SAMLA 92 | Jacksonville, FL | 13-15 Nov 2020

Calls for Papers (CFPs)

SAMLA welcomes broad participation in planning, chairing, and presenting as part of sessions for its next conference, SAMLA 92, taking place on November 13–15, 2020, as a virtual conference through Accelevents.

Each Session Chair writes their own Call for Papers (CFP) and submits it to SAMLA for approval and posting. Presentation abstracts are then directed to the individual Chair, who selects and notifies their panelists accordingly. The Chair then submits information about the panel they have selected to SAMLA for inclusion in the conference program.

Please read the instructions below for further details and links.

Jump to Info for:

CHAIRS

or

PRESENTERS


Instructions for Prospective Chairs

For prospective Session Chairs for SAMLA 92, the first step in the process is to decide on the type and format of the Session:

  • Session Types include Regular Sessions, Affiliated Group Sessions, and Special Sessions. For your convenience, we have defined these session types here. Unless you are representing an existing Affiliated Group or Regular Session, your CFP will be classified as a Special Session. If you represent an organization looking to become an Affiliated Group, or if you are unsure if your session is a recurring Regular Session, please email Dan Abitz at [email protected].
  • Session Formats include Traditional Sessions, Roundtables, Workshops, Readings, and more. We have described the most common formats here. SAMLA welcomes other session formats when applicable.

Next, prospective session chairs should prepare their CFP language and submit a CFP form for SAMLA's approval. A CFP form should be submitted for each session, even if the session already has a full list of presenters. SAMLA will post all approved CFPs below to encourage scholars to submit abstracts to Session Chairs for approval and, ultimately, inclusion in the conference program.

When selecting panelists, Chairs are asked to take note of the eligibility guidelines posted in the "Instructions for Prospective Presenters" section below.

Chairs may choose to widen their selection process by posting their CFPs to other databases

Calls for Papers received by March 1, 2020 will be printed in the digital newsletter, SAMLA News, in addition to being posted on this page. CFPs submitted after March 1st will not be included in the newsletter but will be posted on this page. 

The final deadline to submit a CFP is July 3, 2020.


Instructions for Prospective Presenters

Scholars interested in presenting at SAMLA 92 should review the approved Calls for Papers (CFPs) below and follow any submission instructions set by the individual Session Chairs. 

Should you not find a session CFP that fits your interests, please consider submitting your individual abstract(s) to our General Call for Papers.

SAMLA asks that you abide by certain eligibility guidelines when planning your participation in our conference:

  • All conference participants will need to become SAMLA members AND will need to register for the conference. There are two separate forms to fill out and two separate payments to be rendered to meet these requirements.
  • A member may present only one traditional paper per SAMLA conference. A member may participate in other forms as long as the nature of each panel or presentation differs significantly. This may include, but is not limited to: serving as both Chair and Panelist in one’s own panel; serving as Chair in one session and Panelist in another session; serving as Panelist both in a traditional panel and on a roundtable, reading, or workshop discussion; serving as Panelist while also presenting on our Poster Session. If a member is presenting in multiple formats, it is expected and required that the content of the presentations will also be different. Additionally, members are welcome to serve as Chairs, Co-Chairs, and/or Secretaries for multiple panels.
  • SAMLA is proud to provide ample space for undergraduate research at its annual conference. We invite undergraduate students to participate in Undergraduate Research Forum (URF) panels or our annual Friday-night Poster Session. According to SAMLA guidelines, however, undergraduate students are not permitted to participate in non-URF sessions.


Approved CFPs by Category

NOTE: You can jump to a specific subject by selecting a category from the list below, or you can hit Control-F or Command-F to enter a search term (Chair name, keyword, etc).

African / African American Studies

American Studies

Asian / Asian American Studies

Caribbean Studies

Creative Writing

English Studies (UK & Ireland)

Film Studies

French Studies

Gender & Sexuality Studies

German Studies

Hispanic Studies

Interdisciplinary Studies

Italian Studies

Luso-Portuguese Studies

Other Languages & Literatures

Pedagogy

Rhetoric & Composition

Slavic Studies


African / African American Studies

BLACK GIRL BANNED: REBELLION AND RADICAL BLACK GIRLHOOD IN LITERATURE

The novels of Black women authors like Toni Morrison, Alice Walker, Jamaica Kincaid, and Angie Thomas have been challenged and banned in a host of educational settings. While the “appropriateness” of the content is questioned, these Black women novelists and their characters combat censorship and the status quo to reveal the truths of Black girlhood. Despite being policed, surveilled, and censored in the material world and fiction, Black girls find creative ways to assert and insert themselves in spaces where their behavior may be considered “scandalous” “rebellious” or “womanish.” They often engage in what Aimee Meredith Cox calls shapeshifting to “confront, challenge, invert, unsettle, and expose the material impact of systemic oppression.” Aligning with the SAMLA conference theme Scandal! Literature and Provocation: Breaking Rules, Making Texts, this panelseeks papers that discuss the ways Black women writers and Black girl characters “make” and “break” (counter)narratives of girlhood. Topics include but are not limited to:

  • Banned/controversial texts by Black women
  • Black girls’ transgressions/deviant behavior
  • Black girl activists
  • Representations of rebellious or radical acts
  • Depictions of feminist and womanist girls

Please submit a 250-300 word abstract, a brief bio, and a/v requests to  Ebony Perro, Tulane University at [email protected] by July 21, 2020.

THE HARLEM RENAISSANCE AT 100
AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE

The year 2020 marks the centennial of the Harlem Renaissance, the flowering of African American arts and letters that occurred during the 1920s and 1930s. Over the past century, the Harlem Renaissance has proven to be a foundational yet ever-evolving cultural category, as each successive generation of writers and scholars has engaged with the period in new and different ways. As a result, the canon has continually shifted and expanded through a legacy of rediscoveries. The most prominent rediscovery being the reevaluation of Zora Neale Hurston’s Their Eyes Were Watching God during the 1970s, and the continued publications of her previously lost works. In just the last decade, more than a dozen new Harlem Renaissance works have been published. Therefore, 2020 presents an ideal opportunity to take stock of what the Harlem Renaissance now means, especially in an era when we understand identity in increasingly complex ways and have unprecedented access to Harlem Renaissance works and scholarship via the Internet. We invite paper proposals on any aspect of the Harlem Renaissance. Topics might include, but are not limited to:

  • The expansive Harlem Renaissance canon
  • The publication history of Harlem Renaissance works
  • The current role of the Harlem Renaissance in African American literary and cultural studies
  • Previously marginalized African American writers, texts, or genres from the 1920s and 1930s
  • How the Harlem Renaissance has been remembered in films / documentaries, archives, and online
  • How subsequent writers have re-written or engaged with the Harlem Renaissance
  • The state of Harlem Renaissance scholarship and its recent trends
  • The Harlem Renaissance and feminism
  • The Harlem Renaissance and gender and / or sexuality
  • The Harlem Renaissance and the Black Arts Movement
  • The Harlem Renaissance and Hip-Hop
  • The Harlem Renaissance and Black Lives Matter
  • The Harlem Renaissance and digital humanities
  • The Harlem Renaissance and performance studies
  • The Harlem Renaissance and interracial / Critical Mixed-Race studies
  • The Harlem Renaissance and passing / identity politics 
  • Teaching the Harlem Renaissance to 21st century students
  • The Harlem Renaissance and geography / its global reach
  • The Harlem Renaissance and class dynamics
  • The Harlem Renaissance and the conference theme of scandal / provocation
  • The Harlem Renaissance in the next century

Please send 250-word proposals, brief bios, and A/V requests to Donavan L. Ramon at [email protected] and Clark Barwick at [email protected] by July 1, 2020.

“TO EXPRESS OUR INDIVIDUAL DARK-SKINNED SELVES WITHOUT FEAR OR SHAME”: PROVOKING RESTRICTED IMAGES OF BLACKNESS IN THE HARLEM RENAISSANCE AND BEYOND
THE LANGSTON HUGHES SOCIETY

In many respects, through his key role in articulating the zeitgeist of the New Negro Movement, William Edward Burghardt Du Bois helped set the tone for the African-American literary tradition of the time. Through his writing, he worked desperately to counter controversial stereotypes about the perceived intersection between Blackness and primitivism that he saw as dangerous to African-American advancement, claiming that “the instinctual, the sensual, and the animal” in Black-authored texts was antithetical to “the genteel image of respectability he, as a black leader, had strived to attain for his people” (Pontuale 65). Those images, he wanted to phase out from the national stage, to be replaced by figures from the intellectual vanguard and Black middle class who came to embody the possibilities of racial uplift in the twentieth century.

Despite these efforts at constructing a New Negro in contradistinction to the Brute Negro and exotic primitive, however, there was an equally powerful movement pushing toward increased diversity and representation of Blackness in art. This movement saw the more genteel image advocated by Du Bois and others as artificial, perhaps just as problematic as the white-authored stereotypes of the razor-wielding, sexually promiscuous Black figures cemented in the popular culture of the time. As a result, luminaries such as Langston Hughes, Claude McKay, Zora Neale Hurston, and others sought to celebrate folk culture and to construct an image of Blackness in text that provoked those very restrictions—a wave of literature that was entertaining, socially conscious, and politically engaged.

In keeping in line with the conference theme for the ninety-second annual South Atlantic Modern Language Association (SAMLA) conference, the Langston Hughes Society invites presentations on authors of the Harlem Renaissance and beyond who critiqued, condemned, and provoked restricted images of Blackness in an effort 1) to avoid reinforcing monolithic representations of Blackness in the U.S. cultural imagination, 2) to demand a vision of racial uplift that does not abandon the under-educated and working class, and 3) to destabilize prescriptive notions of Black artists’ responsibilities in defining a uniquely Black art. Special consideration will be given to proposals with an emphasis on the work and/or legacy of Langston Hughes.

Please send proposals of no more than five hundred words (for a fifteen to twenty-minute paper) to Dr. Christopher Varlack, President ([email protected]) and Dr. Richard Hancuff, Secretary ([email protected]) no later than May 29, 2020, with a response expected no later than June 1, 2020. Note that in addition to paying the membership and registration fees for SAMLA, presenters must also be members of the Langston Hughes Society by the time of the conference in order to present. Please indicate any audio-visual needs (if essential) in your email.

IMPRISONED VOICES: BLACK WRITERS RE-IMAGINING CONFINEMENT

This roundtable addresses how black writers in the 20th- and 21st-century approach various spaces and moments of imprisonment. Specifically, the panel listens for and responds to the quieted, silenced, and marginalized voices not only in the US but globally through discussions on, but not limited to, imprisonment in terms of slavery, the afterlife of slavery, and social death; black writers such as Toni Morrison, Michelle Alexander, and Sapphire; interdisciplinary approaches that incorporate literary and critical race theory, gender, and disability studies; subversions of imprisonment that address literary authority; and confinement in the prison industrial complex. Please submit abstracts of no more than 200-250 words, a short bio, and any A/V requests to Delia Steverson, University of Florida, at [email protected] by August 31, 2020.

RALPH ELLISON AND EXISTENTIALISM

Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man can be understood as an existential novel about consciousness and memory rooted in the fragmentation of both as announced in the narrator’s famous first lines, “I am an invisible man.” Ellison in his recently published voluminous letters frequently mentions his study of existential writers and thinkers such as Andrew Malraux, Kierkegaard, and Sartre. The panel invites papers that address the existential themes and features of Invisible Man and the novel’s connection and/ or link to later existential narratives after Ellison such as Walker Percy’s The Moviegoer and Colson Whitehead’s Sag Harbor.  Published just 3 years before the Montgomery Bus boycott in 1955, Invisible Man had little impact on M. L. King.  King occasionally mentions existential philosophers in his writings, but revealed to Robert Penn Warren in a recorded interview he had not read Invisible Man.  By contrast, some would argue that without Ellison, there would have been no President Barack Obama. Clearly his intellectual formation, election strategy, public character and a commencement speech delivered by his wife at Tuskegee University (where Ellison attended) show a rootedness in Ellison’s novel. The Obama-Ellison connection clearly illumines that there might be an unexplored link between existentialist literature and Obama’s public character that might be further developed. Ancillary considerations might address the question of whether existentialist literature advances the cause or awareness of social justice. Indeed, one of the most celebrated of existentialist writers, John-Paul Sartre, did not pose a threat to the Nazis in their occupation of Paris during World War II. The Nazi censors allowed Sartre to stage his existentialist plays apparently concluding such drama posed little threat to their merciless tyranny and systematic antisemitism. Does Invisible Man occupy a similar position in relation to the American Civil Rights movement?  Unlike James Baldwin and Richard Wright, Ellison has been faulted for his lack of activism and the perception of an aloof refinement as the United States in the 1960s and now in 2020 has and is experiencing protracted activism and social protests.

Abstract (300 words) by July 29, 2020
Benjamin B. Alexander, Ph. D. ([email protected])
Acting Chair, Walker Percy Society
Professor of English and Political Science
Franciscan University of Steubenville (ret).


^ Return to Category List


American Studies

AMERICAN LITERATURE AND THE MARKET

Literature needs a market to reach its audience. Although the economic foundations of literary history have long been neglected, recent scholarship has increasingly emphasized how American writers from Henry James to Octavia Butler had to make strategic choices to position their work within the literary marketplace. This panel aims to explore the business of publishing, advertising, networking, and funding that has shaped American literary history. Papers might consider how individual authors negotiated challenges in their contemporary field of cultural production; how editors, magazines, and publishing houses contributed to the shaping of what we now consider literary history; and how the shifting market for American literature has shaped which authors have been praised, consecrated, and taught--and which authors have been overlooked--for the two hundred years. Please email abstracts of approximately 300 words with A/V requests to Ian Afflerbach at [email protected] by July 24, 2020.

BREAKING WESTERN LITERARY RULES: THE RECLAMATION OF NATIVE AMERICAN ETHOS

Western interpretations of Native American culture, identity, and selfhood have attempted to erase the Native American voice; thus, threatening the sustenance of Native American orality. This western scandal reduced various Native American cultural identities to a series of homogenized stereotypes. Consequently, many pioneers of Native American literature have deconstructed western representations in and through their own narratives. This panel explores the ways in which various Native American authors and poets have rebelled against western literary constructs, broken rules of western modernity, and posited reformed literary methods to reclaim their Native ethos and correct false-representations of Native American identity and culture. Please email abstracts of up to 300 words to [email protected] by June 8, 2020.

COMMUNITY FORMING UNDER THE CAPITALOSCENE
NEOLIBERALISM IN LITERATURE AND MEDIA STUDIES

Jason Moore in his introduction to Anthropocene or Capitalocene? (2016) remarks, “Capitalocene signifies capitalism as a way of organizing nature’s a multispecies, situated, capitalist world-ecology.” Capitalocene, therefore, stands for a motion, a reproducing technology, that manifests and re-manifests human life and relationalities between human and nature under the logic of aggressive material dispossessions and accumulations. The examinations and resistance against the functioning of capitalocene are especially crucial in facing the public health crisis one would remember as the COVID-19 and the racial conflicts intertwines with its narrative with the perception of the pandemic. Recognizing forms of cruelty and violence produced on the global level through land seizing, outsourcing factory construction, immigration bans, technology sanctions, etc, this panel invites proposals that examine closely the metrics of power under work in sustaining and producing the system of capitalocene and the disastrous consequences that are the reality and future for different communities. As importantly, this panel invites insights and critical readings that contextualize alternatives that are non-conformant to the oppressive capitalistic way of life. Specifically, this panel stresses the importance of community and the significance bore by the past and future of community building. Communal thinking posts firmly in opposition to the drastic separatism and individualism promoted as the logic of subjectivization which has been experienced by large populations of diaspora. How have people survived the violence of exploitation in communities? How do we form communities in a day and age where neoliberalism and neoliberal racialization dominates? How can community forming be a coalitional and transnational experience? Topics could include but are not limited to:

  • Spatiality
  • Communality
  • State(less)ness
  • Women of Color politics and activism
  • Indigenous Studies
  • Neoliberal multiculturalism/racialization
  • Resurgence/Insurgence
  • Oppositional thinking
  • Marronage

Please send submissions to Chenrui Zhao at [email protected] by August 3, 2020.

ELIZABETH MADOX ROBERTS: A WRITER OF SOCIAL AGITATION?
ELIZABETH MADOX ROBERTS SOCIETY

This panel responds to an assertion made by Allen Tate that the works of Elizabeth Madox Roberts reject the expectation of social agitation, asking the question: but do they? In conversation with the theme of SAMLA 92, Scandal! Literature and Provocation: Breaking Rules, Making Texts, this panel requests papers that analyze the ways in which Elizabeth Madox Roberts' prose works and poetry represent the plight of women, both poor and not, and showcase the societal ills of misogyny, racism, and other forms of oppression. Possible topics include: representation of domestic violence and sexual assault; the silencing of women in both rural and aristocratic communities in early 20th C. Kentucky; the strength and agency of women; etc. Papers should be no more than 15 minutes in oral presentation. Please email titles and abstracts of 250 words and professional bios of 50-100 words to Eleanor Hough (Dept. of English, Binghamton University, [email protected]) no later than June 15, 2020.

EUDORA WELTY'S SPECTACLE OF SCANDAL
EUDORA WELTY SOCIETY

Guy Debord examined the spectacle through the Marxist lens and discerned that the spectacle draws the public gaze through a collection of images that contain signs that feed on and feed the socially dominant ideology. In other words, spectacles perpetuate the images the ruling class produces to subjugate and degrade. Thus, spectacles are discourses about the ruling class’s “a self-portrait of power” (Debord, Society of the Spectacle). A scandal is a spectacle that violates the social norms of the ruling class, even as it draws the public gaze through sensationalizing the social transgression. If we treat scandal as a spectacle that reveals the codependent relationship between social reality and social power that seeks to shape the appearance of social reality through images, then we may analyze spectacles of scandal as tools that confront social practice while also being part of that practice.

Welty fans and scholars alike know there is no shortage of scandal as spectacle in Eudora Welty’s works or in her performance as a female writer. Because spectacles serve the ruling class, they can often hide a subversion of the images that redirect ridicule or criticism at the ruling class. In other words, spectacles can wreak havoc on interpretation. Given Welty’s adroit use of spectacle, it is not surprising that, despite the political hiding within the spectacle, her critics have stated that Welty avoids the political. Harriet Pollack’s and Suzanne Marrs’ book Eudora Welty and Politics uncovers the political in Welty’s works. In keeping with SAMLA’s theme, the panel “Eudora Welty’s Spectacle of Scandal” looks for papers that explore the ways in which Welty herself or her works create spectacles out of scandals, social transgressions, and rebellions that ultimately engage in the political, make fun of the ruling class, challenge social norms, ideology, and laws. How may the visibility of these spectacles or scandals spotlight the need for change or energize a revolution against the status quo? How may the language within these spectacles serve as signs already made within the ruling production even as the alienated real rises up through the spectacle? How do the visuals of these spectacles move readers to an awareness of social injustices impacting those caught in the intersections of oppression?

Presentation abstracts (300 words) should be sent to Dr. Ren Denton at [email protected] by June 15, 2020.

FLANNERY O'CONNOR: BREAKING (O'CONNOR'S) RULES
FLANNERY O'CONNOR SOCIETY

The Flannery O’Connor Society invites papers on topics relevant to O'Connor's interpretations of and commentary on her own work, including but not limited to: the value of deferring to O'Connor's readings of her own stories, O'Connor's religious vision, O'Connor's definitions of grotesque or gothic, or O'Connor's politics. We want to know: how much should we let O'Connor dictate the meaning of her work? Please send a 300-word abstract by June 15, 2020, to Sarah Shermyen, University of Georgia, at [email protected]. Please also include a brief bio and any A/V requirements in your abstract.

FLANNERY O'CONNOR: OPEN TOPIC
FLANNERY O'CONNOR SOCIETY

The Flannery O’Connor Society invites papers on any topic in the life and works of Flannery O’Connor. Please send 300-word abstracts by June 15, 2020, to Sarah Shermyen, University of Georgia, at [email protected]. Please also include a brief bio and any A/V requirements in your abstract.

"GIRL REPORTERS" & BREAKING THE RULES FOR BREAKING NEWS

In Front-Page Girls (2006), Jean Marie Lutes asserts that newspaper women in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries established a lively tradition of journalism that highlighted the sensational and used their own bodies as "conduits for the news,” which propelled these women into their stories and into their readers’ minds (6).These "girl reporters" often simultaneously generated serious attention and invited ridicule, largely due to the fact that they were frequently willing to benefit from their shock value. This panel aims to explore both real newspaper women (especially "stunt reporters" like Nellie Bly and Annie Laurie) and fictional female reporters. Please email abstracts of approximately 300 words to Debbie Lelekis at [email protected] by July 27, 2020.

HEMINGWAY'S SHORT STORY CYCLES
THE HEMINGWAY SOCIETY

The Hemingway Society session for the 2020 SAMLA conference in Jacksonville solicits papers on Hemingway’s short story cycles. With attention focused on In Our Time, Men Without Women, and Winner Take Nothing, this panel will explore themes that unify and resonate among individual stories within each book. Please send a 200-word abstract with a brief CV by July 20, 2020, to Steve Florczyk, Hampden-Sydney College, [email protected].

MAMA DON'T ALLOW: TRANSGRESSIVE SONGS AND PROVOCATIVE SONGWRITERS
AMERICAN LYRICISTS

“Mama Don’t Allow: Transgressive Songs/Provocative Songwriters” invites paper proposals that explore songs and songwriters that are transgressive, provocative, and/or “scandalous.” A panel that focuses on songwriters instead of performance, American Lyricists asks for analysis of the lyrical and social influence of the song, with a focus on either a work or works of a single writer (or songwriting team) or the thematic treatment of a theme by numerous songwriters. This panel defines “American” beyond the United States borders. When making a submission, bear in mind that the songwriter-centered focus of this panel makes performance relevant only when the songwriters perform their own work. Please send your 250-word proposal by May 15, 2020, to Jim Clark, [email protected].

MUSLIMS IN AMERICA

This panel intends to examine the works of Muslim American poets, novelists, playwrights, jazz musicians, punks, hip hop artists, filmmakers, and visual artists. Papers are invited that explore the diverse compositions of Muslim American identities in cultural texts as they challenge and engage with the canonical codes and sociopolitical norms of national, theoretical, literary, and aesthetic spaces. With the theme of SAMLA 92—Scandal! Literature and Provocation: Breaking Rules, Making Texts—panelists are asked to consider how these writers and artists employ different media in their articulation of assimilation, alterity, dissent, and transgression as Muslim Americans in high or low art forms. Please submit a 300-word abstract, with a short biography and A/V requirements, to Mahwash Shoaib ([email protected]) by July 30.

POP SOUTHS: SCANDALIZING THE REGION
SSSL'S EMERGING SCHOLARS ORGANIZATION (ESO)

Keeping with SAMLA 92’s theme, this panel seeks abstracts linking souths that capture the popular imagination, provoking and exposing both region and nation. We are interested in exploring how popular narratives from and about the South scandalize the United States, how scandalous narratives from and about the United States popularize different souths, as well as how people from regions around the world enjoy being scandalized by the South. How do people’s conceptions of the South as both a maker and breaker of rules shed light on intersections of race, gender, and sexuality? How do popular stories about regions help us better understand national nuances of lived experience and personal identity at global scales? We welcome submissions focusing on a wide range of perspectives, but we are especially interested in work that queries long-established views of the solid South, which is so often characterized as white, cisgender, heterosexual, able-bodied, and agrarian. We will give special consideration to papers that discuss a wide range of popular media or authors who use popular media to re-write perceived norms of race, gender, and sexuality across and beyond the region.

While all papers should consider the topic of souths and popular media, ESO is especially interested in the following topics:

  • Queer or Quare Souths
  • Social (Media) Souths
  • True Crime and the South
  • Streaming Souths
  • Blues, Rock & Roll, Soul, and Hip-Hop souths
  • Sensational and Sentimental Literature about the South
  • Slavery, Racial Terror, and Mass Incarceration in the South
  • Radio, Television, and the Long Civil Rights Movement Beyond the South
  • Online Media, Region, and Electoral Politics
  • Journalism and Marketing about the South
  • Disability and Accessibility across Souths
  • Global South, Appalachian South, or Circum-Caribbean Souths
  • Playing the South: Video Games and Southern Studies
  • Souths in Memes and Meme Culture

We welcome participants inside and outside of southern studies, as well as those who have wide-ranging conceptions of both Pop and South. Please send 500-word proposals and A/V requirements to [email protected] by August 14, 2020.

SCANDAL! NATIVE AMERICAN BOARDING SCHOOLS IN AMERICAN FICTION

This panel welcomes submissions on education and assimilation of Native Americans as explored in American fiction. Willa Cather’s Death Comes for the Archbishop, D’Arcy McNickle’s The Surrounded, Toni Morrison’s [A Mercy], and Leslie Marmon Silko’s Gardens in the Dunes each turn a critical eye towards the educational practices forced upon Indigenous children by Christian missionaries and the American government from the late 19th century to the early 20th century. In conversation with SAMLA 92, Scandal! Literature and Provocation: Breaking Rules, Making Texts, panelists are asked to examine these and/or other fictional texts that explore the history of Native American boarding schools through plot, character, author, narratology, audience, language, and literary technique. Papers should be no longer than 15 minutes in oral presentation. Please submit a 250-word abstract, brief biographical statement (including academic affiliation and contact information), and A/V requirements to Valerie A. Smith, Georgia State University, at [email protected] by June 1st, 2020.

SCANDALOUS HUMOR / HUMOROUS SCANDAL
AMERICAN HUMOR STUDIES ASSOCIATION

Both perennial elements of a society, scandal is often fodder for humor, and humor fodder for scandal. From their subversion of existing power structures, to issues of critical reception, to objectionable behavior on the part of creators, humorous texts have exposed, caused, and responded to many instances of cultural uproar. This panel will explore the ways that humor and scandal are intimately related. Papers and presentations on any aspect of humor expression are welcome, including but not limited to analysis of stand up or sketch comedy, satire, political cartoons, satirical activism, parody, literature, television, film, or music. Please submit a 250-word abstract, brief biographical statement (including academic affiliation and contact information), and A/V requirements to Sam Chesters, University of Houston, at [email protected] by May 15, 2020.

SCANDALOUS STATUS QUOS
NATIVE AMERICAN LITERATURE

This panel welcomes submissions on Native American texts showcasing unique native spiritual and cultural landscapes that challenge the status quo, as well as reflections on current trends. Please, send a short abstract (no more than 250 words), brief bio, and A/V requirements to Dr. Maria Orban, Fayetteville State University, at [email protected], by July 24.

THE SOUTH AND SCIENCE FICTION
SOCIETY FOR THE STUDY OF SOUTHERN LITERATURE (SSSL)

The Society for the Study of Southern Literature invites papers on the South and science fiction for a panel at the South Atlantic Modern Language Association’s Annual Conference from November 13-15, 2020 in Jacksonville, FL. Papers may discuss any of the subgenres of science fiction, including alternate history, post-apocalyptic, scifi gothic, traditional, “hard” or “soft” science fiction, scifi horror, etc., and may focus on any form of media as long as the South is a central locale or focus of the work. Please submit to Cameron Lee Winter (he, him, his) at [email protected] an abstract of 200-500 words and a short biography that includes preferred pronouns, educational background, relevant awards or publications, current research interests, and any A/V requirements. The deadline for these submissions is Friday, April 24, 2020.

SOUTHERN GOTHIC SUBVERSION

This interdisciplinary panel invites submissions for papers that examine the subversive aspects of the Southern Gothic genre in literature, film, television, or music.  Creative new readings of traditional Southern Gothic texts from O'Connor, Faulkner, Williams, etc. are welcome. Also encouraged are explorations of contemporary texts such as the HBO series True Detective, fiction from Toni Morrison and Dona Tartt, or music from The Handsome Family and Iron and Wine.

Please submit a 250-word abstract, brief biographical statement (including academic affiliation and contact information), and A/V requirements to Mary McCampbell at [email protected] by August 25, 2020.

SOUTHERN LITERATURE AND SCANDAL 
SOCIETY FOR THE STUDY OF SOUTHERN LITERATURE (SSSL)

The Society for the Study of Southern Literature invites papers on topics relevant to the SAMLA 92 conference theme: Scandal! Literature & Provocation: Breaking Rules, Making Texts. The works explored may be from any “literary” medium including poetry, prose, film, or video games, and explore concepts of scandal, rebellion, resistance, creation, liminality, or precarity relative to the South[s]. We especially welcome papers that focus on the intersections of the South and lines of identity including race, ethnicity, gender, and class. If you have any questions, please contact either Shari Arnold ([email protected]) or Cameron Lee Winter ([email protected]). Please submit abstracts, biographies, and A/V requirements via the following link by May 15, 2020: https://forms.gle/N3NsRas4hgACdZjZA.

STUDIES IN THE WORKS AND LIFE OF TRUMAN CAPOTE
TRUMAN CAPOTE LITERARY SOCIETY

This panel welcomes proposals treating the life and works of Truman Capote. By June 3, please send a 300-word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Dr. Stuart Noel, Georgia State University, at [email protected].

TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD SIXTY YEARS AFTER
RE-INVENTING GREAT BOOKS

Although it has not received the hoopla of its fiftieth, this year marks the sixtieth anniversary of the publication of To Kill a Mockingbird. In the intervening years it has become an icon of American literature, regularly appearing in top ten lists and on high school and university syllabi. Hailed as a groundbreaking work that subtly yet incisively revealed the deep roots of segregation in the South, it is often used to prove that literature can inspire and impel social change. Yet even at its first appearance there were less than enthusiastic appraisals of the book, and these reservations have grown with the years. Some critics have pointed to the novel’s sermonizing, and others have noted the stereotypical portrayal of African Americans and poor rural whites. Perhaps most significantly, the quietist attitude of the hero of the novel, Atticus Finch, has been seen as precisely the sort of passive acceptance of the status quo that made the fight for social justice and civil rights necessary and often extreme in its measures. Malcolm Gladwell called this attitude “Jim Crow liberalism,” and Thomas Mallon claimed teachers love the novel “because it acts on students ‘as a kind of moral Ritalin, an ungainsayable endorser of the obvious.’” This panel welcomes reconsiderations, reviews, reassessments, repositionings, and/or reassertions of the novel’s value and place in our literature. Please send 250-300 word abstracts, a brief biographical notice, and a/v needs by the June 1st deadline to [email protected]

WALKER PERCY (OPEN TOPIC)

Papers for this session may focus on ANY aspect of Walker Percy’s life and/or works, either fiction or non-fiction. Especially welcome are topics relevant to the SAMLA 92 conference theme: Scandal!: Literature and Provocation: Breaking Rules, Making Texts. Percy's “radical anthropology” and his unique semiotic broke rules and provided the basis for new texts in both his specialty areas of literature and philosophy. Please send 300-word abstracts by May 24, 2020, to Dr. Karey Perkins, South Carolina State University, [email protected]. Please also include a brief bio and any A/V requirements in your abstract.

WHAT RULES CAN YOU BREAK AND STILL GET PUBLISHED?

This roundtable welcomes submissions by scholars working on the production of scholarly journals. What rules must one follow when one submits a scholarly article, and what rules may one bend or break? After brief presentations by the panelists, most of the session will be devoted to questions and answers. By July 10, submit an abstract of approx. 100 words, a brief bio, and any A/V requests to Marshall Bruce Gentry, Flannery O'Connor Review, Georgia College, at [email protected].

^ Return to Category List


Asian / Asian American Studies

THE FUTURE OF ASIAN / ASIAN AMERICAN STUDIES
ASIAN / ASIAN AMERICAN STUDIES

This panel welcomes research papers on any aspect of studies in literature, language, rhetoric, and arts within the realm of Asian / Asian American Studies, and aims to take a close look at how these various fields of Asian / Asian American studies serve as platforms for questioning, critiquing, and re-examining past texts and/or issues, as well as further building, forming, and creating new texts and/or new ways of interpretation. Comparative or interdisciplinary studies, multiethnic, transnational, and cross-cultural research related to the SAMLA 92 theme, Scandal! Literature and Provocation: Breaking Rules, Making Texts, are especially welcome. Please submit a 250-300 word abstract/proposal, a brief bio or CV, and any A/V requirements to Shannon I-Hsien Lee, Georgia State University, at [email protected], by May 31, 2020.

PROVOCATIVE AND PROVOKING: READING RACIAL AND CULTURAL TEXTS ACROSS ASIA

This session welcomes papers addressing any aspect of Asian studies—including (but not limited to) literary and digital representations of cultural, artistic, racial, and linguistic diversity.

In the context of globalization, ethnic issues are never far from us: this is especially true in both cultural and political contexts throughout Asia. For instance, Neo-Orientalism exists not only in the tension between the West and the East, but also within Asia itself. In particular, the tension between mainstream ethnicities--and racial minorities--has become a fraught issue, as expressed in multiple media platforms and various performances. And this tension has accordingly become both provocative and controversial.  Even with the best of intentions, the characterization of such minorities can be stereotyped, exoticized, discriminatory—or patronizing.

This session accordingly offers an opportunity to make such global minorities (and the scholarly research about them) more visible. Such cultural and racial minorities exist throughout Asia – including, for example, the Mongolian, Uyghur, Tibetan, and Mi in China; the Ainu and Ryukyuan in Japan; and the many multi-ethnic immigrants in Thailand. Papers for this session might ask, for instance, how public figures associated with a minority group deal with the tension between their ethnic identity and the mainstream culture’s representation of them.  Here, one might also consider how the public images of politicians, educators, and performers evolve (the example of the Inner-Mongolian singer Ayanga comes to mind). In this context, one might ask how such celebrities construct their public personas—on screen, on stage, on social media, in chat rooms, in music videos—and through other platforms of fan culture.  And how do state governments influence the representation of such minorities?

All approaches to cultural and racial diversity are welcome, including critical race theory, discourse analysis, cross-linguistic comparisons, and so on. Please send a 300-500 word abstract together with a bio to [email protected] by Tuesday, July 21.

THUG LIFE IN ANIME: NEGOTIATING GENERATIONAL RESPONSIBILITY IN ADOLESCENTS

Oftentimes, in anime, the younger generation is heavily influenced by the older generation. Focusing on the negative influences, the adult generation passes on mental anxiety, social pressure, and environmental struggle onto the shoulders of society’s children. Alike the meaning of American rapper Tupac Shakur’s prolific tattoo “THUG LIFE,” children in anime are frequently hindered by the adult generation, which leads to an universally suffering society. This roundtable will expound upon the generational responsibilities put on the younger generation. These responsibilities include global warming and ecocriticism, death anxiety, economic burden, social difference, and emotional trauma. These occurrences will be noted within the anime Neon Genesis Evangelion, Psycho-Pass, Avatar: The Last Airbender, Death Note, and JoJo’s Bizarre Adventure.

We invite paper proposals discussing these generational issues as well as other generational responsibilities within anime. Do not feel restrained by the above listed responsibilities nor the anime.

Please send 250-300 word proposals to Zachary Kronforst, University of North Florida, at [email protected] by June 1, 2020.

^ Return to Category List


Caribbean Studies

 “ILLNESS AS METAPHOR” IN HISPANIC CARIBBEAN WRITING / “LA ENFERMEDAD COMO METÁFORA” EN LA ESCRITURA DEL CARIBE HISPÁNICO

In her well-known essay “Illness as Metaphor,” Susan Sontag argues that TB, one of the major pandemics of 19th-20th centuries, was primarily viewed as “intractable and capricious,” and even “mysterious.”  The same could be said about cancer and, most recently, AIDS, or today’s COVID-19. This panel welcomes papers, in Spanish and English, analyzing the intersections between health, society, and culture in the writings of Hispanic Caribbean authors. By June 8th, please submit a 200-300-word abstract and brief bio to Jose Gomariz, Florida State University, at [email protected]

LITERATURE, PROVOCATION, AND "THE REPEATING ISLAND": TRANSGRESSIONS IN CARIBBEAN LITERATURE

This session welcomes submissions that theorize or analyze transgressions in Caribbean literature. Abstracts addressing embodied, cultural, historical, or relational transgressions are welcome, as are abstracts that explore transgression as both provocative and constructive in Caribbean literature. By July 15, please submit an abstract of 250 words and a brief bio to Rebecca Signore, Old Dominion University, at [email protected].

^ Return to Category List


Creative Writing

“BUT YOU'RE NOT SUPPOSED TO DO THAT!”: CREATIVE WRITING CRAFT TALKS ON WHEN TO BREAK THE RULES

When is it best to tell instead of show? What if the best enjambment might actually be on the article instead of a noun or a verb? Why might a short story need to drop conflict altogether? This panel invites creative writing craft essays that consider when it’s not only okay to break certain “rules” of craft but maybe even necessary. In addition to essays that question traditional rules of craft, the panel is also interested in addressing pedagogical practices that challenge or resist conventional workshop settings and seek to build classrooms where students from diverse backgrounds all have a voice.

Panelists will give a reading of their craft essays and then field questions from each other and the audience. Please send a 250-word abstract and a brief bio to James Davis May at [email protected] by June 19, 2020.

COURTING SCANDAL, RISKING TRUTH: CREATIVE WRITERS ON THE PLEASURES AND LIMITS OF SELF-DISCLOSURE

In recognition of the conference theme, this panel welcomes papers from creative writers of any genre who draw upon their own personal histories in their work. While writing about deeply personal subjects can be liberating, autobiographical writers risk scandalizing relatives, students, and colleagues alike. We welcome presentations on a variety of subjects, including but not limited to the ethics of writing about others, dealing with charges of sensationalism, or recovering from a scandal, and gauging when to share a provocative story and when to keep silent.

In addition to presenting a paper, participants will give a short reading from their creative work. Please send abstracts of 250 words, a brief bio, and a 1-2 page excerpt of creative work to Chelsea Rathburn, Assistant Professor of English-Creative Writing at Mercer University, at [email protected] by June 19, 2020.

THE RURAL SPECULATIVE

The rural speculative challenges traditional representations of the agrarian landscape using fantastic, weird, or science fictional elements, while celebrating the richness and complexity of non-urban spaces. This session invites creative submissions that engage with the rural speculative; those incorporating the conference theme of “scandal” are particularly welcome. By June 15, please submit up to six pages of poetry or one prose piece under 1,500 words, a brief bio, and any A/V requests to both Dr. Gregory Ariail and Jessica Fordham Kidd at the University of Alabama ([email protected]; [email protected]).

SCANDAL IN AUTOBIOGRAPHY

Autobiographies establish the author’s own individual voice and the ability of that voice to display a social scandal or provoke a scandal. In so doing, authors aim to understand the social space around them, and in particular, their personal experience to provoke others within their narrative from the 19th to the 21st centuries.

How do we use autobiographical texts to examine the crossroads of public and private spaces? Phillippe Lejeune outlines a pact between writers and their readers, testified by the use of the author’s name as both protagonist and narrator. Autobiography has in this way been for centuries one of the most widespread prolific expressions and can be related to the larger tradition of the genre in terms of self-depiction in literary history. This panel therefore explores the impact of scandal in autobiographies of the nineteenth-twenty-first centuries.  Scandal as a social phenomenon examines speech acts. At times, scandal comes from the outside, in which a writer reflects upon an experience; scandal can also take the form of provocation. We encourage papers from a broad range of disciplines, and possible topics might include: 

  • Scandal in Popular Culture
  • Autobiography in the Romantic Era
  • Politics and Scandal
  • Love, Heartbreak, and Sensual Writing
  • Scandal and Communication Studies
  • Global Female Testimonies 

Please send abstracts of 250 words to Dr. Petra M. Schweitzer ([email protected]) and to Dr. Casey Eriksen ([email protected]) by June 30, 2020.

SCANDALOUS POETS!
SAMLA POETS

This regular poetry session welcomes creative submissions on any aspect of the conference theme: Scandal! Literature and Provocation: Breaking Rules, Making Texts. This session aims to feature all types of poems and poets; poems that break rules or are about people breaking rules are especially welcome! By June 1, 2020, please submit a sample of original poetry that fits the conference theme (3-5 poems, 10 pages max), a brief bio, and any A/V requests to Sara Pirkle, The University of Alabama, at [email protected].

^ Return to Category List


English Studies (UK & Ireland)

AGENT PROVOCATEUR: JAMES BOND AND SCANDAL

From the first publication of Fleming’s James Bond novels in the 1950s, up to the troubled and controversial production of No Time To Die, the 25th Bond film, the persona and milieu of Bond has attracted scandal. Lambasted in 1958 by Paul Johnson for “sex, snobbery, and sadism,” Fleming’s novels attracted still more notoriety when they were adapted into film starting with Dr No in 1962. On the one hand, James Bond has been kept relevant by linking him to contemporary crises and scandals such as international terrorism, cyberhacking, and corporate corruption. On the other, the persistence of Bond’s heavy drinking, womanizing, and violence have themselves been provocative, leading to such dismissals as Bond being a “sexist, misogynist, dinosaur,” a notorious verdict uttered by Judi Dench in Goldeneye. Bond always breaks the rules, and his “licence to kill” also makes him a scandalously violent figure. The theme of this year’s SAMLA conference, Scandal! Literature and Provocation: Breaking Rules, Making Texts, is an ideal opportunity to reflect on ways in which the character and actions of Bond continue to shock, upset and offend—as well as enthrall and entertain—readers and viewers. We invite papers on any aspect of sexual, political, or other “scandal” in Fleming’s novels and/or the Bond films. Please send 300-word paper proposals, brief bios, and A/V requirements to Professor Oliver Buckton at Florida Atlantic University ([email protected]) and Matthew B. Sherman ([email protected]) by August 10, 2020. 

CHRISTOPHER MARLOWE'S PLAYS AND THE POLITICS OF TRANSGRESSION

This panel seeks to explore the ideology of Marlowe's transgressive characters and the end to which they pursue their desires. Please submit abstracts 200-300 words with a short bio, and any A/V requests to W. Reginald Rampone, Jr., at [email protected] by May 10, 2020.

IRISH LITERATURE AND HISTORY: THINK! WRITE! REVOLUTIONIZE!

Using Roland Barthes’s theory of narrative as the foundation, this session will tell the story of Ireland through interactive elements. A short lecture (15 minutes) will set the stage for what was transpiring throughout medieval Ireland. A short video will be juxtaposed with the lecture. Thereafter, Saint Leo students and faculty will unite to provide an interactive workshop in which participants review Irish historical and literary materials. We will engage with rethinking how Irish classical writings are viewed, the stories they tell, and how to teach them in the 21st century classroom. Particular focus will be on teaching strategies for Irish history and literature and how students can become engaged learners and instructors of the material they are learning in the classroom. Throughout the workshop, participants will review the materials and engage with the students and workshop leaders and develop their own stories from the Irish historical and literary documents provided. By September 5, please email submissions to Chantelle MacPhee at [email protected] 

IRISH STUDIES: REBELLION AND RHETORIC

The Irish Studies session invites submissions on any aspect of "Rebellion and Rhetoric."  Papers examining the role rhetoric has played in the history of rebellion in Irish politics and literature are especially invited. Abstracts addressing the conference theme are also welcome. By June 15, 2020, please submit an abstract of no more than 250 words, a brief bio, and any A/V requests to Dr. Rebecca Briley, Midway University, at [email protected].

LAWRENCE, SCANDAL, AND PROVOCATION
ENGLISH V (MODERN BRITISH)
D.H. LAWRENCE SOCIETY OF NORTH AMERICA

The D.H. Lawrence Society of North America solicits proposals relating to the SAMLA 92 conference theme of Scandal! Literature and Provocation: Breaking Rules, Making Texts. Possible topics for a Lawrence panel might be: obscenity, pornography, censorship, tyranny, fascism, feminism, race and racism, dissent and dissidence, antagonism, xenophobia, the people, or popular culture. By August 15, please send an abstract of 200-300 words, a brief bio, and A/V requirements to Adam Parkes, University of Georgia, at [email protected].

“LONDON HAS FALLEN”: TERRORISM AND BRITISH LITERATURE AND POPULAR CULTURE, CA. 1790-2005

This year marks the 15th anniversary of the July 2005 London terrorist attacks (i.e., the “7/07”) that targeted public transportation, the capital city’s deadliest attack since World War II and its first incident of suicide-bombing. With inevitable parallels drawn to “9/11,” the incident (and this year’s anniversary) furnishes the opportunity to focus on London’s long history of actual, planned, and “imagined” terrorist attacks. Interestingly, the notions of “terrorism” and “terrorists” first emerged in Britain through conversations about the Gothic novel and secondhand, written accounts of the French Revolution--meaning that in Britain, terrorism is inextricable from representations of terrorism. As such, for this conference, we are interested in 8-9 page papers that focus on at least one (1) primary text to engage in a larger critical conversation about urban terrorism in Great Britain in/and literature (broadly defined).

Please submit a 300-word proposal by 1 August 2020 to Dr. Jeffrey Edward Jackson, Associate Professor of Nineteenth-Century British Literature in Monmouth University's Department of English, at [email protected].

In your proposal, please provide your paper’s current title, central argument, and approach or methodology as well as a sense of what you are contributing to a “larger conversation” or topic on the broader issue of London-based terrorism in literature and/or popular culture, circa 1790-2005. Papers may engage with but are by no means limited to the following areas of critical conversation:

  • Depictions of London in canonical London-terrorist narratives;
  • Depictions of London in popular London-terrorist narratives;
  • Anglophilia and London-terrorist narratives;
  • Harry Potter after “7/07”;
  • YA London-terrorist novels;
  • “007 after 7/07”;
  • Memorial Culture and London-terrorist narratives;
  • Gothic rhetoric and/or discourse in London-terrorist narratives;
  • Criminality/London “underworld” rhetoric and London terrorism;
  • London-terrorist narratives and fin de sicle literary culture;
  • Late-Victorian culture-texts as terrorist novels (e.g., Dracula, The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, The Importance of Being Earnest, The Picture of Dorian Gray);
  • Highbrow, middlebrow, lowbrow debates in/and the London-terrorist novel;
  • Women in/and British “terrorist” circles, ca. 1880s-1900;
  • Popular, lowbrow, penny-dreadful, etc., “dynamite novels” (ca. 1885-1900);
  • Terrorists as artists, artists as terrorists in London-terrorist narratives and discourses;
  • Popular fiction and London-terrorist narratives;
  • Tourism and London terrorism;
  • “Anarchy in the UK”: Terrorist rhetoric and the British punk scene;
  • 9/11 through British literary eyes;
  • “The Great British novel” after 9/11;
  • “The Great British novel” after 7/07;
  • The Booker Prize after 9/11;
  • The Booker Prize after 7/07;
  • Graphic narratives of London terrorism;
  • The idea of the “English gentleman” and/vs. terrorism;
  • Matthew Arnold’s Culture and Anarchy after 9/11 and/or 7/07;
  • London as hyperreal city/simulacra/”Unreal City” within terrorist discourses;
  • Blowing up Big Ben: The history of an image [this could be done with any other iconic London landscape];
  • Terrorist narratives and London as “New Babylon”;
  • Multicultural London and London-terrorist narratives;
  • The Blitz/Myth of the Blitz after 9/11 and/or 7/07;
  • The Gordon Riots in British literature;
  • Guy Fawkes after terrorism / in the 21st century;
  • British literary depictions of “the terrorist” (or nihilist, anarchist, etc.,);
  • Terrorism as literary form in British terrorist novels;
  • British Muslim identity in literature after 7/07.

MEDIEVAL TEXTS CHALLENGING BOUNDARIES
ENGLISH I (MEDIEVAL)

This traditional session welcomes submissions on any topic associated with Medieval England and its texts (400-1500 CE). This includes texts written in Old English, Middle English, Latin, Gaelic, etc. Abstracts addressing the conference theme of Scandal! Literature and Provocation: Breaking Rules, Making Texts are especially welcome. By June 1, 2020, please submit an abstract of 200-300 words, a brief bio, and any A/V requests to Nathan Fleeson at [email protected].

MILTON AND SCANDAL
MILTON

Milton is surrounded by scandal from religious heresy to political dissent to aesthetic iconoclasm. In Early Modern Studies, contemporary criticism, or the classroom, Milton remains a pointed example of SAMLA’s theme, Scandal! Literature and Provocation: Breaking Rules, Making Texts. In both his prose and poetry, Milton fashions texts by bending and breaking both form and matter across religion, politics, science, and literature. The Milton session invites abstracts on any aspect of Milton Studies, but scandalous and provocative proposal are particularly welcome. Please submit abstracts by May 15, 2020, to D. Geoffrey Emerson at [email protected].

PROVOCATIONS AND PROVOCATEURS OF THE LONG NINETEENTH CENTURY
ENGLISH IV (ROMANTIC & VICTORIAN)

This traditional session welcomes submissions on any aspect of the conference theme. Please note that the "Long Nineteenth Century" encompasses any works published between 1789 and 1914. By May 30, please submit a 500-word abstract and a brief bio to Dr. Anita Turlington, University of North Georgia, at [email protected].

SECRETS AND LIES IN CONRAD
THE JOSEPH CONRAD SOCIETY

From Marlow’s infamous declaration that he cannot “bear a lie” in Heart of Darkness to Verloc’s double identity in The Secret Agent, the implications of lying and deception can be seen across Conrad’s works. This panel seeks papers that address how secrets and lies are employed throughout Conrad’s texts on a public/political, private/personal, and/or aesthetic level. In keeping with SAMLA 92’s theme, panelists are encouraged to consider how deception—its intent, its purpose, and its consequences—can both undermine and empower authority, cultural norms, community, and identity. Please send 250-word abstracts with a brief bio and any A/V requirements to Dr. Reena Thomas at [email protected] by August 16, 2020.

SCOTT'S MILLENNIUM HALL AND BURNEY'S CAMILLA: CRIPPING TWO EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY NOVELS

This special session welcomes submissions that view either Sarah Scott’s 1762 Millenium Hall or Frances Burney’s 1796 Camilla (or both novels) through a disability studies lens. Abstracts addressing the conference theme (Scandal! Literature & Provocation: Breaking Rules, Making Texts) are especially welcome. By July 25, 2020, please submit an abstract of 200 words, a brief bio, and any A/V requests to Dr. Chris Gabbard, University of North Florida, [email protected].

SHAKESPEARE AND SCANDAL

This session seeks to explore Shakespeare's characters who invite and engage in scandal by transgressing social conventions through their actions, words, and beliefs. Please submit a 200-300 word abstract, a short bio, and any A/V requirement to W. Reginald Rampone, Jr., at [email protected] by May 10, 2020.

THE SPECTRAL PRESENCE IN IRISH LITERATURE

This traditional panel welcomes submissions on the topic of ghosts, spirits, spiritualism, mediumship or other spectral presences in Anglo-Irish literature or Irish Anglophone literature. Abstracts addressing the conference theme are especially welcome. By June 15th, please send an abstraction of 250 words, a brief bio, and any A/V requests to Oliver Hennessey, Xavier University of Louisiana, at [email protected].

TEACHING REMOTE TEXTS REMOTELY: CHALLENGES OF AND STRATEGIES FOR TEACHING LITERATURE IN A PANDEMIC WORLD

In spring of 2020, as lockdowns necessitated the closing of face-to-face instruction on college campuses, instructors immediately began experimenting with teaching their content remotely.  The experiment continues into fall 2020, as colleges and universities advise instructors to prepare for a variety of instructional interruptions. This session will explore teaching strategies for teaching “remote” texts.  That is, texts that are at a remove for students because of their place in time, place in the world, or challenging subject matter.  How do we reach students from a distance when the texts are challenging for them even in the most routine of teaching situations?  A range of approaches to the topic is welcome.

By June 15, 2020, please submit an abstract of 250 words, a brief bio, and any A/V requests to Katie Smith at [email protected] and refer to “SAMLA 2020” in the subject heading.

T.S. ELIOT: PROVOCATION, CREATION, AND SCANDAL?
T.S. ELIOT SOCIETY

This special panel sponsored by the International T. S. Eliot Society invites papers on any topic relating Eliot’s life and work. The SAMLA 92 theme Scandal: Literature and Provocation: Breaking Rules, Making Texts invites us to examine in particular Eliot’s work in the context of the relationship between rule-breaking and text-making, as well as (personal or professional) scandal. The recent watershed of previously unpublished material from Eliot—most notably the Complete Prose and the availability of the Emily Hale Letters—offers rich ground for exploring these issues. Though, again, I’d note that we will consider papers on any topic. By June 15, 2020, please submit a 300-word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Craig Woelfel, at Flagler College ([email protected]).

VICTORIAN WOMEN NOVELISTS: NAVIGATING PLACE IN BRITISH SOCIETY

British women novelists of the Victorian era often explored the accepted and shifting concepts of woman’s role at home, in the workplace, and in society as a whole. Charlotte Brontë, George Eliot, and Oliver Schreiner, for example, discuss a woman’s right to education and the careers open to her as well as how she chooses, if she has a choice. This panel will explore these writers’ arguments for women’s equality and examine repercussions deriving from their writing. Panelists might address such questions as how authors expressed their acceptance of or discontent with women’s position in society or whether the conversation changed as the nineteenth century came to an end. Papers should not exceed 15 minutes. Please e-mail a 250-word abstract, CV, and a brief bio to Calabria Turner at [email protected] by June 1, 2020.

^ Return to Category List


Film Studies

THE GENRES OF CELEBRITY SCANDAL

Given the evident command of the celebrity in 20th- and 21st-century media cultures and following modern trends toward trans-medial and inter-generic production, this traditional session calls for papers that explore the relationships between celebrity and generic scandals. How have filmmakers, television writers, tabloid/entertainment journalists, novelists, essayists, biographers, memoirists, and other cultural creators depicted celebrity scandal while pushing the limits of their given genre or medium? While the 20th and 21st centuries are the focus of this call, media and literary scholars of all periods are welcomed to apply. History-bending is happily encouraged alongside genre-bending. Scandals could involve:

  • Addiction/alcoholism
  • Mental illness and “nervous breakdowns”
  • Sexual controversy: sex tapes, infidelity, coming out, consent, rape, assault, doxing, incest, public sex, etc.
  • Censorship and privacy
  • Body image (fatness, thinness)
  • Crime (shoplifting, violence, DUIs)
  • Health spectacles: disease, cancer, HIV/AIDS, etc.
  • Slander
  • Cults

Please send a 300-word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Blake Beaver at [email protected] by June 1, 2020. 

^ Return to Category List


French Studies

BREAKING BOUNDARIES: TEACHING DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION IN THE FRENCH CLASSROOM
WOMEN IN FRENCH

This panel (or potentially roundtable) seeks contributions that will engage with questions of teaching inclusion through breaking boundaries that limit our students. Presenters may suggest how to make the French Studies classroom a welcoming, inclusive, and productive learning environment. We will propose ways an educator can help increase diversity, inclusivity, tolerance, quality, and success in the French and Francophone classroom. Presentations addressing underrepresented populations, rethinking the terms related to diversity, identity, and being, as well ways to recognize systemic racism, sexism, ableism and unconscious bias are welcome. How can our teaching adapt to diverse student needs but also incorporate their realities as an invaluable resource of knowledge and understanding? How can we include cultural content which is interpretable or relatable to what students see and experience as a means to getting them to engage productively, perhaps even creatively, in a diverse world? Please send 250-word proposals to E. Nicole Meyer ([email protected]) by May 15, 2020 along with presenter’s academic affiliation, contact information, and A/V requirements.

FRENCH AND FRANCOPHONE WOMEN WRITERS WHO BREAK THE RULES AND CHANGE THE WORLD
WOMEN IN FRENCH

This panel welcomes papers focused on explorations of rule-breaking in French and Francophone women’s writing, film, and other art forms. How do these women initiate and navigate change, shift social order, and contest inequities? Examinations of the liminal spaces between tradition and new order and the ways in which these texts challenge limitations of nationality, class, race, sex, and language are particularly welcome. Papers may be in French or English and may not exceed 20 minutes. Please send a 250-word abstract, brief bio and A/V requests to Susan Crampton-Frenchik, [email protected], by July 15, 2020.

MAKING ART, BREAKING RULES: GENDER-BENDING, "GENRE-BENDING," BY FRENCH AND FRANCOPHONE WOMEN WRITERS
WOMEN IN FRENCH

In French and Francophone societies, where men have historically dominated the arts, a woman daring to assert her own voice is already in itself an act of rebellion. On the one hand, by entering the literary and artistic landscape, women writers and artists transgress society’s expectations of their roles in the domestic sphere as only mothers, wives, and obedient daughters. On the other hand, by taking up the pen, women directly challenge artistic traditions dominated by men, or enter into forbidden territories. This panel will examine how French and Francophone women authors play with gender-bending and “genre-bending” in their works, in their lives, and in their critique of society and the artistic traditions they choose to write in or write back at. Among the questions one may ask are: How do women creators confront the “scandal” of their role as artists? How do they negotiate scandal and censorship? How do they bend or break the rules of the genres they take on? How do politics inform and influence their works and their identities as women authors? Proposals on French and Francophone literatures, films, and other art forms are welcome. Papers may be in English or French. Please send 250-word proposals in English or French to Cathy Leung ([email protected]) by July 15, 2020, along with presenter’s academic affiliation, contact information, and A/V requirements.

LA RUPTURE: TEXTE, CONTEXTE ET PRÉTEXTE
FRENCH III (NINETEENTH AND TWENTIETH CENTURIES)

Une vie de boy de Ferdinand Oyono se présente comme un coup de massue dans le discours du politiquement correcte l’égard de l’ex-puissance coloniale française. En effet, Oyono dans son roman soulève les questions qui fâchent, qui dérangent, et qui bousculent les ordres dans les rapports entre dominants et dominés. Dans ce panel, nous souhaiterions revisiter les textes coloniaux dans les contextes politiques et religieux ayant servi de prétexte pour promouvoir toutes les formes d’injustice, de brimade et d’exploitation à l’encontre des Africains. Les communications qui abordent les thèmes de l’identité, de la religion, de la violence et de l’exploitation sexuelle en étroite relation avec la colonisation sont les bienvenues. Veuillez envoyer au plus tard le 15 Mai, votre résumé de 250 mots à Karim Simpore au [email protected].

SCANDALOUS SILENCE: RECOVERING THE REBELLIOUS VOICES OF GISÈLE PINEAU’S OEUVRE
WOMEN IN FRENCH

For nearly three decades, Gisèle Pineau’s writing project has spanned genres, using children’s stories, hybrid visual and narrative texts, fiction, and autofiction to address longstanding questions about Antillean women’s subjectivity, memory, racism in contemporary France, and the protean ramifications of the history of slavery. Despite the sustained and valuable scholarly interest in Pineau’s work, many of her texts have received surprisingly little critical attention. Indeed, Pineau has penned more than a dozen full-length works since the publication of her famous 1996 auto-fictional L'exil selon Julia; yet, these texts have not garnered the scholarship they warrant. This panel therefore seeks to foreground lesser-known works by Pineau in the aim of generating a more comprehensive understanding of the richness of her writing career and the breadth of her inquiry into enduring issues of gender, race, history, and Antillean identity. Revised and expanded conference proceedings will be considered for a potential edited volume on Pineau. Please send 250-300 word abstracts in English or French to Lisa Connell and Delphine Gras at [email protected] and [email protected] by July 15, 2020.

SEXUALITY AND SCANDAL: REPRESENTATIONS OF NONNORMATIVE SEXUALITIES IN FRENCH AND FRANCOPHONE LITERATURE

This panel seeks presentations on “scandalous” sexualities in French and Francophone literature. Abdellah Taïa, in his 2009 open letter to his family, acknowledges his scandalous nature, but insists that he must continue to write: “Je suis dans […] une certaine responsabilité vis-à-vis de moi-même et vis-à-vis de la société d’où je viens.” Édouard Louis, in his semi-autobiographical En finir avec Eddy Bellegueule (2014), explains that he learned early on that his sexuality was public knowledge even when he tried to hide it: “Ils m’ont posé cette question que je me suis répétée ensuite, inlassablement, des mois, des années, C’est toi le pédé?” This panel welcomes papers that examine the scandalous, shocking, disgraceful, shameful, and unseemly in French and Francophone narratives about or by authors of nonnormative sexualities. What are the social, corporeal, and textual consequences of being deemed “scandalous”? How do these authors challenge the scandals with which they are confronted, and how do they orchestrate scandals of their own? What are the political and social effects of defending one’s scandalous nature? Please send abstracts of 200-300 words and a one-paragraph academic bio to Ryan Schroth at [email protected] by June 15, 2020.

WOMEN, LIFE WRITING, AND SCANDALS OF SELF-REVELATION
WOMEN IN FRENCH

As life writing exposes purported truths about personal experience and identity, self-revelations in these accounts position these texts as potential objects of controversy as authors test the limits of telling all. Many authors have turned to life-writing practices to speak about intimate loss, family secrets, stolen childhoods, and physical, psychological, or historical trauma. In this way, autobiography, autofiction, and memoir, remain potentially perilous terrains especially regarding the implications of others on which such self-accounts unavoidably depend. This panel seeks to explore the scandals behind or beyond such self-revelation. How has scandal served as impetus for textual creation? In what ways has the publication of “scandalous” texts implicated others whether in accusation, in solidarity, or by engaging in broader controversies or social discontent? How have such texts responded to scandal? What role do legal proceedings play in (self)censoring self-accounts? Proposals on examples of women engaged with or implicated in scandalous self-revelations in literature, film, theatre, and other modes of representation from all time periods and all areas of Francophone literature are welcome. Please send 250-word proposals in English or French along with presenter’s name, academic affiliation, and email to Adrienne Angelo ([email protected]) by July 15, 2020.

^ Return to Category List


Gender & Sexuality Studies

EXPLORING PROVOCATION AND SCANDAL IN GENDERED TEXTS

Media globalization has transformed the study of Gender Identities and Gender Politics over the past few decades.  Such globalization has given rise not only to new research but also to new media forms that explore such Gender Identities.  As a result, many gender identities are now more widely visible than they were a decade ago—through both representation in texts and actual, real-life encounters.

Indeed, even fictional narratives—such as Slash Fan-Fiction—have increased such visibility and representation.  At the same time, mainstream cultures often regard such representations (and research) as provocative and/or scandalous.

This SAMLA session accordingly welcomes papers on any aspect of gender diversity and identity (including, for example, perspectives from queer studies, non-binary characterization, transgender genres, and so on).  In this context, we also invite discussion of various media forms—including literature, cinema, television, news, and websites—that tend to explore such identities today. Similarly, we also welcome papers discussing various forms of gendered relationships (including, for instance, gender-queer, top/bottom roles, polyamory depictions, genderbending romance/porno, Alpha/Beta/Omega kink tropes, harem tropes – and inter-ethnic romance).  Finally, in the context of genre, we might also ask how such relationships, archetypes, and media forms reinterpret classical genres of fiction, poetry, or drama.  All approaches are welcome, including (but not limit to) literary theory, linguistic studies, discourse analysis, cross-cultural studies, and visual analysis. Please send a 300-500 word abstract together with a bio to [email protected] by Tuesday, July 21.

FEMINISM AND SELF-CARE
FEMINIST LITERATURE AND THEORY

In her article, “Audre Lorde Thought of Self-Care as an ‘Act of Political Warfare,’” author and journalist Sarah Mirk writes, “Self-care can be such a buzzword these days, but what’s often not discussed are the race, gender, and class dynamics behind the concept.” This panel seeks proposals that examine self-care and intersectional feminism. How has the public discourse surrounding self-care changed since Audre Lorde wrote in A Burst of Light that “caring for myself is not self-indulgence, it is self-preservation, and that is an act of political warfare”? This panel welcomes submissions from a range of perspectives, including proposals that focus on depictions of self-care in popular culture and literature, in politics, and in the context of motherhood and social justice movements. Proposals for creative works that address this topic and proposals focused on pedagogy are also welcome. Please submit an abstract of no longer than 250 words, A/V requirements, and a brief bio by June 1, 2020, to Laura Beasley at [email protected].

INTERROGATING QUEER REBELLIOUSNESS: WHO, WHAT, WHERE, WHEN, WHY, AND HOW?
QUEER STUDIES

This year's SAMLA theme, Scandal! Literature and Provocation: Breaking Rules, Making Texts, asks us to consider how cultural texts challenge the establishment. From Aristophanes’s inclusive view of same-sex attraction in Plato's Symposium to the seventeenth-century memoirs of the transgender Spanish convent girlcum-conquistador Catalina de Erauso and the coming out narrative of the 2018 film Love, Simon, discussions about queer identities have long been provocative. This year’s Queer Studies panel(s) welcome(s) submissions on research projects that explore how and why queer identities are seen as radical, rebellious, and revolutionary. How do queer characters in literature, film, and video games serve as a lifeline for readers, viewers, and gamers? How does queerness threaten the capitalist elite and reproductive futurity? Why are discussions of queer identity censored by schools and public libraries? How is the public realm threatened by the inclusion of queer individuals and groups? How does heterosexual identity fit into the queer spectrum? What language do historians, teachers, and governments use to discuss the queer identity of historic figures such as President James Buchanan, Walt Whitman, Willa Cather, Langston Hughes, Bayard Rustin, Sylvia Rivera, etc. in biographies, textbooks, lesson plans, websites, and signage at libraries, museum, historic sites, and public monuments? The Queer Studies group at SAMLA employs the term “queer” as an inclusive noun, adjective, and verb that highlights intersections between sexuality, gender, race, religion, ethnicity, education, economic background, political affiliation, and temporal and spatial realities. Please send an abstract 200-300 words in length along with a one-paragraph academic bio and A/V requests to [email protected] by June 15.

^ Return to Category List


German Studies

EXPANDING THE TEACHING TOOLBOX IN THE GERMAN LANGUAGE & CULTURE CLASSROOM
GERMAN III (1933-PRESENT)

This session welcomes submissions on any aspect of teaching German language and culture at the university level. In particular, we welcome presentations that address classroom topics and tools as well as implementation strategies that go beyond traditional approaches. By June 15, 2020, please submit an abstract of 200-350 words, a brief bio, and any A/V requests to Dr. Margit Grieb, University of South Florida, at grie[email protected] .

^ Return to Category List


Hispanic Studies

BREAKING ESTABLISHED BOUNDARIES THROUGH THE LATIN AMERICAN TESTIMONIO
SPANISH-AMERICAN LITERATURE OF THE TWENTIETH AND TWENTY-FIRST CENTURIES

This session welcomes submissions in Spanish or English that study the role of the Latin American testimonio in restructuring our world through questioning boundaries of all types (geographic, political, gendered, existential, etc.). By August 15, please submit a 200-word abstract, a brief bio, and any A/V requests to Kerri A. Muñoz, Auburn University, at [email protected].

BREAKING RULES: RE-THINKING EARLY MODERN WOMEN'S CULTURAL PRODUCTION IN THE HISPANIC WORLD
GRUPO DE ESTUDIOS SOBRE LA MUJER EN ESPAÑA Y LAS AMÉRICAS

Early modern women’s writing and cultural production have long been seen as exceptional, particularly in the Hispanic and Hispanic American canons. Early scholarship largely focused on women’s publications in genres that privileged male writers, like poetry and the comedia. Some researchers interpreted these feminine interventions as “monstrous,” or “varonil” and often analyzed them in relation to masculine cultural production. The resultant paradigms marginalized less prominent women’s voices—particularly those whose echoes are more difficult to trace in the written archive. Additionally, prior approaches struggled to value the autonomous artistic space that women created, either independently of or in harmony with their male counterparts.

In response, scholars endeavor to trace early women’s artistic and intellectual contributions in cultural spheres that have received less attention, including: cloistered women’s writing, epistolarity, feminine participation in the visual and musical arts, patronage, education, and more. These efforts show how women’s artistic and scholarly production “developed … [its] own parallel history, at times resisting and other times emulating men’s literary models,” as Nieves Baranda and Anne Cruz remark in the introduction to the Routledge Research Companion to Early Modern Spanish Women Writers (2). Like the articles in Baranda and Cruz’s volume illustrate, women were far from silent participants in the early modern Hispanic world. Indeed, expanded methodologies in early modern literary, historical, and cultural studies have paved the way for today’s scholars to re-examine women’s cultural production as a thriving artistic sphere in which many participated.

Keeping with trends in the field as well as the conference theme “Breaking Rules, Making Texts,” this panel seeks to interrogate the construction of early modern women intellectuals as exceptional in the transatlantic Hispanic world. We especially welcome papers that examine previously understudied women writers and artists; shed new light on feminine participation in scholarly spheres through reading, writing, patronage and more; or challenge the exceptionalism of well-known figures like Ana Caro, Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz and María de Zayas. 

Submit a 250-word abstract, brief bio and A/V needs to Sarah Finley ([email protected]) by August 14, 2020. All participants must be current members of GEMELA. Renew your membership here.

CREATING ACTS OF TRANSGRESSION

This session welcomes submissions in Spanish or English that study the role of drama and/or performance practice in education. Papers may explore the use of drama in second language learning or in the literature classroom as a way to challenge societal norms and constructs to question boundaries and to experience the change that brings creativity.

Please submit a 200-word abstract and a brief bio and any A/V requirements in your abstract at Dr. Nuria Ibáñez at [email protected].

CREATING TEXTS, BREAKING THE RULES: GALDOSIAN NARRATIVES

On this, the year when we commemorate the 100th anniversary of the death of Benito Pérez Galdós, we welcome proposals that explores scenarios where the author’s creativity may be perceived as breaking the rules. This panel seeks works that examine the novel of the Serie contemporánea whose protagonists are seen as rebellious in nineteenth century society. Proposals that address any cultural aspect (historical, political, religious, economic, etc.) are welcome. By June 1, please send an abstract of 200-300 words, a brief bio, and A/V requirements to Patricia Orozco, University of Mary Washington, at [email protected].

LA ESCANDALOSA VIGENCIA DE LOS RECUERDS DEL PORVENIR
SPANISH-AMERICAN LITERATURE OF THE TWENTIETH AND TWENTY-FIRST CENTURIES

This panel session welcomes submissions (in Spanish or English) on the scandalously current relevance of the much-honored Mexican author Elena Garro's classic novel Los recuerdos del porvenir. Abstracts addressing the conference theme are especially welcome. By June 19, please submit an abstract of 400 words, a brief bio, and any A/V requests to Gregory Helmick, University of North Florida, at [email protected].

FROM IDEALISM TO SCANDALOUS SCOUNDRELS 
SPANISH I (PENINSULAR: RENAISSANCE TO 1700)

This session welcomes submissions on any aspect of Spanish Peninsular literature from the Renaissance to 1700. Abstracts referencing the conference theme, Scandal! Literature and Provocation: Breaking Rules, Making Texts, are especially welcome, given the abundance of scandalous texts written during the Golden Age of Spanish literature. Please send an abstract of 250 words to Dr. Charmaine McMahon, Chair of the Spanish I Peninsular: Renaissance to 1700 session, at [email protected] by September 6th, 2020.

INNOVATIVE APPROACHES TO TEACHING LATIN AMERICAN LITERATURE AND CULTURE
SPANISH-AMERICAN LITERATURE OF THE TWENTIETH AND TWENTY-FIRST CENTURIES

This panel welcomes submissions on any aspect of innovative approaches to teaching Latin American Literature and Culture, including, but not limited to:

  • Interdisciplinary Approaches (climate change, politics, economics, etc.)
  • Digital Humanities
  • Contractual Assessments
  • Portfolios and/or creative writing assignments
  • New engagements with the canon

Abstracts addressing the conference theme are especially welcome. By June 1, 2020, please submit an abstract of 250 words, a brief bio, and any A/V requests to Dr. Micah McKay, University of Alabama, [email protected] & Dr. Nora Benedict, University of Georgia, [email protected].

LATINA/O CULTURAL PRODUCTIONS AS PROVOCATION: BREAKING RULES, MAKING TEXTS

The cultural production of US Latina/os, as any other so-called minority discourse, can be analyzed as defiant voices that aim to provoke dialogue with the hegemonic discourse and the mainstream culture. As such, these discourses can be more or less combative in their struggle to break and resist the rules imposed by the status quo. This panel welcomes submissions in English or Spanish on any aspect of Latina/o cultural products (literature, fashion, film, visual arts, etc.) that aim to contest hegemony, including but not limited to:

  • Building a minority consciousness
  • Subverting the status quo with regards to gender, sexuality, socioeconomic status
  • Providing a subaltern perspective

Abstracts addressing the conference theme are especially welcome. By June 10, please submit an abstract of 200-250 words, a brief bio, and any A/V requests to Ignacio Rodeño, The University of Alabama, at [email protected].

MEXICAN LITERATURE, CULTURE, AND FILM
MEXICAN LITERATURE AND CULTURE

You are invited to present an aspect of Mexican literature, film and culture; for example, you can compare and contrast a specific literary work, which has been taken to cinema. You can also choose a Mexican film and make a presentation on its importance on various aspects of Spanish language, literature, history and culture. By May 15, please send a 200 word-abstract to Jose A. Cortes-Caballero, Georgia State University–Perimeter College, at [email protected].

REPRESENTATIONS OF EXTRACTIVIST INDUSTRIES IN LATIN AMERICA
SPANISH-AMERICAN LITERATURE OF THE TWENTIETH AND TWENTY-FIRST CENTURIES

One of the defining characteristics of industry and the formation of culture in Latin America is its reliance on extractivist and stockbreeding practices for subsistence--one can count, for example, agricultural practices in fruit plantations in the Caribbean, rubber exploitation in the Amazon, mining industries in the Andean regions and Mesoamerica, or cattle ranching in Argentina and Brazil. This creates an undeniable relationship between the land, space, and how people imagine and represent themselves in relation to the place they occupy. At the same time, it generates dynamics where certain groups can be accepted or rejected depending on their national origin, race, class, gender, sexual orientation, or even religion. This panel aims to explore the intersection of social and cultural practices in these spaces in literature, film, and other texts in different media, as well as the relationship these spaces create with national capitals and other regions, countries, or cultures. Some questions that the papers in this panel aim to answer are: How is the land portrayed in relation to the people who inhabit it and the industry that takes place in it? How does the industry help create a specific culture? What are the defining characteristics of these cultures related to regional, national, or industrial imaginaries? What kind of conflicting versions or visions appear from the way in which these industries are represented in literary texts and other media? Please submit 150 to 250-word paper proposals--including media requests--and a short bio by September 7, 2020, to Cristobal Cardemil-Krause (West Chester University) at [email protected].

SETTING THE SKANDALON IN THE FIRST PHASE OF THE SPANISH-LANGUAGE DIGITAL JOURNAL REVISTA ARENALES

This round table welcomes submissions on any aspect of developing a digital Spanish-language literary journal. Abstracts addressing the conference theme are especially welcome. By June 19, please submit an abstract of 400 words, a brief bio, and any A/V requests to Gregory Helmick and Amarillys Sanchez, University of North Florida, at [email protected] or [email protected]

SCANDAL!! BREAKING RULES, MAKING TEXTS, BREAKING RULES, BEING CREATIVE

This session is open to papers in English and/or Spanish that deal with the process of creation as the result of a scandal, the breaking of a rule, or any drastic change that brings forward creativity. Please contact Ruth Sanchez Imizco at [email protected] with submissions by June 30, 2020. 

SPANISH II, PENINSULAR LITERATURE, 1700 TO PRESENT: QUADRUPLE SESSION (A, B, C, & D)
SPANISH II (PENINSULAR: 1700 TO PRESENT)

Abstracts for sessions A, B, and C will reflect any theme related to Peninsular Literature from 1700 to the present. It is expected that there will be a wide range of topics from different periods. In keeping with the 2020 conference theme, abstracts for session D should focus on Scandal! Literature and Provocation: Breaking Rules, Making Texts. Please bear in mind the following: This is a quadruple session with a maximum of three participants per session. It also involves SAMLA business, such as elections. Papers should not exceed twenty minutes. Potential presenters are urged to send 250-word abstracts, short academic bios (approximately 100 words), and contact information as early as possible, by email attachment only, in one single Word document please. Presenters may read only one paper at the convention and must be SAMLA members by the time of confirmation to attend the convention. Papers must be unpublished and not previously presented at a professional meeting. Deadline for abstracts is May 22, 2020. Please send materials via e-mail to Dr. F. Javier Fernández Urenda, Chair of Spanish II (Peninsular: 1700 to Present), at [email protected].

THEMES OF BOUNDARIES, RULES, LIMITS, AND CULTURAL REGULATIONS IN THE WORKS OF MIGUEL DE CERVANTES
CERVANTES SOCIETY OF AMERICA

Cervantes lived within a cultural environment characterized by social, political, and religious norms that were regularly respected, challenged, or transgressed throughout Spanish early modernity. His works often represented a commentary on the motivations, enforcement, and consequences of these societal rules and have inspired a wide variety of research on his approximations to themes like power, identity, culture, class, race, and other elements regulated in Golden Age Spain. Thanks to his writing about these boundaries during his lifetime, Cervantes’s works present themes that transcend chronologies and are as resonant today as they were at their conception.

In the face of regulatory authorities such as the Inquisition, societal rules governed by the code of honor, and a class hierarchy that rigidly demarcated nobility from the rest of the population, how did Cervantes engage with the religious, social, and political boundaries of seventeenth-century Spanish society? How did he utilize, manipulate, hide, or define societal rules to acknowledge, respect, and/or test the resilience of these limits? How do his works represent a commentary, defense, or critique as a recognition of, compliance with, or as a provocation of seventeenth-century Spain’s regulatory frameworks?

The Cervantes Society of America at SAMLA 92 welcomes papers that examine ways in which Miguel de Cervantes’s works engage with the religious, social, and political boundaries of seventeenth-century Spanish society by pushing cultural norms to their limits. Please submit by e-mail a 200-word abstract, brief bio, one-page CV, and A/V requirements by July 15to the chair, Daniel Holcombe ([email protected]) and to the secretary, Xabier Granja ([email protected]).

TRANSATLANTIC, TRANSCULTURAL, AND TRANSNATIONAL DIALOGUES ON IDENTITY, CULTURE, AND MIGRATION IN LATIN AMERICAN AND IBERIAN CULTURES

This session welcomes submissions on any aspect of transatlantic, transcultural, and transnational dialogues on identity, culture, and migration in Latin America, the Hispanic Caribbean, and Spain through a literary or cultural studies analysis. The purpose of this panel is to illustrate the shared diasporic experience of migrants across the Atlantic through a transatlantic, transcultural, and transnational lens. By May 10, please submit an abstract of 250 words, a brief bio, and any A/V requests to Sonja Stephenson Watson, University of Texas at Arlington at [email protected].

TRANSGRESSION AND ADAPTATION IN HISPANIC CULTURES

This panel will explore the many forms of adaptation in Hispanic cultures, offering a comparative dialogue on the multiform products and processes of adaptation within Spain and Spanish America. We encourage contributors to employ interdisciplinary tools and theoretical perspectives that open new conversations on the porousness of cultural edges and the artifacts that sustain and deny it. We welcome paper proposals on topics including studies of texts, genres, contact zones, and analyses of adaptation itself, among others. By July 26, please send a 250-word paper abstract, a one-page CV and A/V requests to Elisabeth Austin ([email protected]) and Elena Lahr-Vivaz ([email protected]).

TRANSGRESSION IN LATIN AMERICAN LITERATURE
SPANISH-AMERICAN LITERATURE OF THE TWENTIETH AND TWENTY-FIRST CENTURIES

This panel welcomes submissions on any aspect of transgression as it relates to Latin American literature, including, but not limited to:

  • Subversion of (Literary and/or Social) Norms
  • Piracy and (Digital) Circulation
  • Copyright and Legal Issues

Abstracts addressing the conference theme are especially welcome. By June 1, 2020, please submit an abstract of 250 words, a brief bio, and any A/V requests to Dr. Micah McKay, University of Alabama, [email protected] & Dr. Nora Benedict, University of Georgia, [email protected].

^ Return to Category List


Interdisciplinary Studies

ASSOCIATION OF ADAPTATION STUDIES
ASSOCIATION OF ADAPTATION STUDIES

This year's SAMLA theme, Scandal! Literature and Provocation: Breaking Rules, Making Texts, aligns particularly well with adaptation studies. As sources and sites of scandal and provocation, adapters, adapting, and adaptations break and (re)make rules, as they push, cross, install, and reimagine boundaries between texts, media, and reception. The Association of Adaptation Studies invites proposals for papers that engage with the conference theme directly, or with any aspect of adaptation studies. By August 15, 2020, please submit an abstract of 300 words to Kate Newell at [email protected]. Please also include a brief bio and any A/V requirements.

CAN SCANDAL PROMOTE SOCIETAL CHANGE? PERSPECTIVES IN FICTION, FILM, AND POPULAR CULTURE

From newspaper headlines to the office to sports to politics to the entertainment industry, scandal seems an almost natural, expected, and even anticipated part of our world. For those involved, it can result in shame, loss of employment, social ostracism, anxiety, and punishment. For observers, it can provide distractions from personal woes, a sense of justice, of an example of hubristic behavior finally resulting in downfall. But, can scandal also be a force for social justice? Political reform? Personal Redemption? This session will explore how scandal is depicted in literature, film, and popular culture and how it is used as a vehicle to promote personal or societal change and personal betterment. This session welcomes submission on any aspect of scandal as a force for social, political, or personal reform. Please submit an abstract of 250-300 words, a brief bio, and any A/V requirements by May 30, 2020, to Sean Dugan, Mercy College, at [email protected].

COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT IN THE HUMANITIES

This roundtable will feature 5-minute papers/presentations that explore best practices for including community engagement within Humanities courses. Experiments with critical pedagogies and research programs, as well as creative and thoughtful engagements with regional and local communities, are especially welcome. The roundtable format features brief formal or informal presentations, leaving plenty of time for interaction and discussion between, and among, participants and audience members. By July 26, please send a 200-word presentation abstract, a 1-page CV and A/V requests to Elisabeth Austin ([email protected]).

CONSPIRACIES AND THE PARANOID STYLE

Contemporary society is rife with conspiracy theories and paranoia. In times of epistemic crisis, we search for what is rational among the ruins of the uncanny and absurd. The paranoid style, a phrase coined by historian Richard Hofstadter to describe a facet of American politics, originated from the 18th-century political ideology of republicanism, which viewed liberty as always on the defense. According to Hofstadter, the paranoid style expresses itself in three ways: heated exaggeration, suspiciousness, and conspiratorial fantasy. He believed what paranoid movements had in common was a sense of dispossession; these movements were composed of people who felt excluded from the mainstream.

But how uniquely American, and how uniquely modern is this style? From the paranoia of both regimes and people living under their oppression in the Eastern Bloc; to the barely-literate hoax The Protocols of the Elders of Zion; even to medieval justifications for pogroms, assassinations, and state-sponsored executions, paranoia has long been a feature of political and cultural “style.”

This session invites submissions for twenty-minute, scholarly presentations on the topics of paranoia, conspiracies, and the rhetoric thereof to offer interpretations of what renders regimes and peoples susceptible to conspiracy theories regardless of—and even in spite of—their implausibility. What do these accounts say about the fragile connections we have to reality and the seismic shifts in worldly perceptions? Possible topics may include (but are not limited to) themes of

  • Regimes and paranoia
  • Paranoid citizens/subjects
  • Genealogies and/or geographies of paranoia and conspiracy-mongering
  • Paranoia as historical pattern

By June 15, 2020, please email abstracts to Josh Beall at [email protected].

CREATING THE NEW UNIVERSITY PRESS
UNIVERSITY PRESS PUBLISHING

This session welcomes submissions on "Creating the New University Press." It asks how innovation in scholarly publishing comes about, given the speed of technological change and the quickly modified forms by which knowledge is generated and presents itself. Many, if not all, existing publishers and publications continue to adhere almost exclusively to the book or journal, forms whose time frames for acquisition, marketing, and production are tied to anachronistic and often oppressive communication technologies that perpetuate assumptions about what content is and how it is generated. But how do we collectively unpack how assumptions about what scholarship is determine what scholarship does or the forms it takes? In particular, how can we transform new thinking about scholarship to effect alternative publication formats, which may or may not avail themselves of the digital? This call for papers asks for work that describes and contextualizes particular difficulties or impasses presented by the scholarly publication ecosystem. We are also requesting work that contemplates and/or enacts solutions that work to generate unalloyed (not to say utopian) manifestations of research. By April 15, 2020, please submit an abstract of 250-500 words, a brief bio, and any A/V requests to Tim Roberts, Director, NP: New Press, [email protected].

DIASPORAS, MULTICULTURAL IDENTITY, AND THE BILDUNGSROMAN

In its simplest terms, the Bildungsroman is defined as the coming-of-age novel. This genre traditionally tells the story of a protagonist who does not identify within the mainstream power structure of the society that they inhabit and concludes upon the assimilation to the aforementioned system of power. Diasporas and multicultural identity, however, have the tendency to problematize this genre, given that marginalized characters are subject to more than one mainstream. This panel will explore the coming-of-age processes of characters with a multicultural experience such as a diaspora and the ways in which they define themselves amid the power structures that marginalize them. We invite submissions in Spanish, French, and English. By September 6, 2020, please send a 250-word abstract, brief bio, and any A/V requirements to Forrest Blackbourn, Dalton State College, at [email protected].

EVOLUTIONARY AND COGNITIVE APPROACHES TO LITERATURE: NEW DEVELOPMENTS IN INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDY

During the past quarter-century an explosion of new knowledge in evolutionary psychology and cognitive science has transformed our understanding of human nature, reshaping theory and research in numerous academic disciplines. A major purpose of this regular SAMLA session is to provide a forum for the presentation and exchange of ideas flowing from this emergent body of knowledge, as it bears upon the interpretation of literature. Proposals are invited for papers that explore literary texts (of any genre, nationality, or historical period) from a well-defined evolutionary or cognitive perspective, such as the following:

  • Exploration of evolutionary concepts, including evolved adaptations, in literary texts, e.g., kin selection, parental investment, sibling rivalry, inter- and intra-sexual competition, reciprocal altruism, sexual selection.
  • Investigations of inter-relationships between literary art and the human mind, e.g., Machiavellian intelligence, strategic self-deception, theory of mind, personal narrative, status, reputation.
  • Theoretical approaches, e.g., the adaptive function of storytelling.
  • Evolutionary ecology, e.g., inter-relationships between humans and their physical environments, including biophilia and biophobia.

Proposals from scholars in the Humanities, sciences, and social sciences are welcome. Send proposals (200-250 words) and condensed CV by May 25 to Session Chair Jeff Turpin ([email protected]) and to Session Secretary Judith Saunders ([email protected]).

FASHION, DRESS, AND STYLE AS PROVOCATION

Engaging with the 2020 SAMLA conference themes of scandal and provocation, this panel explores the ability of fashion, dress, and style to draw attention, provoke, and, perhaps, to scandalize. Papers on any aspect of the relationship of fashion to publicity, celebrity, infamy, and/or scandal during the Victorian, Modern, or contemporary eras are welcome. We seek papers on both textual and graphic representations of fashion, and we encourage submissions that examine sartorial themes in literature, theater, art, film, photography, design, periodicals, digital media, and other aesthetic modes of expression. Topics that might be considered include:

  • Individual verses collective forms of fashionable provocation
  • Scandals in the fashion industry, both recent and historic
  • Dressing for “shock” value and/vs. the (mis)interpretation of dress as purposefully provocative
  • Fashion provocations intersecting with gender, race, and social class
  • Failed fashion rebellions, shocking styles appropriated by the dominant discourse, or unintended consequences of sartorial scandal
  • Breaking or making connections between text, context, texture, and textile. How and why do fashion, dress, and style draw attention, provoke, and scandalize?

By July 3, 2020, please send abstracts of 250-500 words along with AV requests and short bio to both Loretta Clayton, Middle Georgia State University, at [email protected] and Marylaura Papalas, East Carolina University, at [email protected].

THE HOLOCAUST IN LITERATURE AND FILM
THE HOLOCAUST IN LITERATURE AND FILM

This panel invites papers on representations of the Holocaust in texts or films. Paper proposals addressing the SAMLA 92 theme are especially welcome. By June 2, please submit an abstract of approximately 250 words, a brief bio, and A/V requirements to Mike Rice, MTSU, at [email protected].

ILLUSTRATING SCANDAL IN THE LONG EIGHTEENTH CENTURY

Whether operating alone or in tandem with text, images frequently provoke visceral responses. Political satires and social critiques, literary and para-literary illustrations have the power to reflect and sometimes perpetuate scandals from contemporary culture. This traditional session welcomes submissions on any aspect of illustrating or visualizing scandal in the long eighteenth century with particular interest to text-and-image interactions. Abstracts addressing interdisciplinary perspectives and/or multi-national traditions are especially welcome. By September 5th, please submit an abstract of no more than 250 words, a brief bio, and any scheduling/technology requests to Leigh G. Dillard, University of North Georgia, at [email protected].

INTERDISCIPLINARY INTERPRETATIONS AND APPLICATIONS OF FOUCAULT

This panel welcomes submissions on any interdisciplinary application and/or interpretation of theories and analyses from Foucault regarding power, exclusion, normality, psychiatry and more. Special consideration will be given to abstracts addressing Foucault’s Lectures at the Collège de France, but we welcome abstracts responding to his entire oeuvre. We are open to a broad array of subject focus areas in literary studies, rhetoric and composition, or creative writing, as well as any other disciplines within the humanities. By May 15, 2020, please submit an abstract of 200-300 words, a brief bio, and any A/V requests to Nicole Turner, Georgia State University, at [email protected] and Jessie McCrary, Georgia State University, at [email protected].

LIFE WRITING

Memoirists are often “breaking rules” and “making texts,” whether their works intend to or not. The production of identities and subjectivities across narrative spheres and histories—from genres like captivity narratives, slave narratives, and commonplace books, to contemporary iterations in memoir, blogs, social media, and reality television—challenge expectations for how lives can be documented and shared. Life writing crucially expands the bounds of what lives—and literatures—can look like, demanding that readers attend to histories, lives, languages, and experiences that are often unfamiliar or different from their own. This panel welcomes presentations on any aspect of life writing, and those projects that are related to the conference theme, Scandal! Literature and Provocation: Breaking Rules, Making Texts, are especially welcome. By June 1, please submit an abstract of 250 words, along with presenter’s academic affiliation, contact information, and A/V requirements, to Nicole Stamant, Agnes Scott College, at [email protected].

LITERARY MONSTERS
MONSTERS

In today's culture, it's almost impossible to avoid "monsters." Straight from mythology and legend, these fantastic creatures traipse across our television screens and the pages of our books. Over centuries and across cultures, the inhuman have represented numerous cultural fears and, in more recent times, desires. They are Other. They are Us. This panel will explore the literal monsters—whether they be mythological, extraterrestrial, or man-made—that populate fiction and film, delving into the cultural, psychological and/or theoretical implications. 

In addition to regular panel submissions, themed roundtables of 3-4 participants also will be considered. Please submit a 250-300 word abstract, a brief bio, and any A/V needs by May 20, 2020, to Tracie Provost, Middle Georgia State University, at [email protected].

LITERATURE AND THE ENVIRONMENT: ECOSYSTEMS, TEXTS, PROGRESS, AND PERIL
ASSOCIATION FOR THE STUDY OF LITERATURE AND THE ENVIRONMENT (ASLE)

Henry David Thoreau famously writes in Walden, “I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately, to front only the essential facts of life, and see if I could not learn what it had to teach, and not, when I came to die, discover that I had not lived” (85). When Thoreau left his community to live in the forest by Walden Pond, he committed a transgressive act. He avoided people in favor of nature and renounced society in favor of an individual life well lived. Bearing in mind Thoreau’s transgressive act and thinking in terms of SAMLA 92’s theme Scandal, participants are welcome to submit papers on any aspect of ecocriticism, literature, and the environment, especially as pertaining to ecological and literary progress and peril. By June 1, 2020, please submit a 200 to 250 word abstract, brief biographical statement (including academic affiliation and contact information), and A/V requirements to Dr. Whitney Larrimore Strickland, Methodist University, at [email protected]. This panel is affiliated with ASLE (Association for the Study of Literature and the Environment) and SAMLA 92 (November 13-15, 2020, in Jacksonville, Florida).

MACHINES IN 20TH CENTURY LITERATURE, PHILOSOPHY AND CINEMA

This panel explores the scandal of the machine’s pervasiveness in the Italian and European 20th Century literary, cinematographic, and philosophical panorama. Since the Industrial Revolution, machines have established themselves as a crucial and unavoidable presence of individual life and collective existence. The disturbing and fascinating vitality of the machine has shaped all social, political, and economic relationships and became capable of conquering the biological space. The very literary, cinematographic, and philosophical work was crossed by the new myth of the machine and met its complexity: it refused or exalted it, it let itself be inspired by it and analyzed its profound meaning. Experiencing both the new complex dialectic between humans and the machine and the new surprising relations between machines and living beings, always tense between fascination and terror, literary and cinematographic invention, and philosophical reflection has produced great aesthetic value. According to Michel Carrouge, “the mythical mana has passed down from the ancient kingdoms of nature (human, animal, vegetable, mineral) to the mechanical kingdom.” This panel focuses on how Italian and European literature, cinema, and philosophy dealt with such a new kind of colonization made possible by the massive coming of machines. By July 26, please send a 200-word presentation abstract, a 1- page CV and A/V requests to Giorgia Bordoni ([email protected]).

MEDICAL SCANDAL IN MEDIEVAL AND EARLY MODERN TEXTS

The intersections between studies of the history of medicine and literary analysis have proved especially useful to interpretations of medieval and early modern literature. SAMLA’s 2020 focus on Scandal! invites us to consider the ways that medicine was sometimes represented as a locus of scandal in early texts. This panel invites submissions on any topic related to medical scandal in medieval and early modern literature. How was medicine sometimes viewed as a place of social or sexual transgression? What medical practices or experiments were viewed as potentially scandalous? How did high profile medical events, such as the illness or death of a monarch or a well-known figure, reverberate in works of literature? Please submit abstracts of 200-300 words, a short bio and A/V requests to [email protected] and [email protected] by June 19, 2020.

MODERN DRAMA
MODERN DRAMA

This year's panel on Modern Drama seeks papers that deal with this year's theme of SCANDAL! Literature and Provocation: Breaking Rules: Making Texts. We are especially interested in papers that explore these themes as they relate to gender, race, sexuality, or family. We are interested in presentations that explore the theme of scandal, from the quotidian to the grotesque, with particular emphasis on gender, race, sexuality, and family. We strongly encourage panelists to consider drama by women, people of color, and people with disabilities. Please send 250 word abstracts, a short bio, and any AV requests to co-chairs Ashely Tisdale and/or Will Forde-Mazrui ([email protected]; [email protected]) by June 15, 2020.

MODERNISM IN TRANSLATION

This panel welcomes submissions on any aspect of modernism in/ and translation.

Topics could include, but are not limited to the following:

  • how translation complicates or troubles narratives and definitions of modernism, nation, and place
  • case studies of works by frequently translated modernist authors e.g. Borges, Rilke, Proust
  • modernists as translators e.g. Anna Akhmatova, Ezra Pound, Katherine Mansfield, Gertrude Stein
  • lesser-known late-19th/ early-20th-C translators (e.g. Yeita Sasaki's translations of Chinese and Japanese poetry, Frederick Jago's translation of Cornish-language texts, Ivor Montagu's translations of Russian literature)
  • indigenous modernisms and dialect translation e.g. Caribbean writers like Una Marson and Louise Bennett (Patois and Creole), Trude Weiss-Rosmarin's work on Hebrew and Arabic dialects, David Unaipon's use of Ngarrindjeri proverbs
  • interdisciplinary genres and translation (subtitles in film, multilingual magazines, travel guides etc.)
  • scandal in relation to mistranslations, misappropriation, and ideas that do not translate across cultures/ states/ institutions
  • modernist texts and translation problems (lacunae and lexical gaps, periphrasis, 'untranslatable' features, calques, gendered pronouns)
  • how translation studies intervene in debates related to world/ comparative/ postcolonial literature and new modernist studies

Please send an abstract of 200-250 words and a brief autobiographical paragraph to Dr. Louise Kane (University of Central Florida) at [email protected] by July 15, 2020.

NEOLIBERALISM IN LITERATURE AND MEDIA STUDIES
NEOLIBERALISM IN LITERATURE AND MEDIA STUDIES

Over the past seventy years, neoliberal thinkers have strategically reinvented classical liberal ideals in order to privilege a sense of personal freedom over the perceived overreach of government intervention. Once considered a fringe movement, neoliberalism has steadily become the central tenet of American life. It is now nearly impossible, for example, to imagine any mainstream voice espousing tax hikes or championing the sorts of policies enacted under Franklin Delano Roosevelt or Lyndon Johnson. Promises of privatization today trump collective action in virtually every aspect of life. This epistemic shift can be felt far and wide, from politicians to postmodern theorists. Given the focus of the SAMLA conference in 2020, we have a special interest in papers that explore how neoliberalism breaks the rules, or how it creates new rules to be broken. The panel will investigate symptoms of/responses to this ideological shift, particularly in the areas of literature and media studies. Please submit a 300-word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Michael Blouin, Milligan College, at [email protected] by no later than June 1, 2020.

PANCHO VILLA DID NOT SPEAK QUECHUA: CULTURAL DISTORTION AND REINFORCEMENT OF NEGATIVE STEREOTYPES

Popular media representations of past and living indigenous and Hispanic communities of North and South America (e.g., Pocahontas, Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull) have caused discomfort and indignation among audiences due to their multiple historical and geographical inaccuracies. In addition to cultural distortions, there are concerns regarding such media's alleged cultural misappropriations and the reinforcement of negative stereotypes that weigh upon Amerindians and Hispanic Americans.  This panel welcomes critical examinations of film, television series, literature, art, or other popular media that, through misrepresentation and/or misappropriation, have scandalized indigenous and Hispanic communities of North and South America. Please submit a 250-word abstract, a brief bio, and scheduling requests to Brennan Thomas ([email protected]) by July 15, 2020.

REPRESENTATIONS OF ADDICTION IN 19TH-CENTURY LITERATURES

The term “addiction” was not widely established in the 19th century. Even today, although amply attested in medical and legal dictionaries, it is not unambiguous: the label “addict” is highly stigmatizing, while “addiction” to yoga or organic sourdough is a status marker. Nineteenth-century writers nonetheless depicted recognizable states of dependency and loss of autonomy, which 21st-century readers find unmistakably familiar. This panel welcomes submissions which examine the fictional depiction of characters recognizable as addicts, whatever the nature of the compulsion (alcohol, opium, violence, gambling, tobacco, etc.), and which in particular draw out crucial inferences for current thinking about addiction and, more importantly, ethical responses to the crisis. The works examined may come from any literary tradition, but the paper as well as any handouts should be in English. By June 1, 2020, please submit an abstract of 300 words, a brief bio, and any A/V requests to Maureen Jameson, University at Buffalo (SUNY), at [email protected].

SCANDAL AND TRANSGRESSION IN TWENTIETH-CENTURY TRANSATLANTIC VANGUARDISMS

This panel explores forms of dissent adopted by twentieth-century transatlantic avant-gardes as a means of challenging traditional genres and social codes. Since the inception of European experimentalism during the first decades of the twentieth century, a series of art movements engaged in radical production that questioned the established state of affairs. From the Cubist adoption of multiple viewpoints, through the Futurist celebration of technology and speed, the Expressionist distortion of form, to the Dadaist sense of provocation and the irrational juxtaposition of images in Surrealism, avant-garde art and literature has set precedents on an international level of exchanges. Thanks to venues that exhibited the work of European expatriates, namely the Armory Show and Alfred Stieglitz’s gallery 291, along with journals such as Camera Work, American Modernists reinvented their own expressive language by rethinking the sense of place. Meanwhile, the Argentinian ultraístas, the Mexican estridentistas and muralistas as well as the Peruvian group of the journal Amauta, among others, took advantage of European experimental forms and their pre-Columbian past to reflect on the convulsive reality of Latin America. Based on the ideas of scandal, transgression and rebellion, topics might include, but are not limited to the following:

  • Graphic humor and the grotesque in the avant-garde.
  • The manifesto as a revolutionary form of protest.
  • The inflammatory language of soirees.
  • Transgressive print culture in the age of vanguardism.
  • The rupture of sequence: the snapshot, the montage, and the close up.
  • Scandals in Hollywood and the independent film industry.
  • Breaking the boundaries between the visual and the verbal: ekphrasis, photo-poetry and cinepoetry.
  • Subversive ideologies of public images.
  • Consumer society, mass media and the shock of advertising.

By July 30, 2020, please submit a 300-word abstract in English or Spanish along with a brief bio and A/V requirements to Leticia Pérez Alonso ([email protected]), Jackson State University.

SCANDAL AND THE TRICKSTER

The trickster figure, agent of disruption and change, has had numerous and diverse manifestations in literature, film, and popular culture. Joseph Campbell characterized the trickster as having “a very special property…he always breaks in…to trip up the rational situation. He’s both a fool and someone who’s beyond the system. And the trickster represents all those possibilities of life that your mind hasn’t decided it wants to deal with.” This panel will focus on how the trickster figure emerges as a catalyst for scandal, causing destruction, but ultimately leading to creative growth. Literary topics, as well as those exploring large and small-screen expressions, are welcome. Please submit an abstract of 200-250 words, a brief bio, and any A/V requests by June 30, 2020, to Myrna Santos at [email protected].

SCANDAL IN THE ARCHIVE: RECOVERING THE OUTRAGEOUS IN ARTIFACTS AND PRACTICES

This panel invites paper proposals that explore how scandalous and outrageous histories, cultures, individuals, or events are captured in archival records. It is also interested in uncovering “scandalous” archival practices that include the obscuration of marginalized communities within the archive. Topics might include, but are not limited to:

  • Discussion and analysis of archival projects that feature artifacts considered now, or in historical contexts, to be “taboo” or working to subvert social norms
  • Analysis of descriptive and/or organizational archival processes that “scandalize” the marginalized communities through inauthentic or unethical representation
  • Explorations of “reading” or locating scandal in the archive through new analyses of past records that may present sanitized versions of events
  • Reconstructions of scandalous events through an assemblage of archival recordsComparative analysis of the archival framing (through description, organization, and selection) around scandalous individuals, groups, communities, or events in contemporary and historical archives

Please send a 250-word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requests by June 30, 2020 to Suzanne Sink, Florida Atlantic University, [email protected].

THE SCANDAL OF ADAPTATION
ASSOCIATION OF ADAPTATION STUDIES

Taking its cue from Lawrence Venuti's work on the scandal of translation, the ways that translations of texts originally produced in other languages carry the power to affront the norms and assumptions of both source and target languages and cultures, this roundtable welcomes submissions on either particularly scandalous adaptations or the scandal of adaptation generally. Since most of the panel's time will be reserved for discussion, prospective participants are invited to submit abstracts for presentations from 5 to 10 minutes long, along with a brief biography and any A/V requests, to Thomas Leitch, University of Delaware, at [email protected] by 25 May 2020.

THE SCANDAL OF THE CROSS: CHRISTIANITY, LITERATURE, AND PROVOCATION
SOUTHEAST CONFERENCE ON CHRISTIANITY AND LITERATURE

In Romans and other epistles, Paul uses the Greek skandalon to capture the radical nature of the Christian Gospel. Emergent first-century Christianity was itself scandalous. Yet, centuries down the line, Christianity, and religion in general, is typically conceived of as anything but scandalous. Or, if it is, it’s because of corrupt leaders, coercive rhetoric, and fearful parochialism. This panel hopes to revisit the fecund, galvanizing relationship between Christianity and scandal. We welcome papers from any critical perspective on literary works that provocatively, even scandalously, engage with Christianity (or religion broadly). Papers might consider one or more of the following:

  • The relationship between blasphemy or heresy and religious vitality
  • How “scandalous” (transgressive, rebellious, heretical, etc.) texts serve to revitalize and/or recontextualize mainstream religious traditions
  • The nature and definition of prophetic literature (or literary depictions of prophet characters)
  • The question of authenticity in religious literature
  • Ways that literary texts reflect and/or respond to debates within and/or between religious traditions
  • The conventions and techniques of religious literature and their evolution over time
  • How religious writers turn to other religious traditions for resources by which to challenge their own
  • The relationship between scandal and the visibility/optics of religion
  • Pedagogical approaches to religious literature
  • Creative writing submissions addressing the panel theme are also welcome

Please send a 250-word proposal, a CV, and any A/V requests to Jordan Carson at [email protected] or Joshua Privett at [email protected]. For creative writing submissions, please submit the full work to be read and not an abstract. All abstracts or creative writing submissions are due May 31.

SCANDALOUS LETTERS

This special session welcomes submissions that offer critical attention to any form of Scandalous Letters. These might be in literary, film, or other genre that presents a story of scandal promulgated through some kind of letters, perhaps even emails or texts. By June 15, please submit an abstract of 250 words, a brief bio, and A/V requests to Joan E. McRae, Middle Tennessee State University and Shirley Kagan, Hampden-Sydney College, at [email protected] and [email protected].

SCANDALOUS PROFESSION(AL)S: SOVEREIGNTY, AUTHORITY, AND SECRECY

This panel welcomes proposals for papers or projects addressing any aspect of professional sovereignty, authority, or secrecy within or between professions. We invite conversations about the functions or representations of sovereignty, authority, or secrecy within any genre of Literature.

In Chapter 1 of The Social Transformation of American Medicine, Paul Starr writes, “Power, at the most rudimentary personal level, originates in dependence, and the power of the professions primarily originates in dependence upon their knowledge and competence. [T]heir interpretations often govern our understanding of the world and our own experience. To most of us, this power seems legitimate.”  Starr closely examines and tracks the sovereignty and authority of the medical profession within and about the United States. More broadly, however, he provides a model for narrativizing the developments and trajectories of sovereignty and authority within larger and more complex cultural, political, economic, and social systems.

The pursuit or maintenance of professional sovereignty and/or cultural authority creates a narrative that inherently contains issues of sectarianism, secrecy, feuding, transgression, rebellion, and ultimately, scandal. Such narratives afford discussions on a broad array of topics both within and about Literature.

Potential topics regarding the pursuit of professional sovereignty and its relation to scandal include, but are not limited to:

  • the production and/or consumption of literary texts
  • the production and/or consumption of literary analysis
  • the training of literary scholars and instructors
  • literary representations of specific professions or industries
  • literary representations of socioeconomic, cultural, or political authority either in flux or as barriers to access
  • specific literary genres and their internal traditions/motifs of sovereignty or external expressions of sovereignty

Please submit a 300-word abstract or proposal, a brief bio, and any A/V requests by July 28, 2020 to Paul Blom, UNC-Chapel Hill, at [email protected].

SCANDALOUS SPACES
MODERNIST LITERATURE

In 1907 at 46 Gordon Square, Bloomsbury Group writer and biographer, Lytton Strachey, famously walked into the drawing room, pointed at a stain on Vanessa Bell’s dress, and simply uttered, “Semen?” Both Vanessa and her sister, Virginia Woolf, paused for a moment and then burst out laughing along with Strachey. This comical moment that Woolf deemed as the “best illustration” of Bloomsbury caused “all barriers of reticence and reserve” to disappear between the group members. According to Woolf’s account in Moments of Being, “there was now nothing that one could not say, nothing that one could not do, at 46 Gordon Square.” Lytton Strachey’s one-word entrance into the drawing room is undoubtedly scandalous. This moment between Strachey, Bell, and Woolf mirrors the design of the room itself as Vanessa decorated the interiors using her radical, post-impressionist sensibilities. This combination of Strachey’s forward joke and the safety established between close friends in the Gordon Square drawing room created the kind of “scandalous” space that is so commonly associated with modernism. Whether they were writing about a complicated familial home, roaming around a metropolitan city, or displaced by colonization, modernists seem to have an inherent connection to scandalous space. 

In the spirit of the writers and artists who lived and worked at 46 Gordon Square, we invite paper submissions pertaining to the scandalous spaces of modernist literature (British, American, and European). We welcome projects that deal either with scandalous literary spaces (spaces depicted in works of literature) or the real-life spaces where authors lived and wrote (their domestic spaces, cities, workplaces, etc.). We are particularly interested in interdisciplinary projects that consider modernist literature in relation to art and crafts, interior design, landscape design, and architecture. Panelist will help shed light on some of the following questions: 

  • How do writers or characters recreate space for their own ends? To what extent are their spatial reconfigurations successful?
  • What do these scandalous spaces say about modernity and the modern condition?
  • How can physical space enable gender, class, or racial rebellions?
  • How do scandalous spaces help authors disrupt normative means of storytelling?
  • To what extent are traditional spatial boundaries (domestic space vs. the space of the metropolis, the private vs. public spheres, etc.) broken down in works of modernist literature?
  • How do modern socioeconomic issues and politics affect authors’ and/or characters’ engagements with space?

Please submit a 250-word abstract, a brief biographical statement (including affiliation), and AV requirements to Kelsey Carper ([email protected]) by August 1st, 2020.

SCANDALS IN GAMING: ADDICTIONS, ECONOMICS, AND ISMS IN THE ENTERTAINMENT INDUSTRY

Since the advent of the arcade to the world of entertainment, beginning with pinball in the 1930s and reaching its height in the 70s and 80s, and the rise in roleplaying games’ popularity with Dungeons and Dragons in the 1970s, dozens of controversies have emerged, ranging from the LaGuardia pinball ban and the Satanic Panic to the release of particularly inflammatory sequels (and prequels) by entertainment behemoths including Disney, Activision/Blizzard, and Electronic Arts. While most of these bouts of “entertainment outrage” might superficially be left to generational conflicts or disappointed expectations, there are in practically every instance various elements of frustration, misunderstanding, and even malice. These elements are rooted in gender and racial biases and stereotypes, corporate ethics, and politics, which produce the vitriol by which each is characterized and remembered.

This traditional session invites abstracts for papers, in accordance with SAMLA 92’s topic, dealing with scandals in and from film, public entertainment, and virtual realities, from 20th century to present. Subjects may include, but are not limited to:

  • Addiction and the Entertainment Industry
  • Gambling and Game Mechanics
  • Addiction and Alternate Realities
  • Racism in Entertainment
  • Gender and Sexuality in Entertainment
  • Discrimination in Entertainment
  • Ludic Ethics
  • Entertainment and Othering
  • Political Discourse in Entertainment and Public Spectacle

Abstracts should be 300-500 words and should include a brief bio and information regarding A/V requirements. Abstracts should be emailed to Andrew Simmons (University of Georgia, Dept. of Comparative Literature and Intercultural Studies) at [email protected] by August 10, 2020.

SPECULATIVE FICTION
SPECULATIVE FICTION

Speculative fiction covers a broad range of narrative styles and genres. The cohesive element that pulls works together under the category is that there is some “unrealistic” element, whether it’s magical, supernatural, or a futuristic/technological development: works that fall into the category stray from conventional realism in some way. For this reason, speculative fiction can be quite broad, including everything from fantasy and magical realism to horror and science fiction, from China Miéville to Margaret Atwood to Philip K. Dick. This panel aims to explore those unrealistic elements and all their varied implications about society, politics, economics, and more.  

In addition to regular panel submissions, themed roundtables of 3-4 participants also will be considered. Please submit a 250-300 word abstract, a brief bio, and any A/V needs by May 20, 2020 to Mert Gareis, Middle Georgia State University, at [email protected].

WALKING AS PROVOCATION: FLÂNERIE IN LITERATURE AND POPULAR CULTURE
FLÂNERIE IN LITERATURE & POPULAR CULTURE

Celebrating its sixth consecutive year at SAMLA, this regular session on flânerie continues to explore the topic of urban walking in literature, art, and popular culture. Engaging with the 2020 SAMLA conference themes of scandal and provocation, this year’s panel explores how flânerie in its various forms (across temporal, geographic, linguistic, and generic modes) elicits and/or generates outrage, affront, shock, disapproval or any other unexpected or unusual reaction or sentiment. How does the act of moving through urban environments by foot, or by alternative methods, engage the flâneur/flâneuse figure in practices that break rules and surprise?

Topics that might be considered include:

  • Representations of flânerie and affect
  • Rebellious and/or subversive flânerie
  • Flânerie as a threat to gender, social and political norms
  • Flânerie as shock and scandal

By July 3rd, 2020, please send abstracts of 250-500 words along with AV requests and short bio to both Kelly Comfort, Georgia Tech, at [email protected] and Marylaura Papalas, East Carolina University, at [email protected].

VIDEO GAMES AND LITERARY STUDIES

Video games are increasingly popular objects of critical study in the literature classroom. In the spirit of the theme of SAMLA 92, Scandal! Literature and Provocation: Breaking Rules, Making Texts, this panel invites papers that consider the provocative and controversial implications of studying video games in the context of literary studies. How are games, metagames, and game studies breaking texts and textual paradigms by creating new rules for studying literary objects, forms, and histories? The panel will investigate the affinities and divergences between games and literature, as well as the friction between game studies and literary criticism. Possible topics include: theoretical reflections on games and literary methods; pedagogical approaches to games in the literature classroom; close readings of video games that provocatively unsettle the literary-ludic spectrum; applications of literary theory to games; speculative and comparative analysis of games and literary history; etc. Please submit a 250-300 word abstract, a brief bio, and any A/V needs by June 30, 2020 to Craig Carey, University of Southern Mississippi, at [email protected].

^ Return to Category List


Italian Studies

ITALIAN STUDIES:  LITERATURE, MEDIA AND CULTURAL STUDIES
ITALIAN II (1600-PRESENT)

This panel is open to contributions on any period of Italian literature, cinema and media studies. Please send a 200-300 word abstract, brief bio, and request for A/V to the session organizer by July 30th, 2020

Chair: Annachiara Mariani, The University of Tennessee, [email protected]
Co-Chair: Silvia Tiboni-Craft, Wake Forest University, [email protected]

^ Return to Category List


Luso-Portuguese Studies

SUBJECTIVITY AND DISPLACEMENT IN CONTEMPORARY BRAZILIAN LITERATURE
LUSO-AFRO-BRAZILIAN STUDIES

This Regular Session welcomes submissions on the intersection of subjectivity and displacement in Contemporary Brazilian Literature. Abstracts addressing the conference theme are especially welcome. By July 29, submit an abstract of 200 words, a brief bio, and any scheduling requests to Cecilia Rodrigues, University of Georgia, at [email protected]

^ Return to Category List


Other Languages & Literatures

SCANDALOUS SHORT STORIES

This panel considers the genre of the short story juxtaposed with the conference's theme: Scandal. We welcome proposals considering short works of fiction that are scandalous, that caused a scandal, or that were inspired by scandal. By May 31st, please send a 200-word abstract, brief bio (no more than 75 words), and A/V requirements to Dr. Timothy K. Nixon, Shepherd University, at [email protected].

SCANDINAVIAN SCANDAL
SCANDINAVIAN LITERATURE

This session welcomes submissions on any aspect of scandal and Scandinavian literatures and culture. Scandal can be defined in the broadest of terms. Since this addresses the conference theme, proposals to this session will be especially welcome. By August 31, please submit an abstract of 250 words, a brief bio, and any A/V requests to Dr. Jay Lutz, Oglethorpe University, at [email protected].

^ Return to Category List


Pedagogy

CRIME AND COMPOSITION

This roundtable welcomes submissions showcasing the usage of the theme of crime writing to impart the goals of the English literature or composition classroom. Addressing the SAMLA 92 theme of Scandal! Literature and Provocation: Breaking Rules, Making Texts, we are interested in looking at crime as a heuristic or method of teaching. Examples include the following:

  • Crime-based literature
  • True crime podcasting
  • Conspiracy argumentation
  • Criminal investigation as a means of teaching research
  • Popular representations and visual rhetoric
  • Crime writing as genre

By June 15, 2020, please submit an abstract of 300 words, a brief bio, and any A/V requests to Jessie McCrary at [email protected] and Ashley Shaw at [email protected].

LANGUAGE TEACHING AND LEARNING IN THE MODERN ERA

This traditional session welcomes submissions from all aspects of language teaching and research, including, but not limited to, the integration of culture and literature into language teaching, first and second language acquisition, second language pedagogy, and linguistics or literature studies with application to language teaching or learning. We welcome submissions from the study of all languages, but the abstract must be in English. By September 6, 2020, please kindly submit an abstract of less than 500 words (excluding references), a brief bio, and any A/V requests to Dr. Jing Paul, Agnes Scott College, at [email protected] and Dr. Johnny Cheng, Emory University, at [email protected]. Please attach a Word document that includes your abstract, a brief bio and any A/V requests.

PEDAGOGY OF THE LITERATURE CLASSROOM

SAMLA’s 2020 conference theme, Scandal! Literature and Provocation: Breaking Rules, Making Texts, calls for us to consider how literature challenges, provokes, and aims to dismantle established power structures. This panel looks to examine our pedagogical approaches to teaching literature. In this session, we are interested in how and why your literature pedagogy breaks rules. For instance, do you teach an American Literature survey course but avoid the “canonical” works provided in an anthology? Or do you use an anthology but teach an American Literature course with a primary focus on queer authors? What in-class strategies or scandalous methods do you use to teach literature in your classes? If you wish to be considered, please complete this form no later than June 1, 2020. If you have any questions, please email the session chair, Dr. Kendra R. Parker, at [email protected].

SCANDALS: POWER, IDENTITY, AND RELATIONSHIP IN THE LANGUAGE ACQUISITION. THE POWER OF THE LANGUAGE IN THE LEARNING CLASS
PEDAGOGY POTPURRI

This panel welcomes submissions on any aspect of innovative pedagogies and approaches to language acquisition in the Language classroom. Projects and activities that utilize authentic and/or technology are welcome as well as new approaches and best practice to any aspects of teaching language, culture, and literature. Proposals addressing the conference theme are especially welcome. By May 31, 2020 please submit an abstract of 250 words, a brief bio, and any A/V requests to Angela Margherita Bozano, Victory, Milwaukee Italian Immersion School, at [email protected], and Silvia Giovanardi Byer, Park University, at [email protected].

TEACHING IN PROCESS: PEDAGOGY OF LITERATURE DESIGN WORKSHOP

Choosing literature for students and making instructional moves with creativity and confidence are challenges we often face alone, and we face these decisions in an ever-changing, often disruptive, curricular landscape where students bring different needs and questions. Are you interested in deepening and sharing your thinking processes for designing instructional goals and teaching decisions with literature? Would it be helpful to have an informal workshop structure to talk, share and support ideas in process?

Workshop Goals:

  • Explore literature as anchor texts for interdisciplinary learning;
  • Clarify enduring understandings with literature using "backwards design" and essential questions;
  • Articulate relationships between in-class activities and independent "preparatory" modules;
  • Embrace an opportunity to share your thinking about designing good practices in a literature-based context.

Workshop Structure:

  • (15 min) Moderator will present a menu of "design" options to shape group workshop discussions;
  • (45 min) Small group workshops;
  • (30 min) Whole group sharing / reflections.

Proposals: By August 8, interested participants should send a 200 word titled abstract of your instructional challenge teaching literature, the pedagogical context in which you teach, and what you want to accomplish and get feedback on during the workshop to Stephanie Hodde, PhD at Virginia Military Institute, at [email protected]. Participation limited to 24 people (6 groups of 4 with moderator).

TEACHING LITERATURE AND CULTURE IN THE FOREIGN LANGUAGE CLASSROOM

This panel welcomes submissions on any aspect of the teaching of literature and culture in the foreign language classroom. Topics can include effective pedagogical practices and research related but not limited to:

  • language education and cultural studies
  • bridging lower- and upper-level courses through culture;
  • integration of cultural products, practices, and perspectives into curricula;
  • developing intercultural awareness;
  • teaching global citizenship;
  • literature in a content-based framework
  • technology and digital media for the teaching of culture.

By July 15, please submit and abstract of 200 words, a brief bio, and any scheduling requests to Antonio Cardentey, Georgia Institute of Technology, at [email protected]

^ Return to Category List


Rhetoric & Composition

BANNED IS BETTER: Non-Traditional Students Relate to Banned Books

Much literature that has been censored or banned speaks to the lived truth of non-traditional college students--students who do not have a standard high school diploma, students who were not planning to attend college, first-generation students, students who are beyond the traditional college age, students who have major life and work responsibilities. The American Library Association lists literature that has been banned in educational settings and libraries because it presents diverse viewpoints, attacks the status quo, questions societal norms, uses profanity or offensive language, or includes stereotypes, violence, sexual content, or contains controversial issues. For many non-traditional students, the very characteristics that cause books to be banned are challenges they have faced in their daily lives. Their ability to relate to the subject matter often encourages them to complete reading assignments and write more sophisticated essays than with more traditional material. This panel welcomes submissions on successes and challenges in assigning or allowing students to choose texts that “break the rules” in traditional and co-requisite composition and literature courses at the two-year college level. By August 15, 2020, please submit an abstract of about 150 words, a brief bio, and any A/V requests to Karen Holley, Georgia State University’s Perimeter College, at [email protected]

BREAKING RULES AND MAKING TEXTS DURING THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC IN THE RHETORIC / COMPOSITION CLASSROOM
CRITICAL THINKING IN THE RHET/COMP CLASSROOM

Initially, the CFP for this session was centered on the idea of exploring “disciplinarity” in rhetoric and composition within the context of the transformation from scandal, transgression or rebellion against canonical works in writing and rhetoric into creative and effective composition and communication practices in the rhetoric and composition classroom. And then COVID-19 shut down our regular learning spaces and asked of teachers and students to adapt and adjust to virtual learning within a rather short time.

Worldwide, the race to contain the coronavirus has led to profound changes in social interaction and organization, namely “social distancing” or “physical distancing” practices according to CDC and WHO guidelines The goal was to minimize interpersonal contact to protect groups whose immune systems are compromised. College campuses turned to emergency eLearning as their dense and overarching social networks posed a risk for uninhibited community transmission of the virus (Weeden & Cornwell, 2020).

In response, this session seeks to offer a space for composition teachers to share how they transformed their physical classrooms into virtual ones and adapted their pedagogical practices to the new situation. Within their respective institutions, programs and initiatives, presenters should contextualize their insights when addressing one or more of the following questions:

  • To what degree has the pandemic forced teachers and students out of their comfort zones?
  • Which pedagogical strategies needed to be changed and how? Which could be transferred rather easily?
  • How has the pandemic impacted the visibility of individuals and communities?
  • In what ways has online learning and interaction among students and between teacher and student(s) changed the scope, format or learning outcomes of the course?
  • Which rhetorical or composition theory/theories has guided the transformation of the classroom space?
  • How has the pandemic impacted the course curriculum, assignment design, and the reading and assessment of student work?

As the process of adapting to new circumstances in and outside of the rhetoric / composition classroom is still ongoing, presenters can approach this CFP in two ways: by looking back, assessing the before and after, the transition, the roadblocks, etc. and by outlining plans and strategies, already agreed upon or contingent, for the near future.

Please submit a proposal / abstract (250 words) no later than July 27, 2020 to the session chair Steffen Guenzel as MS Word email attachment: steffen.guenzel(at)ucf.edu.

PLAGIARISM AS SCANDAL: BREAKING RULES AND MAKING TEXTS

As teachers of critical reading and writing, the “scandal” instructors of English probably discuss with our students most often is plagiarism. In fact, many students have learned to live in fear of being accused of plagiarism. As Rebecca Moore Howard states, “the pedagogical obsession with citation becomes a pedagogical obsession with denying students [their own] authorship.” Hanging over students’ heads are dire threats to their academic futures: failing a course, permanent transcript notations, suspension, or even expulsion. Research has shown, however, that most of the instances we might consider plagiarism have a correlative relationship to students’ lack of metacognitive critical reading and lack of comprehension about the mores of academic research and writing. In other words, students often are “breaking rules” as they are “making texts” not out of malice but out of ignorance. For students in transition courses—basic writing, first-year composition, and introductory literature courses—our work with them bleeds past content into schema required of them in college-level courses, including intellectual property. To make things even more scandalous, our own academic research schemas are changing because of the ways the internet has shifted our understanding of intellectual property and citation guidelines.

In light of the need to engage with difficult questions about how to de-scandalize plagiarism and allow students to rumble with the difficulties of shaping their intellectual schema for research and intellectual property, this roundtable discussion asks participants to develop 5-10 minute discussions that consider one or two of the following questions:

  1. What strategies help students better understand that plagiarism does not have one standard definition but shifts for every rhetorical situation?
  2. What classroom activities can engage students in the conversation?
  3. How can we ease students’ anxieties or fears about unintentional plagiarism? How can we help students feel more agency regarding plagiarism?
  4. What assignments or approaches help students understand the concept of intellectual property?
  5. What assignments or approaches help students go from a surface knowledge of syllabus or university handbook policies to a deeper understanding of how to apply policies in their writing?
  6. What are the most constructive (or productive) ways to address violations of an academic honesty policy with students?

Attendees will be invited to join in the conversation with roundtable presenters, bringing their own questions and experiences to bear on the questions. Further, we encourage undergraduate and graduate students to be participants and to attend so that, as Margaret Prince says, “students [may] add their own voices to that conversation.” Please send proposals of no more than 250 words to both Co-Chairs Deborah Manson ([email protected]) and Jill Parrott ([email protected]) by May 15. Proposals should outline which of the above questions participants wish to address, summarize responses to those questions, and indicate how they plan to engage attendants through the roundtable format.

RHETORIC AND THE PUBLIC UNIVERSITY

This panel welcomes any and all papers related to the general topic of rhetoric and the public university. Some guiding questions include, but are not limited, to the following:

  • What is the relationship between rhetoric and the public university? What should that relationship be or become?
  • How does the American public university deploy rhetoric to defend its existence? To legitimate its policies and procedures? To rationalize its special or not so special role in the society? To attract and retain students, faculty, and staff? To gain state and federal funding? To guard against governmental austerity and interference? To explain its part in American democracy? To justify its distinction from its private counterparts?
  • How have outside supporters of public universities defended their support?
  • How have outside critics framed their criticisms?
  • How have university insiders (i.e., academics working in rhetoric and composition, pedagogy, critical university studies, and identity-based fields such as African American Studies, Women’s Studies, LGBT Studies, etc.) entered into these debates?
  • How have newer issues such as student debt, academic labor, corporatism, neoliberalism, and globalism affected the rhetoric of the public university?

Please send a 200-300 word abstract along with a short bio and A/V requests to Robert Azzarello at [email protected] by June 15, 2020.

TEACHING WRITING IN COLLEGE

Teaching writing has always existed in the intersection of language and activism. Writing instructors encourage their students to attend to style, voice, and other aesthetic elements of their text. Writing instructors also encourage their students to think of their work as socially situated and able to effect change in the “real world” outside of the classroom. The "Teaching Writing in College" session welcomes all submissions but is particularly interested in those that consider writing instruction in relation to language, identity, power and relationships in and outside the writing classroom. Possible topics include but are not limited to:

  • Presentations that draw on student texts or amplify student voices;
  • Pedagogic using a civic engagement / service-learning approach;
  • Pedagogic foregrounding the role of social justice in writing;
  • Writing projects and/or assignments which address creative uses of language, voice, and identity;
  • Projects examining the creativity and/or voices of student writing;
  • Examinations of language difference;
  • Activist / alternative approaches to writing assessment; etc.

The session encourages presentations that draw on student work as a primary text as well as interactive presentations that engage audience members. Please send all abstracts to Lisa Diehl at [email protected] by July 1.

VOICES FROM THE 21ST CENTURY COMPOSITION CLASSROOM
CONFERENCE ON COLLEGE COMPOSITION AND COMMUNICATION (CCCC)

This panel welcomes submissions on any aspect of 21st Century College Composition Classrooms. By May 31, 2020, please submit a 200-word abstract, brief bio, and any A/V requirements to Deborah Coxwell-Teague, Flagler College, [email protected].

WE GO TOGETHER: ANALYZING AND CREATING TEXTS TO BROADEN AND STRENGTHEN THE SENSE OF COMMUNITY AMONG UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS

As the demographics defining the average college and university student change, so too does how students define themselves in terms of "communities."  Among many definitions, students may consider themselves part of communities where they live, as part of their ethnic or religious backgrounds, or based on their current interests or future professions. Encouraging students to strengthen their existing community ties or broaden their definition of "community" by "breaking the rules" in the way writing and literature is taught, analyzed, or created helps develop individual voice and sense of community involvement while provoking thought about what community and belonging means.

Panel Co-Chairs Josef Vice and Teresa Marie Kelly of Purdue University Global invite proposals to join their special session "We Go Together: Analyzing and Creating Texts to Broaden and Strengthen the Sense of Community among Undergraduate Students." Interested panelists might address questions including, but not limited to, how writing teachers encourage community and engagement, how writing assignments define community, or what are the tensions between individual writing voice and sense of community involvement and how can they be resolved. Panel participants are particularly encouraged to engage and involve audience members in this presentation rather than reading papers. Those interested should email a 250-word abstract, CV, and a brief bio to Josef Vice at [email protected] by May 31, 2020.


^ Return to Category List


Slavic Studies

SLAVIC STUDIES

Papers may treat the literary works of Slavic writers in any genre and from any literary period, tradition or theoretical perspective. Comparative literary approaches are also welcome, as are papers on grammar, film, or language teaching methodology. Please send abstracts of no more than 350 words, a brief bio, and any A/V requests by May 1 to Marya Zeigler, US Department of Defense, at [email protected]. Presenters must have updated membership in SAMLA.   

^ Return to Category List