, a brief bio, and A/V requirements to Bärbel Such, Ohio University, such@ohio.edu.

 

International Detective Fiction

Voices from Contemporary Africa and Asia

This panel seeks proposals concerning detective fiction (amateur, professional, or police) set in contemporary Africa and Asia. For example, authors might include: Malla Nunn (South Africa), Michael Stanley (Botswana), Kwei Quartey (Ghana), Yasmina Khadra (Algiers), Colin Cotterill (Laos and Thailand), Eliot Pattison (Tibet), or Tarquin Hall (India). All theoretical and critical approaches are welcome. By June 15, please submit a 250-word abstract and A/V requirements to Patricia Worrall, University of North Georgia, at patricia.worrall@ung.edu.

 

Italian I (Medieval and Renaissance Literature)

This panel welcomes papers about any aspect of Medieval and Renaissance Italian Literature. Paper proposals addressing the SAMLA 87 theme are especially welcome. By June 15, please submit a 300-word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Melinda Cro, Kansas State University, at macro@ksu.edu.

 

Italian II (1600-Present)

This panel welcomes scholarly contributions on any aspect of modern and contemporary Italian literature. Of particular interest are papers addressing the SAMLA 87 theme, “In Concert: Literature and the Other Arts.” By June 5, 2015, please submit a 250-word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Giovanna Summerfield, Auburn University, at summegi@auburn.edu

  

James Baldwin and Performance of Race, Identity, and Gender in the Arts

James Baldwin, one of the most eminent and evocative American essayists, novelists and playwrights of the twentieth century, would have been ninety-one years old on August 2, 2015. Literary critics have described Baldwin as the most successful African American writer of his time, and even of all time.  His prominence or fame are of less importance, though, than the substantial body of complex writing he left behind for readers, students, and scholars to interpret. This panel seeks submissions that examine some of the social and political race-related controversies of our time and the future in the context of James Baldwin's assertion that “There is something terribly radical about believing that one's own experience and images are important enough to speak about, much less to write about and to perform.”
,Since the theme for this year’s conference is “In Concert: Literature and the Other Arts,” papers should focus on the relationship between the performance of race, identity, and gender in the scholarship of James Baldwin. Critiques and analyses of Baldwin’s The Fire Next Time are of particular interest, but research or works in progress that explores Baldwin’s creative approach to making art out of words will be welcomed. Possible topics include, but are not limited to: Baldwin’s engagement with religion and his efforts to imagine black liberation and human freedom; Baldwin’s investment and connection to the theater; Baldwin and his effort to eliminate racism and challenge us to align concepts of education and justice in ways that call for conscience, critique, and change; Baldwin and his struggle to love and be loved amid the complexities of racism, sexism, and homophobia.  By June 15, 2015, please submit a 300 word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Anton Smith, alsmith47@ua.edu.

 

Linguistics

Approaches to the History of English Language

This panel welcomes papers about any aspect of the history of the English language. Interdisciplinary proposals are especially welcome. By Friday, May 15, 2015, please submit a 300-word abstract, brief biography, and description of audio/visual equipment requirements to Kevin Psonak, Georgia Southern University, at KPsonak@GeorgiaSouthern.edu.

 

Literary Criticism Discussion Circle

Even Newer Directions for Black Feminist Criticism

This panel welcomes papers that discuss or apply Black Feminist Criticism to literature, film, and popular culture in the last thirty years. More specifically, this session will ponder and celebrate how Black Feminist Criticism has evolved since the publication of Deborah McDowell's pivotal essay, "New Directions for Black Feminist Criticism" in 1980. What does Black Feminist Criticism look like in a 21st century context? Are scholars pushing beyond the boundaries that Smith and McDowell set up in their initial calls for a Black Feminist Criticism? By May 15, 2015, please submit a 250-500 word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Dr. Kameelah Martin, Savannah State University at martink@savannahstate.edu.

 

Luso-Brazilian Studies

Luso-Afro-Brazilian Studies

The Luso-Afro-Brazilian table of SAMLA 2015 is seeking papers for presentation at the annual conference. Topics are open, and papers that reflect the conference theme in the Lusophone world will be given special consideration. Multiple sessions are possible and will be determined by the number of submissions. By June 1, 2015, please submit abstracts of no more than 250 words, a brief biography, and A/V requirements to Cecília Rodrigues, University of Georgia, at ceciliar@uga.edu.

 

Medical Arts on Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century Germany

As the art of medicine developed in Germany over the course of the long nineteenth century, physicians and psychologists were actively involved in understanding how literature and art affected their patients, as well as how these same works might be representative of physical and psychological disorders. Rather than understanding how literature was influenced by medicine, this panel is primarily focused on how medical practice borrowed from other artistic and literary genres. Topics might include the case study and its development as a literary genre; the influence art and literature on medicine; explicit works of literature used as evidence by physicians and psychologists; medical portraits and theater. Please submit abstracts of 250-350 words along with AV requests and a brief biographical sketch to Elizabeth Schreiber-Byers, Duke University, eas48@duke.edu.

 

Medieval Literature

Strangers, Neighbors, and Monsters in Medieval Literature

This panel seeks papers that treat any aspect of social difference as presented in the literatures of the Middle Ages. Papers might construe this social difference as confessional, geographic, economic, political, or bodily. How do these categories of difference shape social formation? How do they delimit the boundaries of moral relevance and/or social inclusion? What counts as a neighbor? What counts as a monster? What obligations or affinities do these designations entail? How does one know how to treat a stranger? Paper proposals that deal with the troubling of categories of social difference are especially welcome. So too are proposals that respond to the conference theme of “In Concert: Literature and the Other Arts” by engaging music, architecture, manuscript illumination, painting, sculpture, fashion, or any of the “other arts.” By June 1, 2015, please submit a 300-word abstract, a brief bio, and A/V requirements to Gabriel Ford at gaford@davidson.edu.

 

New Narratives of 9/11: Conspiracy, Terror, and Change

The terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, assumed significance for Arabs and Muslims not solely on account of the sheer magnitude of the disaster, that is the extent of the destruction and the number of victims. Rather, Arabs and Muslims have faced repercussions of the attacks in their own, extended communities, for instance discrimination and racial profiling in the U.S. and war and civil strife in Iraq. This panel seeks to illuminate how Arabs and Muslims have been represented in literature and other arts after the events of 9/11 - and how they have represented themselves. How is terrorism, how are conflicts in the Middle East addressed? What is the place of Islam in the texts? Papers on American and non-American works are welcome. By June 1, 2015, please send abstracts of 300 words or less and a brief bio to Levin Arnsperger, Emory University, at larnspe@emory.edu.

 

Old English

Old English Literature and Science

This panel welcomes proposals on any aspect of Old English literature and science.  Although the Old English period antedates the Scientific Revolution, it includes a number of pre-scientific works.  Among these are Bede’s treatises On the Nature of Things and On Times; poems like “The Phoenix,” based in part on the natural histories of eagles and peacocks; and “monstrous” works such as the Aldhelmian Liber Monstrorum, the Old English prose piece The Marvels of the East, and Beowulf.  While these “monstrous” texts are largely fanciful, they may have been inspired by empirical observations of natural elements such as landscape, weather, and animal remains.  In turn, Old English texts have been profitably studied from a range of scientific perspectives, including ecology, animal studies, information theory, geology, geomythology, archaeology, cognitive studies, cosmology, zoology, meteorology, and taxonomy, among others.  Proposals addressing the SAMLA 87 theme (“In Concert: Literature and the Other Arts”) are also welcome.  By May 15, 2015, please submit a 300-word abstract, a brief bio, and A/V requirements to Timothy J. Burbery, Marshall University, at burbery@marshall.edu.

 

Open Mic Creative Readings

This year, SAMLA will offer a true open mic event for creative writers. Before the event, there will be a sign-up sheet available for readers. We will have only a ninety-minute period for the event. No reader may go over four minutes, including time spent in introducing pieces. Readers not present when their names are called will be dropped. While prose writers are invited to participate, they must offer reading selections of no more than four minutes, just like the poetry readers. We will be strict time keepers to permit as many readers as possible to participate. This event has an enthusiastic following, so join us for a good time. Sign-ups for participation will take place at the conference.

 

Pop Culture and Film 

It seems as though there is a growing trend of adapting works of literature into both film and television productions. This panel seeks research specifically related to representations of literature within pop culture within film and television mediums. We posit several questions in regards to this phenomenon.  Although we welcome any research related to the topic of pop culture and film, we would like to consider papers that entertain the following questions: in what ways does literature lend itself to continual adaptation and implementation within the realm of film and television? What trends are developing as a result of the intersecting of film/television and literature? Is there a direct correlation between pop culture and literacy through the adaptation of literature to film/television medium? Please submit a 250-300 word abstract, a brief bio, and any A/V needs by June 1, 2015 to Ashley Dycus of University of West Georgia at adycus@westga.edu.

 

SAMLA Creative Non-Fiction Writers

The SAMLA creative nonfiction panel is seeking an array of submissions. An interpretation of the conference theme is encouraged but not required. We welcome papers that reflect a deeper understanding on what In Concert: Literature and the Other Arts means as well as personal narratives that lure the reader into the story.  Interdisciplinary work is also encouraged.  CNF submissions should be 5-6 pages maximum using standard MLA format. Panelists will have 15-20 minutes for their presentations. By June 1, 2015, please email narratives, lyric essays, memoirs, travel essays, creative flash nonfiction, genre-bending, hybrid or multimedia papers as DOC attachments to Christine Ristaino, Emory University, at cristai@emory.edu.

 

SAMLA Fiction Writers

Literature and the Other Arts

This panel is seeking engaging fiction that is informed by the arts in its various forms (music, dance, theatre, culinary arts, visual arts, photography, film, etc). The writer is encouraged to interpret this theme broadly. The final panel will consist of fiction writers reading original stories, novel excerpts, hybrid, genre-breaking, or multi-media fiction. By April 15, 2015, please send fiction submissions of no more than 2,500 words, a professional CV, and A/V requirements to Shawn Rubenfeld, Nassau Community College, at shawnrubenfeld@gmail.com.

 

SAMLA Poets on Ekphrasis

The SAMLA Poets panel welcomes creative work. Poets are invited to send work related to this year’s theme, “In Concert: Literature and the Other Arts.” For this year’s Poet’s Panel, we will focus on ekphrastic poetry, in keeping with the theme. Please send your best poems about other arts. Consider your Grecian urns, your last duchesses, your torsos of Apollo. Poets should send a brief publication and professional CV along with his/her writing sample for consideration as a participant for “SAMLA Poets on Ekphrasis.” This sample should include no more than 10 pages/ seven poems. The panel will consist chiefly of poets reading or presenting original, new work with time for a brief question and answer period. By May 31, 2015, please send submissions with SAMLA Poets” in the subject line to Dr. Emily Schulten at schulten@basilicaschool.com.

 

Scandinavian Literature

This panel welcomes papers about any aspect of Scandinavian literature. By May 15, 2015, please submit a 150 word abstract, short bio, and A/V requirements to Tom Conner, tom.conner@snc.edu.

 

Slavic Literature

Papers are welcome on any Slavic language, literature or culture, including film and comparative literature topics. By June 1, 2015, please send submissions to Karen Rosneck, University of Wisconsin-Madison, at Karen.Rosneck@wisc.edu.

 

Spanish I (Peninsular: Renaissance to 1700)

In Concert: Literature and the Other Arts in Spanish Literature

This panel welcomes papers about any aspect of Spanish peninsular literature (Renaissance to 1700). Paper proposals addressing the SAMLA 87 theme are especially welcome. By May 30, 2015 please submit a 250-300 word abstract, brief bio and A/V requirements to Linda Marie Sariego, Neumann University at sariegol@neumann.edu. Paper proposals may be submitted in English or Spanish.

 

Spanish II-A, II-B, II-C (Peninsular: 1700 to Present)

Call for Papers: Spanish II-A, B, and C Peninsular Literature Triple Session: 1700 to Present. Request for abstracts: Abstracts for sessions A and B will reflect any theme related to Peninsular Literature from 1700 to the present. It is hoped that there will be a wide range of topics from different periods. Abstracts for session C should focus on the 2015 conference theme: In Concert: Literature and the Other Arts (1700 to the present). Please bear in mind the following: This is a triple session with a maximum of four participants per session. It also involves SAMLA business, such as elections. Papers should not exceed twenty minutes. Readers should limit their texts to 3,100 words. Potential presenters are urged to get one-page abstracts in as early as possible. (Abstracts sent by e-mail are preferred). Presenters must be members of SAMLA in good standing by August 31, 2015. Presenters may read only one paper at the convention. Papers must be unpublished and not previously presented at a professional meeting.Deadline for abstracts: May 15, 2015. Please send abstracts to: yunsuk.chae@mga.edu.
Address:
Yunsuk Chae, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Spanish
Department of Media, Culture, and the Arts
College of Arts and Sciences
Middle Georgia State College
100 College Station Dr.
Macon, GA 31206

 

Spanish III-B (19th-Century Spanish American Literature)

Aesthetics, Politics, and the Arts in 19th-Century Latin America

Nineteenth Century Latin American culture that examine the non-literary arts and their relationship to politics, aesthetics and ethics. It also invites submissions related to the presence of the non-literary arts within written works that attempt to theorize questions of aesthetics, or which uses these arts as metaphors for larger social questions. Finally, it calls for other investigations into nineteenth-century eclecticism, or the cultural politics of the age (for example, the uses and politics of the review or revista). By June 1st, please submit an abstract of up to 250 words and brief bio to Sergio Gutiérrez Negrón, Emory University, at scgutie@emory.edu.

 

Spanish IV (Contemporary Spanish-American Literature and Popular Culture)

This panel invites papers that focus on any aspect of contemporary Spanish American literature and popular culture. By May 30, please submit a 300-word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to co-chairs Elena Lahr-Vivaz, Rutgers University, Newark (el431@rutgers.edu) and Romano Sánchez-Domínguez, Imperial Valley College (romano.sanchez-domin@imperial.edu). 

 

A Stage of One’s Own: Performance and Rhetoric in Plays by American Women

Virginia Woolf’s A Room of One’s Own offers a complicated and transgressive discussion of what would have happened had Shakespeare had a sister. The canonical playwright’s sister, Judith, would have been limited, at best, in educational and literate opportunities. Writing a comedy or tragedy of her own would certainly have been challenging at best, and publication of that work would likely be out of the question. The nineteenth-century, while moving into more progressive educational structures, sustains those gendered restrictions Woolf emphasizes. American drama produced and published in the 1800s would eventually rely heavily upon sentimentalist traditions, though critical and authorial voices would be persistently male, despite an audience composed largely of women. While scholarship does not typically highlight such, American women did, indeed, compose plays in the nineteenth century. Twentieth-century American drama features far more women playwrights in respective critical and scholarly examination. This panel seeks to interrogate the voices and dramatic productions of such women. “A Stage of One’s Own” will focus exclusively on American women playwrights of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Because of the transgressive nature of a woman’s voice and perspective shaping such a public art as the theatre, particularly in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, this panel asks for papers that focus on the rhetoric of defiance, transgression, or gender roles and/or social norms in dramatic works composed by American women. Particular preference will be given to papers that focus on or consider plays by African American women. Please submit abstracts to Elizabeth G. Allen (egallen@memphis.edu).

 

Teaching Language and Literature: Engagement Through the Arts

In an educational landscape dominated by STEM, how can the arts (visual and/or musical, in particular) be used to engage millenials and prompt critical thinking? This panel welcomes presentations on incorporating the arts into composition or literature courses. Assignments inspired by Grecian urns and weary blues are welcome, as well as those that incorporate contemporary art forms. By June 25th, send a 200-word abstract and brief bio to Deborah.Manson@gpc.edu 

 

Visual Representation of Scholarly Work (Poster Session)

Intersections of Text, Image, and Research

SAMLA welcomes proposals of representations of scholarly work that serve to illuminate a research topic and expand understanding through visual design and the incorporation of visual elements and graphics. The presentation may be multi-media or a poster display. Limited technology will be available for multimedia/multimodal works. While this form of presentation is new in the study of literature, composition/rhetoric, and linguistics, the Program Committee believes this method will create new opportunities for discussions about literature and language and expand our understanding of scholarly research. Presentations that focus on the special topic of the conference, “In Concert: Literature and the Other Arts” are particularly encouraged. By September 21, 2015, please submit a brief description of the project and visual design to Paul Donnelly, Associate Director, SAMLA, at pdonnelly@gsu.edu. 

 

Women’s Studies Panel, Session II

Writing (of) Women’s Bodies: The Contested Nature of Contemporary Corporealities

What is the political significance of embodiment? In this panel, we are looking for a broad array of papers which consider the stakes of embodiment in contemporary culture. What does it mean to have a body that is contested, illegible, unreadable, unexpected? What is at stake in claiming such a body? How are writers addressing such bodies? This panel encourages papers and presentations which consider the portrayal, evocation, and consideration of such bodies in fiction, nonfiction, and cultural artifacts broadly. By June 15, 2015, please submit a 250-300 word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Monica Miller, monica.miller@lmc.gatech.edu.

 

Women Writers of Spain and Latin America

This panel welcomes papers about any aspect of Spanish and/or Latin American women writers. By June 1, 2015, please submit a 300 word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Elizabeth Grassmann, egrassmann@crimson.ua.edu.

 

World Poetry in Translation

The special focus for SAMLA 87 is In Concert: Literature and the Other Arts.  We anticipate having guest poets from Spain, Mexico, Colombia and Central America. Please send presentations that will fit within the framework of this theme.  Presentations that relate poetry to electronic publishing, the visual arts, music and social media will receive special consideration; however, the program will be crafted from the submissions received.  The number of presenters will determine the length of the presentations; they are usually 15-20 minutes. 

 Please send proposals and representative selections to:  Dr. Gordon E. McNeer at gordon.mcneer@ung.edu

 

 

Special Sessions

 

25 Years of Affrilachian Resistance: Black Cultural Production in the Appalachian Region

Next year marks the 25th anniversary of the Affrilachian Poets, a cadre of writers including Frank X Walker, Nikky Finney, Ricardo Nazario Colon, Mitchell L.H. Douglas, Kelly Norman Ellis, Crystal Wilkinson, Crystal Good, and Bianca Spriggs, among many others who continue to shape the literary landscape of the American South. Co-founder, Frank X Walker coined the term “Affrilachia” in an effort to “[challenge] the notion of a homogeneous all-white literary landscape” in Appalachia, and the collective has, indeed, spent two and half decades not only producing work which continues to mount a formidable movement against the myth of an all-white region but also documenting the nuanced realities of an ever expanding global South. This panel welcomes papers that explore the contours and contexts of Affrilachian literature. We especially welcome papers that address the SAMLA 87 theme “In Concert: Literature and the Other Arts.” Other themes that panelists might address in their work include, but are not limited to: cross cultural identities within Affrilachian poetry and fiction; teaching Affrilachian literature above the Mason-Dixon; reclaiming identity; gendered bodies in the poetry of Affrilachia; intersections of race, class, gender, sexuality, etc. in Affrilachian literature; Diasporan intertextual moments in Affrilachian art and culture; Affrilachian voices in Civil Rights and contemporary political movements. By June 15th, please send abstracts (250-300 words) and brief bio to Shauna Morgan Kirlew (shauna.kirlew@howard.edu) or Zanice Bond (zbond@mytu.tuskegee.edu). Participants will be notified of panel acceptance by June 17th.  The 87th Annual SAMLA Conference will be held in Durham, NC, from November 13-15, 2015.

 

“A House is not a Home”—Teaching English through the Arts

If “a picture is worth a thousand words,” it is worth considering the amount of language acquisition that could be achieved through the use of pictures, paintings, and photography.   To non-native or ESOL speakers, the value and effects of this imagery and, by extension, the use of role playing, and portraying scenarios could be an incredible boon in English language learning.  For example, explaining the difference between the words “house” and “home” can be more easily expressed and internalized by depictions and creations of various images.  As Dionne Warwick so poignantly sang in 1964, “a house is not a home…when there's no one there to hold you tight.”  Connotation, denotation, additional vocabulary all play a part in adding to the 'picture.' Seeking papers on all related topics that explore how the arts might be incorporated into second-language instruction. Please email a 250-word Abstract to Myrna J. Santos at ESLCARE@aol.com by June 15, 2015.

 

A Twice Told Tale: Troubling African American Literature and the Other Arts

Toni Morrison argues, “There is a powerful impetus to stretch and freshen one’s work by collaborating with artists in genres other than one’s own.” In keeping with SAMLA¿s 2015 conference theme, “In Concert: Literature and the Other Arts,” this panel examines how African American literature influences, engages, troubles, and contests the Arts and vice versa.  The Arts include, but are not limited to, literary arts (poetry, short stories, novels, etc.), visual arts (painting, sculpture, photography, cinematography, architecture, etc.), performing arts (theatre, music, dance, etc.) and even the culinary arts (esp. folk food culture). Literature and the other arts are repositories of our histories, memories, and cultures; and help us sustain our communities in ways politics and economics cannot. To this end, this panel will attempt to address a few guiding questions: 1) How does African American Literature utilize the Arts to reiterate and emphasize cultural, social, political concerns? 2) How do the Arts employ subversive reading practices and strategies across genres, mediums, and subjectivities? 3) How do the Arts and African American Literature assert African American representation and subjectivity as or ruptured, dislocated, and incoherent? Possible approaches and topics include, but are not limited to:

·      African American Literature and Specific visual artists (i.e. Kara Walker, Kehinde Wiley, Hank Willis Thomas, etc.)

·      Performance art/artists; Or, the Writer as Performance Artist

·      Ekphrasis poetry and poetics

·      Literary illustrations of music (i.e. Jazz, Blues, Classical, Hip Hop, etc.)

·      Representation the Arts in the works of specific writers (i.e. Toni Morrison, Langston Hughes, etc.)

·      Film or Theatre Adaptations of African American Literature

Please email a 250 to 300-word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Robert Randolph, Jr. (rerandol@ncat.edu) by 19 June 2015 (using the subject line “SAMLA Twice Told Panel”).

 

Afterlife in the African Diaspora: A Seminar/Workshop

This seminar/workshop seeks to spark a critical conversation about how historical subjects and historical texts within the African Diaspora get re-fashioned, re-animated, and re-articulated, as well as parodied, nostalgized, and defamiliarized, to establish an afterlife for African Atlantic identities and narratives.  Participants will consider how “as transnational and transhistorical sites of memory” particular performances (textual, visual, or embodied) circulate and imagine anew the meaning of prior personal and textual narratives liberated from their originary context.  As part of the dialogue of this seminar/workshop, participants will examine how such historical performances, thus revitalized, transcend and speak across temporal and spatial boundaries not only to reinstate traditional meanings, but also to motivate fresh commentary and critique.  The organizers hope that this conversation might lead to a collection of essays focused on this important and underexplored area of inquiry. Potential topics include, but are not limited to, the following: specific historical figures, artists, or performers (e.g., Trayvon Martin, Bill Cosby, etc.) and their re-inscription and/or appropriation in twentieth- and twenty-first century cultural productions; “raising the dead” in the African Diaspora; invoking spectres and the spectral; traumatic repetition and/as afterlife; literary and/or cinematic depictions of slavery and its afterlife; legacies of lynching and racial terror; racialized horror and/or hauntings; monstrosities and/as racialized afterlife; sexual/gender transitioning and/as afterlife; reproduction and the afterlife; posthumanism and/as concepts of the afterlife; holographic and other posthumous forms of performativity/representation in new media. Please email a 300-word abstract and brief bio to Mae G. Henderson (hendersm@email.unc.edu) and Gene Melton (hgmelton@ncsu.edu) by 15 May 2015 (using the subject line “SAMLA Afterlife Seminar”). Those selected to participate in the seminar/workshop will be expected to submit an electronic copy of their completed paper (approx. 1500 words) no later than 1 October 2015 so that essays can be distributed to all participants for reading prior to the conference.

 

Archival Scholarship: The Art of the Archive/Art in the Archives 

This archival scholarship special session brings together scholars from literatures, languages, rhetoric and composition, and creative writing who engage in archival research. We’re looking for scholars to share their stories about doing archival work, to reveal the discoveries that emerge from archives, and to show how archival/historiographic method has informed other methods or aspects of their research. To connect with this year’s special focus, we are especially interested in proposals that relate to the theme of literature in concert with other arts, broadly defined: for example, the art of finding or constructing archives, working with museum or music or theater archives, working in concert with analog and digital archives, the art of funding archives and archival research, the art of the archivist, art discovered in archives. By June 15, 2015, please submit a 250-word abstract, 100-word bio, and A/V requirements to Lori Howard, Georgia State University, LNHoward@gsu.edu.

 

Art as Ethics / Ethical Art in the Works of George Eliot

In her famous essay, "The Natural History of German Life," George Eliot decried the recent attempts of English painters to recreate the "truthfulness" of Teniers and Murillo. Though Eliot would attempt to correct the errors in perception and representation through her writing, she continued to engage with other forms of art (paintings and music, specifically) throughout her life. In keeping with the theme of SAMLA 87, this panel looks for papers examining the moments in Eliot's works - her novels, poetry, nonfiction - wherein she contemplates other forms of art and their moral and ethical implications for both her characters and her readers. By June 15th, please submit a 150-300 word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Dan Abitz, Georgia State University, at dabitz1@gsu.edu. 

 

Beyond the Traditional Text: Deciphering Multimedia, Hypertext, and Graphic Narrative

Different types of Spanish, Latin American and Latin@ narrative offer the reader the opportunity to read a text beyond the traditional format. For instance, multimedia texts, hypertexts, graphic novels invite and challenge the reader to visit other media to make the text fully cohesive. We are seeking papers or multimedia presentations, in Spanish or English, focusing on such literary work from a Spanish, Latin American or Latin author. Presentation is limited to 20 minutes. Please email an abstract of 150 words in English or Spanish, describing your proposed presentation to: Dr. Astrid Billat, Associate Professor of Spanish, Meredith College, at the following email: billata@meredith.edu. Deadline is June 15, 2015

 

Collaboration & Betrayal 

In its aesthetic and political senses, "collaboration" has a twofold, seemingly contradictory meaning. On the one hand, collaboration names a creative and democratically communicative sharing between individuals, disciplines, traditions, etc. Yet, on the other hand, this positive sense is countered by negative connotations of traitorous and nefarious "collaborationism." While the positive sense of collaboration has found academic credibility in its interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary guises, the negative connotations of collaboration refer us to traditions of appropriation, marginalization, and usurpation. If the same term thus means to work-with and to work-against, to build and to betray (in a gesture of "hostipitality," as Derrida might say), then exactly how do we to understand the possibilities and efficacies of political, theoretical, and artistic collaboration? Collaboration re-constellates figures, texts, and theoretical approaches in the interest of further understanding (and perhaps healing). But, does collaboration also lead to collaborationist betrayals? Do poly-vocal and heterogeneous collaborations reconstitute the "other"? Who -- or what power -- lives in and authorizes the interstices of collaborations? Can there be a sharing that avoids becoming an ensnaring within yet another politics of representation? This panel seeks papers that negotiate the dynamics of "collaboration" in art, politics, philosophy, and the intersection(s) of the three. Although there is no required adherence to particular histories, geographies, canons, languages, media, or individual figures, papers that address the SAMLA 87 theme, "In Concert: Literature and the Other Arts," with a theoretical inclination are especially welcome. Potential contributors should submit a 300-word abstract, a brief bio, and any A/V requirements to the session chairs, Namita Goswami (Namita.Goswami@indstate.edu) and Tyler Williams (tmw26@buffalo.edu) by June 1, 2015.

 

Consuming Culture in Victorian and Edwardian English Literature

From the proliferation and commodification of print culture in the 18th century to the Forster's Education Act of 1870, those who consumed - and the way people consumed – the arts and culture at large changed irrevocably in England. These factors - among numerous others- culminate Leonard Bast’s feeble attempts to fit Ruskin's depictions of Venice to his basement hovel in E.M. Forster's classic Howards End. Bast's story, pushed to the margins of the novel, is primarily that of a working class individual attempting to better his position in life through the arts and culture. To expand this conversation, this panel seeks papers that examine the multiply diverse ways characters in late 18th to early 20th century British literature have consumed the arts and culture for a variety of reasons. Papers might look at the way working class characters use culture as a means of upward mobility, or how the landed gentry traffic in the arts as a form of consumable sociality. By June 15th, please send a 150-300 word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Dan Abitz, Georgia State University, at dabitz1@gsu.edu.

 

"Dangerously Close to One Another": Standing at the Intersection of Music & Poetry with Wyn Cooper

This panel welcomes papers about the poetic and musical lyricism exhibited in the work of SAMLA 87's Co-Creative Plenary, Wyn Cooper. Papers should address Cooper's work in the fields of poetry and/or music, and will be read as part of a roundtable discussion which will undertake an exploration of the intersections of music and poetry. By June 15th, please submit a 200-word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Andrea Rogers, Georgia State University, at arogers34@gsu.edu.

 

Diálogo Ecfrástico: Literatura y Pintura 

The "Diálogo Ecfrástico: Literatura y Pintura" session welcomes papers in English, Spanish or Portuguese about any aspect of "ecphrasis", critical or literary version: either as a "conversation" between Literature and Painting or a "verbal representation of visual representation,” such as verbal commentary / writing (poems, critical assessments, art historical accounts) on images. By June 10th, please submit a 200 to 300 word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Clinia Saffi, MFL Presbyterian College at cmsaffi@presby.edu 

 

Celebrating 25 Years of the North Carolina Literary Review

This year's conference theme just begs for papers on North Carolina's multi-talented writers and/or the combination of writing and art in our pages. All submissions will be considered for publication in the 25th issue. We would be interested in submissions related to writer/musician/artist Clyde Edgerton, writer/musician Bland Simpson, the incorporation of stories by Lee Smith and Jill McCorkle into the Good Ol' Girls musical, poetry that has been set to music, the art selected to complement the poetry and fiction in our issues. Other ideas welcome too. Submit a proposal (1-3 pages), brief bio, and A/V requirements to the editor, Margaret Bauer (bauerm@ecu.edu) by June 1.

 

Contemporary Literature and Popular Music

This panel invites conference papers that explore the reflexive relationship between contemporary (1975-2015) literature and popular music. Papers may focus on musicians that incorporate literary allusions or themes in individual songs or concept albums (The Mountain Goats, Nick Cave, The Hold Steady, Leonard Cohen, Sufjan Stevens, etc.), authors that incorporate frequent allusions to popular music in their work (Nick Hornby, Bret Easton Ellis, Alan Warner, etc.), or musicians that have also published fiction or poetry (John Darnielle, Sufjan Stevens, Leonard Cohen, etc). By May 30, please submit a 300 word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Mary McCampbell, Lee University, at mmccampbell@leeuniversity.edu

 

The End of Nostalgia: Music in Mad Men

Peggy Lee’s version of Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller’s song “Is that All There Is?” features prominently in the first episode of season 7b of Mad Men.  Indeed, the song alludes to the existential crisis of Don Draper (whose acquired wealth and success in the ad agency business have given way to emotional ennui) and the larger disappointment in the American political and cultural optimism of the 1960s.  In short, Peggy Lee’s song functions as a modern version of the Greek chorus in the episode as the viewer is impelled to contemplate the changing mood of society through the episode’s chosen soundtrack.  As a disciple of David Chase, who used popular music prominently in The Sopranos, Weiner’s use of music in storytelling is perhaps unsurprising.  Considering that the 1960s-1970s was a crucial time in American history with regards to a fracturing listening public, Don Draper has been described as belonging to Sinatra, and a nostalgic 1950s America, and not the iconoclastic, youth culture of the Beatles and Rolling Stones, however, music is both a source of contested values and figurative Greek chorus in Mad Men.  The following panel then seeks original essays then that examine the role of music in Matthew Weiner’s Mad Men.  What can Mad Mens use of music tell us about the show’s interest and attitudes towards the changing mores of the United States?  Please email paper topics of 500 words or less to Dotterman@Adelphi.edu.

 

 

Feminist Literature and Theory: Feminism and the Arts

This panel welcomes papers that engage the special session topic of "Feminist Literature and Theory" in relation to this year's SAMLA 87 theme. Proposals for projects that explore feminism in relation to the arts (broadly defined) are welcome.  By June 1, 2015, please submit an abstract of no more than 300 words along with a brief CV and A/V requirements to Stephanie Rountree, Georgia State University, at SRountree3@gsu.edu.

 

From the Page to the Italian Screen

From "Bicycle Thieves" to "Blow-Up" to "Gomorrah" many of Italy’s most famous and important films are adaptations of literary works. Rather than explore the differences between adaptations of a single work or author, such as Shakespeare or Jane Austen, this panel will discuss the issues surrounding one national tradition's cinematic and television adaptations, including films set in Italy, in Italian, or by Italian directors. This panel welcomes submissions that deal with any aspect of adaptation and Italian cinema, from the competition between the arts, to adapting short stories versus novels, to the differences between adapting a work from another language rather than from Italian, to the reasons for a particular director’s desire to adapt certain works (Visconti's "The Leopard" and "Death in Venice"), to multiple adaptations of one author's works (Alberto Moravia), to the challenges of working with a living author, like Elena Ferrante (Mario Martone), or the challenges of adapting the classics, like the "Decameron" (Pier Paolo Pasolini).By June 10th, please submit your abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Saskia Ziolkowski, Duke University, at sez6@duke.edu

 

From the Page to the Stage: Authorial Adaptation from Fiction to Drama 

Most stage adaptations are written by someone other than the author of the source material, but this panel will examine the issues and complexities that arise when an author chooses to transition a work from a narrative into a dramatic form. Given the unique aspects of dramatic writing (the economy of expression, the restrictions of time and space, the immediacy of the action, the reliance on dialogue and movement, etc.), what might motivate an author to adapt his or her fictional work and what does the adaption reveal about the original text (as well as the author)? Papers about contemporary writers are particularly welcomed. By June 1st, please submit an abstract of up to 250 words and brief bio to Renee Schatteman at schatteman@gsu.edu. 

Hybrid Networks: Literature and Science in Early Modern England

This panel welcomes papers on the various social, intellectual, or textual networks among authors and consumers of early modern literature and science. This panel seeks to understand what new networks of influence or collaboration we can discover by pairing disparate genres/fields of inquiry in the early modern period. Essentially, this panel asks: how can disparate or shared methods of signification within literary and scientific genres challenge our understanding of the early modern production of knowledge? Suggested topics include fictional representations of scientific communities, processes of experimentation both in literature and in contemporary practice, printers and publishers of fiction and science, generic divides between scientific and literary representations of methods, or figures and contemporary discourse surrounding the role of the scientific author. By June 1, 2015, please submit a 250-300 word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Katherine Walker, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, at walkerkn@email.unc.edu. 

 

Lapsed Catholics in American Fiction

Religion and its echoes in literature (its absent presence) is more and more becoming an aspect for literary analysis. This is apparent from recent studies on the subject such as John McClure’s Partial Faiths (2007), Amy Hungerford’s Postmodern Belief (2010), and recently Bryan Giemza’s Irish Catholic Writers and the Invention of the American South. This panel, “Lapsed Catholics in American Fiction,” looks at this absent presence in fallen away American Catholic authors. Over the past few years, the Catholic Church has launched a “Come Home” movement to bring back non-practicing Catholics, an estimated twenty million people, and perhaps, if it were denomination, the third largest in America. It is difficult to know what belief is. Similarly, it is difficult to know what we mean when we talk about unbelief. This panel examines American writers, like Cormac McCarthy and Don DeLillo, whose writing bears deeply the palimpsests of Catholic religion and faith. In doing so we hope to consider how fiction both embodies and mystifies faith and religious practice and posits the deep questions of theology. This panel welcomes any paper on American writers (preferably contemporary) whose work engages or intersects with the Catholic faith. By June 15, please submit a 300-word abstract to Jordan Carson, Baylor University, at Jordan _Carson@baylor.edu or Ryan Womack, Baylor University, at Ryan_Womack@baylor.edu.

 

Literary Monsters

In today's culture, it's almost impossible to avoid "monsters."  Straight from mythology and legend, these fantastic creatures traipse across our television screens and the pages of our books.  Over centuries and across cultures, the inhuman have represented numerous cultural fears and, in more recent times, desires. This panel will explore the literal monsters--whether they be mythological, extraterrestrial, or man-made--that populate fiction and film, delving into the cultural, psychological and/or theoretical implications.  Please submit a 250-300 word abstract, a brief bio, and any A/V needs by May 26, 2015 to Tracie Provost, Middle Georgia State College, at tracie.provost@mga.edu.

 

Lo Afro-Hispano en la literatura hispanoamericana

This session welcomes papers on any topic related to the session subject: open topic, open genre, open perioud, but presentations must examine works related to the Afro-Hispanic authors, characters, and themes. Please submit a one page (300 words) abstract by June 15th, 2015, to Dr. León Chang Shik, Claflin University, via email at Leoncs168@gmail.com.

 

Marcel Proust and the Arts

This panel invites submissions that consider any aspect of the topic “Marcel Proust and the Arts.” Among many other things, Á la recherche du temps perdu, Marcel Proust’s masterpiece, is a meditation on the importance of art in life and on the connections between literature and various arts, especially music and painting. Papers may be given either in French or in English and may not exceed 20 minutes. By June 1, 2015, please send an abstract of 250-300 words along with AV requests and a brief bio paragraph to Pascal Ifri, paifri@wustl.edu

 

Maya Literature or Maya Ts'íib: Others' Arts as Literature

From Womack’s Red on Red to Allen’s TransIndigenous, scholars and critics in Indigenous Studies are increasingly advocating for multimedia approaches to indigenous literatures that recognize literary aspects of expression in diverse forms such as carving in wood and stone, painting, and textile production. In keeping with the SAMLA 87 theme, this panel seeks to explore intersections of literature and the other arts in the context of contemporary Maya literatures. Please submit a 250-word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to co-chairs Paul Worley, Western Carolina University (pmworley@wcu.edu) and Tiffany Creegan Miller, Clemson University (tiffan4@clemson.edu) by May 31, 2015.

 

Modern Gothic Fiction

This panel welcomes papers that explore the modern gothic genre in modern and contemporary fiction.  Papers that concern the works of Susan Hill, Shirley Jackson or Angela Carter are of particular interest.  In addition, this panel will also consider papers that discuss the disentanglement of the gothic genre from the horror genre. Please submit a 300-word abstract, a brief bio, and any A/V requirements by June 15, 2015 to Amanda Boone, Georgia Perimeter College, at mary.boone@gpc.edu.

 

Modernism and Jazz 

In keeping with SAMLA 87’s theme, “Literature and the Other Arts,” this panel proposes to explore new approaches to literary Modernism and Jazz. While Jazz’s relationship to Modernism has long been recognized and often written upon, the past decade has seen a number of important new studies on the subject. In addition to critical literature, creative works in what has been termed the "Jazz tradition" continue to extend and transform our understanding of the modes of influence and interchange between the two arts. In exploring this topic further, papers on any subject related to Modernism and Jazz are welcome. For consideration, potential panelists should send abstracts of 250-300 words to Dr. Joseph Pizza at josephpizza@bac.edu by June 15, 2015.

 

Neoliberalism in Film and Literature

During the past seventy years, neoliberal thinkers have strategically reinvented classical liberal ideals in order to privilege a sense of personal freedom above the perceived overreach of government intervention. Once considered a fringe movement, neoliberalism has steadily become the central tenet of American life. It is now nearly impossible, for example, to imagine any mainstream voice espousing tax hikes or championing the sorts of policies enacted under Franklin Delano Roosevelt or Lyndon Johnson. Promises of privatization today trump collective action in virtually every aspect of life. This epistemic shift can be felt far and wide, from politicians to postmodern theorists.  The panel will investigate symptoms of/responses to this ideological shift, particularly in the areas of literature and film. Please submit a 300-word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Michael Blouin, Milligan College, at MJBlouin@milligan.edu.

 

Nadine Gordimer: Honoring Her Legacy

Gordimer is well known for her depiction of moral and racial issues, especially as related to life under apartheid in South Africa. With Gordimer’s passing in 2014, twenty years after the transition to majority rule, the question of her legacy is not immediately apparent. Given the current climate in which apartheid studies are beginning to be seen as no longer relevant to the future of South Africa, this panel welcomes papers that explore her unique literary contribution and influence and suggest how she should be remembered over time. Papers exploring her novels, short stories, or essays are all welcome. By June 15, please submit a 300-word abstract, brief bio, and A/V needs to Renee Schatteman at schatteman@gsu.edu.

 

New Connections for Scottish Studies

This panel welcomes papers that examine any aspect of Scottish literature and its connection to other arts, in line with this year’s conference theme. In particular, this panel is interested in papers that connect Scottish literature to other literatures and other arts of the wider world. By June 15, 2015, please send proposals (300 words maximum), a one-page CV, a brief bio, and any A/V requirements to Tim Hayes, Chowan University, at hayest@chowan.edu.

 

New Directions in African Literature

This panel welcomes papers that explore the contours and contexts of contemporary Africana Literature.  We invite presenters to consider potential new scholarly directions for emerging writers of African descent as well as established writers whose recent works address the imperatives of the current moment.  We are particularly interested in papers addressing the SAMLA 87 theme. Other themes that panelists might address in their work include, but are not limited to:

- Contemporary literary works that challenge or disrupt conventional understandings of form and/or genre

- Emergent literary platforms for publication and the relationship of literature to social media, digital publishing, multi-media distribution, etc.

- Contemporary definitions/articulations of Blackness and literary confrontations with themes of post-blackness and post-raciality

- 21st Century re-imaginings of “diaspora” and global understandings of race and identity- Literary responses to #BlackLivesMatter and other contemporary political movements

- Intersectional explorations of race and gender, sexuality, class, etc.

- Africana writers’ revaluation, reaffirmation, and/or rejection of longstanding black cultural traditions and social, political, and cultural institutions                                          

By June 10, please send abstracts (250-300) words to McKinley Melton (mmelton@gettysburg.edu) or Shauna Morgan Kirlew (shauna.kirlew@howard.edu).  Participants will be notified of panel acceptance by June 17th.  The 87th Annual SAMLA Conference will be held in Durham, NC, from November 13-15, 2015.

 

New Mediums of Modernism: Modernism and Popular Culture

Peter Nicholls argues that modernism should not be conceived of as a large single movement but as a multiplicity of smaller undertakings that at once reinforced, contradicted, drove, and inhibited one another. These diverse submovements were united only by their shared inspiration--the emerging technologies, ideas, and events that were rapidly remaking the world in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. This session aims to find new approaches to modernist studies, particularly in regards to popular reimaginings of modernist works and ideas that function beyond traditional literary forms. In this way, we hope to answer Rita Felski’s call to expand the locus of modernity outside of experimental aesthetics or the finely wrought artifacts of high modernism. Instead, this session looks to works that speak to the longings of everyday individuals--then and now. This emphasis is in keeping with the conference’s overarching theme of literature and other arts and will also create new dialogues about modernism in a way that draws attention to underappreciated works. This session is particularly interested in essays that focus on works beyond the written text, especially comics/graphic literature, radio, podcasts, video games, television shows, etc. Please send 300 word abstracts and a brief bio to SOrtolano@fsw.edu by June 12th. #PopModernism 

Nineteenth- and Twentieth-Century Latin American Literature

This panel welcomes papers about any aspect of Nineteenth and/or Twentieth Century Latin American Literature. By June 15, 2015, please submit a 200 word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Rudyard Alcocer, ralcocer@utk.edu.

 

Nineteenth-Century Reproductions and Patterns

Walter Benjamin has suggested that “the technology of reproduction detaches the reproduced object from the sphere of tradition,” yet this panel seeks to investigate the place of the reproduced object or patterns in nineteenth-century literature. While studies of the Industrial Revolution during the nineteenth-century have tended to focus on subjects such as labor and class, the focus of this panel examines the actual mass commodities produced during the age. Such commodities as china plate, wallpaper, and textiles are written into the literature of the period, but are often overlooked as art objects of the every-day in the nineteenth-century novel or poem. This panel welcomes submissions that widely consider the significance of reproductions and patterns in nineteenth-century American and/or British literature. By June 1, 2015, please send an abstract of 300-500 words along with AV requests and a brief bio paragraph to Rae Yan, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, at rxyan@unc.edu.

 

The Novel, Typography, and Graphic Design

 “We badly need a new way of thinking about novels that acknowledges their technological reality. We have to learn how to look at fiction as lines of print on a page and we to ask whether it is always the best arrangement to have a solid block of print from one margin to the other running down the page from top to bottom, except for occasional paragraph indentations.” - Ronald Sukenick, The New Tradition in Fiction
This panel welcomes papers that consider “new ways of thinking about novels,” particularly ones that address the relationship between the novel, typography, and graphic design as a way of addressing the novel’s materiality and its “technological reality.” From Laurence Sterne’s Tristram Shandy (1759) to Edward Abbott’s Flatland (1884) to Adam Thirwell’s Kapow! (2012), writers and publishers have experimented with various methods of presenting text on the page. But how is the presentation of written text in the novel influenced by the visual arts (broadly conceived)? How have authors and publishers been influenced by graphic design or design technologies as a way of presenting written text? What types of forms exist between the (typographically standard) novel and the (highly visual) graphic novel? Papers that address works composed after 1900 are especially welcome, as are paper that consider how typography and graphic design represent the “other arts” referenced in SAMLA 87’s theme: In Concert: Literature and Other Arts. By May 15, 2015, please submit a 500-750 word abstract, CV, and A/V requirements to Michael Griffin, Chair at michael.griffin@lmc.gatech.edu.

 

Organic Consumption of the Tissue of Blues

Blues music has not only been viewed as the secular spine of American music but also described as one of America’s most sincere forms of poetry.  And poets have historically and presently been impelled by and explored the blues, from Sterling Brown, Langston Hughes, to Sterling Plumpp, Wanda Coleman, and Kevin Young.  But more than merely investigating how these poets define, describe or portray the blues theme, blues songs or blues singers, this panel seeks papers that survey how poets, and not necessarily blues poets or while solely viewing blues poems, engage with blues.  Poet Cole Swensen has coined the term to “writewithize” when discussing ekphrastic poetry to describe the poet’s “living” or “walking along” (rather than forming an antagonistic relationship) with a visual representation.  Aligning with this approach, this panel takes its impetus from the “listening” of blues to explore how poets become “composers” of verbal art while experiencing blues music’s art.  Please send 300 word abstracts, a brief bio, and A/V requirements to Tiffany Austin, tiffanyuaustin@gmail.com   

Passing(s): A Nation in Transition

Studies of the nineteenth century have long been preoccupied with the problem of passing, passages, and border crossings, both physical and ideological. From westward expansion to the Civil War to the dramatic increase in the availability of transatlantic voyages, the geographical and ideological borders of the country seemed to grow less rather than more stable throughout the long nineteenth century. As a result, the various “passings” across these borders took on ever-greater significance. Whether this “passing” took the form of a slave crossing from South to North, a disease moving from one body to another, or a foreign commodity being integrated into a local community, the result is a nation increasingly conscious of its own permeability. This panel welcomes papers that identify and draw connections between some of the many forms that such “passings” took in the American literary imagination, drawing on the theme of “concert” between literature and social, political, and scientific ideas to reveal the complexity of the many simultaneous transformations the nation underwent in the decades surrounding the Civil War. Please submit a 250-300 word abstract, brief bio, and A/V needs by June 1, 2015 to Vera Foley (UNC-CH) at vfoley@email.unc.edu.

 

The Path to Publication: American Writers and Their Professional Networks

This panel invites papers that explore the relationship between literary production and the social arts by examining the ways in which the careers of American writers have been impacted by their professional networks. The goal of this panel is to consider the impact of interpersonal relationships on the formation and development of print culture, therefore projects that analyze a writer’s relationship with his/her editor(s), publisher(s), agent(s), and/or colleague(s) are particularly welcome. By June 24th, please submit an abstract of no more than 300 words along with a brief bio and A/V requirements to Summar Sparks, Bentley University, at ssparks@bentley.edu.

 

Performing Gender: Cultural Ideals, Expectations, and Representations of Gender in American and British Culture

This panel will explore gendered ideals and expectations over time - from the Victorian era to contemporary society - and consider how insidious these ideals and expectations of gender can be in American and British culture. Papers can draw from a variety of texts, both fiction and non-fiction, including novels, short stories, plays, popular magazines, and literary journals of the 19th and 20th centuries, as well as films and TV shows of the 20th and 21st centuries. Papers on any topic related to gendered ideals and expectations - and resistance to these ideals - might consider how some gendered expectations have changed while others have stayed the same over time and question what kind of impact these societal ideals have had and continue to have on our cultural consciousness. Papers addressing the topics of fashion or style in relation to gendered ideals would be of particular interest; papers addressing the conference theme of literature “in concert” with the other arts are also most welcome. How do cultural images and texts make meaning in regard to gendered expectations? By June 5, 2015, please send abstracts of 250-500 words along with AV requests and short bio to Loretta Clayton, Middle Georgia State College, at loretta.clayton@gmail.com.

 

Poet-Artist Collaborations

This panel explores the theme of "literature and the other arts" through the unique dynamic of word-image interaction situated in the poet-artist collaboration. Paper proposals addressing poet-artist collaborations from any time period found in ekphrasis, illustrated books, book arts, children's books, broadside printings, digital projects, and museum/site-specific installations and exhibits are welcome. By May 30, 2015, please submit a 300-word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Anne Keefe, University of North Texas, at anne.keefe@unt.edu.

 

Poetry and/as Visual Space, Visual Art

Poets have been working language into visual shapes at least since George Herbert, and it’s likely no one will ever surpass the union of poetry and visual art represented by the plates William Blake created. Publishers enlisting artists as illustrators for editions of famous poems is another matter, though the combinations have sometimes produced real synergies, as the publishing history of illustrated editions of Paradise Lost alone would attest. Modern poets have turned to small presses and handmade papers to recapture a sense of a book as a deliberately crafted artistic object (more than a mechanical reproduction) often with dramatic visual elements, like the vivid red and black ornamental initials, for example, in the Three Mountains Press folio edition of Pound’s A Draft of XVI Cantos (1925). Contemporary digital media offer far wider (and much less expensive) opportunities for visual settings for poetic texts. And though an element of visual design may not be an obvious part of the representation, visual art may be very much part of the context, of a conversation, since ekphrasis is one of poetry’s oldest modes. In fact, of course, the resources of visual space are always available to a poet, as the letters and words must always be arranged on the space of the page, and while there are conventions, there are no rules. This panel seeks essays that explore the relations between the textual and visual elements in poems that make some deliberate use of visual space or visual art (or both) to communicate their meanings. The focus may be on single poems, groups of poems, or whole volumes, and “deliberate use” is intended to be construed broadly, and certainly to include ekphrasis and new media display. Preference will be given to proposals focusing on poems published in the last hundred years. Send your 200-300 word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to William Waddell, St. John Fisher College, at bwaddell@sjfc.edu by June 15th.

 

Poetry in Concert: From Whitman to Wordsworth

This panel explores the poetic motifs, nuances, styles and themes that work in concert within the realm of literature and how the poetic art is associated with other art forms. This panel will discuss canonical poets ranging from Walt Whitman to William Wordsworth, including many others as well. It will serve to rediscover, discuss and illuminate poetic art form and its place within the overall theme of "In Concert: Literature and the Other Arts" for SAMLA 87. Paper proposals aligned with the conference theme are encouraged. Please submit a 300-word abstract, brief biography, and any additional requirements to Mostafa Jalal, Georgia State University, at mjalal1@gsu.edu by June 15th, 2015.

 

Reframing and Defaming Portraits in Fin-de-Siècle Literary and Critical Discourse

In keeping with the SAMLA theme “In Concert: Literature and Other Arts,” this panel welcomes papers dealing with synergy and/or tension between visual and textual representations of the individual in fin-de-siècle literary and critical discourse. By June 1st, please submit a 300-word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to co-chairs Elizabeth Cogan and Alexandra Slave, University of Oregon at ecogan@uoregon.edu and slave@uoregon.edu

 

Representations of the Creative Process on Film

This panel seeks submission of papers that address the “question of how the creative processes and works of authors, musicians, painters, and other artists” are represented on film.  By June 15, please submit a 250 word abstract, brief bio, and A/V request to Sean Dugan, Chair at sdugan@mercy.edu.

  

Las representaciones del Siglo de Oro

Esta sesión busca trabajos que estudien las representaciones/presentaciones artísticas del Siglo de Oro, no sólo las teatrales sino las musicales, tanto de los corrales como de la corte. Por favor enviar un abstracto de por lo menos 300 palabras a la Prof. Sánchez a rsanchez@sewanee.edu.

 

Severo Sarduy, the Image, and Media

The Cuban writer and literary theorist Severo Sarduy is a major figure in Latin American literary studies as a representative of the 1970’s neo-baroque and a practitioner of concrete poetry, but this panel seeks to shed light on Sarduy as a media theorist. Sarduy’s writings on the image draw on a vast archive of philosophy, psychoanalysis, aesthetics, and Marxism to revisit the problematics of the image in the Western tradition and how this problem is reconfigured in Latin American cultural production. Sarduy’s hermeneutics of the baroque, elaborated through his critical and literary writing, set the groundwork for an understanding of the image as a simulation, a copy which abolishes its object. This baroque hermeneutic posits a critique of imagistic figuration through figuration itself. Sarduy’s propositions regarding the image and simulation prove valuable not just for an analysis of cultural production in the Spanish-speaking world, but open up avenues of inquiry into the status of the image under globalized post-modernity. For Sarduy, the transhistorical baroque is the site of cultural hybridization, where race and gender are coded and re-coded under the conditions of coloniality. Sarduy’s writings are crucial, now more than ever, for showing us ways of reading the post-modern image as a site of cultural hybridization, particularly within inter-cultural media and art. This panel seeks inter-disciplinary and novel approaches to Sarduy’s oeuvre. We welcome papers that connect Sarduy’s literary and theoretical writings to:

---film, photography, and/or contemporary art

---media theory

---philosophy/and or aesthetics

---race and gender

---the transhistorical baroque

---cultural hybridity

By June 15th, please send your 250-word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Marta Nunez Pouzols, UNC Chapel Hill, at nunezm@email.unc.edu.

 

Shared Politics: Political Adaptations, Appropriations, and Influences

This panel seeks interesting and innovative papers in the field of adaptation studies. As Linda Hutcheon writes in A Theory of Adaptation, adapters “are just as likely to want to contest the aesthetic or political values of the adapted text as to pay homage.” Our panelists will explore the political uses to which adaptation is put, considering why and how authors adapt specific texts for political purposes. We will consider the possibilities and limitations of using adaptation as a political tool. This panel will accept papers on adaptation, appropriation, or influence in any time period, medium, or national context. Paper proposals addressing the SAMLA 87 conference theme of “In Concert: Literature and the Other Arts” (e.g., transmedial adaptation) will be given special consideration. By 1 June 2015, please submit a 300 word abstract, brief bio, and any A/V requirements to Phillip Zapkin of West Virginia University, at pzapkin@mix.wvu.edu.

 

“The Songs They Sang on Seventh Street”: Tracing the Inter-Arts Collaborations of the Harlem Renaissance Era

From Langston Hughes’ 1955 collaboration with photographer Roy DeCarava in The Sweet Flypaper of Life, Wallace Thurman’s 1929 collaboration with William Jourdan Rapp in Harlem: A Melodrama of Negro Life in Harlem, and the infamous collaboration of Langston Hughes and Zora Neale Hurston in Mule Bone: A Comedy of Negro Life, the Harlem Renaissance era was a time of flourishing inter-arts collaborations under-examined in contemporary criticism.  This panel therefore welcomes papers about the inter-arts collaborations of the Harlem Renaissance inspired by the SAMLA 87 theme, In Concert: Literature and the Other Arts. By May 15, 2015, please submit a three hundred to five hundred-word abstract, brief biographical statement, CV, and A/V requirements to Christopher Allen Varlack (University of Maryland, Baltimore County) at cvarlack@umbc.edu.

 

Spectacle of the Self, Spectacle of the City

The figure of the urban flâneur has, since the 19th century, inspired a variety of artists and critics to explore the relationship between city life and aesthetic production.  Looking beyond the act of city strolling, this panel seeks to examine a variety of modes of representation in the urban environment.  This kind of representation, or “contemplative aestheticism,” as R.V. Johnson in his book Aestheticism defines it, is “the idea of treating experience [. . .] as material for aesthetic enjoyment” (12).  Considering life “‘in the spirit of art,’ as something to be appreciated for its beauty, its variety, its dramatic spectacle” is a position adopted by many nineteenth-century aesthetes, dandies, and flâneurs and then revisited in a variety of ways by supporters of twentieth-century movements such as futurism, surrealism, formalism, camp, situationism and deconstruction (Johnson 19).  We welcome essays that explore “spectacles of the self” as a form of aesthetic creation, as constructed by authors, designers, composers and artists of every kind.  We also seek papers that analyze “spectacles in the city” as observed, recorded, or created by flâneurs, dandies, urban chroniclers, street artists, performance artists, and bold provocateurs.  Submissions might explore the dandy’s solipsistic performance of an elegant and refined spectacle of the self, the flâneur’s artistic search for urban spectacles of modern beauty, the fashionista’s construction of gender identity through sartorial performance, fashion as spectacular politics, performance/cinema/theater as metropolitan acts of mimesis or simulations of urban experience, etc.  We also encourage essays that present new theoretical considerations of the act of turning oneself into a spectacle or creating urban spectacles. By June 5, please submit a 300-word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to both Marylaura Papalas, East Carolina University, PAPALASM@ecu.edu, and Kelly Comfort, Georgia Institute of Technology, kcomfort@gatech.edu.  

Speculative Fiction

Speculative fiction covers a broad range of narrative styles and genres.  The cohesive element that pulls works together under the category is that there is some “unrealistic” element, whether it’s magical, supernatural, or even a futuristic, technological development: works that fall into the category stray from conventional realism in some way.   For this reason, speculative fiction can be quite broad, including everything from fantasy and magical realism to horror and science fiction: from Gabriel García Márquez to H.P. Lovecraft to William Gibson.  This panel aims to explore those unrealistic elements and all their varied implications about society, politics, economics, and more.  Please submit a 250-300 word abstract, a brief bio, and any A/V needs by May 20, 2015 to Lisa Wenger Bro, Middle Georgia State College, at lisa.bro@mga.edu.

 

The Spirituality of African American Literature

It is readily acknowledged that expressions of faith and spirituality are essential elements of the African American experience as well as African American cultural production. However, the diversity of spirituality articulated in African American literature is not often explored as a discrete subject. This panel welcomes papers exploring the ways in which works of African American literature serve as constructs or frameworks of spirituality. Paper proposals addressing the SAMLA 87 theme are especially welcome. By June 15, 2015, please submit a 300-word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Darren Elzie, University of Memphis, at djelzie@memphis.edu.

 

Sustaining the Avant-Garde in Literature and the Other Arts

In Theory of the Avant-Garde, Peter Bürger states, “The avant-garde is already historical.” Yet innovation has continued apace in the arts, with poetry becoming a particularly contentious site where writers raise questions about authorship and the boundaries between poetry and other media. This panel aims to discuss the similarities and differences amongst various avant-garde movements, especially those challenging Bürger’s suggestion that the avant-garde movements of the early-twentieth-century cannot be rivaled. When events such as the 1913 Armory Show publicized experimental visual arts and Stravinsky’s dissonant ballet The Rite of Spring famously offended audiences' ears, the most influential avant-garde movements of the early-twentieth-century were conspicuous in their attempts to appropriate the techniques of other media. Intertextual references to sources high and low became integral to avant-garde art, and many artists discussed their technique in the jargon of other art forms or rejected traditional boundaries between media. We hope to explore the continuing relevance of hybridity and intertextuality to conceptions of the avant-garde, as well as the many other ways in which the avant-garde continues to cross boundaries between genres and media. Possible topics could include, but are not limited to:

  • Explorations of commonalities between the strategies or source materials of avant-garde artists working in various media (For instance: Is there a writer whose approach could be compared to composer John Cage? What is the analogous movement in music to flarf poetry? Etc.)
  • Discussions of the ways in which contemporary avant-garde novelists, poets, filmmakers, and other artists challenge Bürger’s assertion. The history and future(s) of avant-garde art-forms, especially the ways in which hybridity and intertextuality have evolved throughout the history of the avant-garde alongside changing technological affordances
Abstracts of 300-words or less, along with a brief bio and A/V requirements, should be submitted to jessiraemorton@gmail.com by June 12, 2015.

 

Technology, Web 2.0 and 3.0

This panel welcomes papers about any aspect of Technology and language pedagogy. Paper proposals addressing how technology can be used to reinforce all communicative modes; facilitate performance-based assessments in real-life situations; and enable students to practice and share what they have learned are welcome. Panelists will introduce apps and demonstrate their uses applicable to all languages and skills to implement Web 2.0/3.0 technologies into any modern language classrooms. Using best practices in pedagogy and technology, research revealed significant changes in teaching practices and technology use. By June 18, please submit a [300-word] abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Silvia Byer, Park University, at silvia.byer@park.edu and Giovanna Summerfield, Auburn University, at summegi@auburn.edu.

 

Transforming Text and Images in Ovid's Metamorphoses

Of the ancient poets, Ovid is the most controversial in his own time and in later receptions. In particular Ovid's Metamorphoses naturally lent itself to visual representation, both affected by prior artwork and affecting subsequent art depicting Roman mythology. An ethically problematic poem, the Metamorphoses was received with anxiety, particularly for the dangerous lessons it could impart to vulnerable audiences, which resulted in adaptations that transformed image and text to guide readers’ interpretations. This panel will discuss representations of vignettes from Ovid's epic, such as illustrated editions and other visuals. Medieval scribes attempted to render his poetry safe for readers as evidenced by the Ovide moralisé tradition, and the invention of print and woodcuts in the Renaissance further complicated the proliferation of texts and images so aesthetically appealing but morally ambiguous. These are only some examples of Ovid's afterlives, and exhibit how textual apparatus and images affect literary meaning. Papers that consider how art and literature respond to the tensions within the Metamorphoses and how texts from a particular time adopt or resist depictions from Ovid are welcome. We are especially interested in investigating the visual nature of representations; if the passages from this poem encourage new forms and adaptations, how these interact with contemporary debates about education, print, gender, and other political and social controversies reveal aspects of Ovid's reception, and will be the focus of our panel. We hope to take a literary and art historical approach to thinking about Ovidian materials, and how this correlates with contemporary issues, in an attempt to understand the concerns about reproducing this poem. Please submit a 300 word abstract to mlearner@live.unc.edu by June 15th to Mary Learner, English department at UNC-Chapel Hill, and Katherine Calvin, Art History department at UNC-Chapel Hill. Also let us know of any A/V needs.

 

Victorian Literature and Childhood

 This panel invites submissions that consider representations of childhood in Victorian prose or poetry, including (but not limited to) conceptualizations of childhood in 19th-century scientific or medical writings, childhood paraphernalia, child authors or prodigies, the pre-adolescent body, and forgotten children. Transatlantic considerations are particularly welcome. By June 1, 2015, please send an abstract of 250-500 words along with AV requests and a brief bio paragraph to Doreen Thierauf, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, at thierauf@unc.edu.

 

Victorian Literature and Science

Literary scholarship has long traced the intersections between Victorian fiction and 19th-century science, particularly with regard to Darwinian, Spencerian, or proto-Freudian influences on narrative structures and character portrayals. This panel invites submissions that consider the influence of 19th-century scientific and/or medical writings on literature in the broadest sense (fictional representations, plots, or poetry). Transatlantic considerations are particularly welcome. By June 1, 2015, please send an abstract of 250-500 words along with AV requests and a brief bio paragraph to Doreen Thierauf, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, at thierauf@unc.edu.

 

Teaching Sustainability/Doing Environmental Activism

This roundtable session will explore ways in which the arts/humanities contribute to the understanding and framing of, along with solutions to, environmental problems in the world today. In particular, how can literature, film, visual art, drama, and music help us re-imagine our relationship with the earth and create what Joanna Macy calls a sense of “active hope.” What role do beauty and imagination play in a sustainable world?  How are literature and the arts particularly well suited to shift our cultural thinking about individual agency and collective social action? What interdisciplinary pairings and/or faculty/staff collaborations might be particularly effective for addressing the oft-neglected social justice aspect of sustainability’s “three-legged stool.” Papers on these or any other topics related to teaching sustainability and doing environmental activism are welcome.  By June 4, 2015, please submit a 500 word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Kathryn Finin, Kathryn.finin@oneonta.edu.

 

Visions of Motherhood (Francophone Literature and Cultures)

This panel wishes to explore contemporary representations (performances?) of motherhood - conceived broadly (birthing, maternity, motherland, mother tongue, etc. Please submit abstract of 250 words, brief bio, and A/V requirements, to Loic Bourdeau, loic.bourdeau@icloud.com. Deadline: June 15.

 

Women and Nature in Literature and the Arts

This panel welcomes papers about any aspect of the literary and/or visual representation of women's relationship with nature in especially works by women.  By May 15, please submit a 250-word abstract, brief biography, and any A/V requirements to Kathleen Anderson, Palm Beach Atlantic University, at kanderson67@hotmail.com.

 

Women Troubling, Troubling Women: The Problem of Women in Contemporary American Literature

This panel welcomes papers that examine the role of women in contemporary American literature. In particular this panel seeks to address the ways in which women are figured in terms of "trouble"--whether they are, themselves, troubled, or whether they trouble existing themes within the narratives. Please submit a 300 word abstract and brief bio (with an email address) and any A/V requirements by June 1 to Jennifer Ho, Associate Professor, English & Comparative Literature, UNC Chapel Hill, jho@email.unc.edu.

 

Work, Class, Labor, and Culture in American Literature: Labor, Art, & Politics in American Literature and Culture

This panel welcomes papers focusing on the intersection of labor, art, and politics in American literature and culture. Suggested topics range from African-American work songs to regionalist painters such as Thomas Hart Benton and Grant Wood to representations of labor by authors from Rebecca Harding Davis to Tillie Olsen and John Steinbeck. In essence, we are interested in papers that discuss how artistic representations of all types engage with the politics of labor. By June 1, 2015, please submit a 250-word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Owen Cantrell, Georgia State University at ocantrell1@gsu.edu.

Peter Nicholls argues that modernism should not be conceived of as a large single movement but as a multiplicity of smaller undertakings that at once reinforced, contradicted, drove, and inhibited one another. These diverse submovements were united only by their shared inspiration--the emerging technologies, ideas, and events that were rapidly remaking the world in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. This session aims to find new approaches to modernist studies, particularly in regards to popular reimaginings of modernist works and ideas that function beyond traditional literary forms. In this way, we hope to answer Rita Felski¿s call to expand the locus of modernity outside of experimental aesthetics or the finely wrought artifacts of high modernism. Instead, this session looks to works that speak to the longings of everyday individuals--then and now. This emphasis is in keeping with the conference¿s overarching theme of literature and other arts and will also create new dialogues about modernism in a way that draws attention to underappreciated works. This session is particularly interested in essays that focus on works beyond the written text, especially comics/graphic literature, radio, podcasts, video games, television shows, etc.
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,Please send 300 word abstracts and a brief bio to SOrtolano@fsw.edu by June 12th
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