SPECIAL SESSIONS

 

A ESCRITORA AFRO-BRASILEIRA: ATIVISMO E ARTE LITERRIA / THE AFRO-BRAZILIAN WRITER: ACTIVISM AND LITERARY ART

This is a question-and-answer session based on the publication, A Escritora Afro-Brasileira: Ativismo e Arte Literária [The Afro-Brazilian Writer: Activism and Literary Art], Editor: Dawn Duke. Belo Horizonte: Nandyala, 2016. 

This text features six leading Afro-Brazilian writers, Mel Adún, Cristiane Sobral, Conceição Evaristo, Débora Almeida, Esmeralda Ribeiro, and Miriam Alves, with each writer presenting an interview, an essay, and a sample of their literary production. Dawn Duke is editor of the work and presents an introductory essay explaining the direction and purpose behind such publication. 

The session will be comprised of 4 speakers – Sarah Ohmer, Dawn Duke, Rhonda Collier, and Mel Adun. 

The session’s moderator will be Sarah Ohmer. Mel Adun will be present as author. We would be very happy to include Cristiane Sobral, also as author if she is available. Dawn Duke will be present as editor and researcher of these women writers. Rhonda Collier will be present as researcher and discussant. Session moderator, Sarah Ohmer, time permitting, will raise 6 to 10 questions designed to stimulate dialogue. The session will allow audience participation. 

The purpose is to bring together writers and their critics in an open forum that allows writers to describe the intentions behind their artistry and gives their critics a chance to engage and debate with them. The main objective of this discussion is to come to a deeper understanding of the aesthetic elements and expressions that appear in their works. These seasoned writers have over time designed their own artistic techniques and approaches that they continue to use to offer interpretations of reality on their own terms. This session is interested in understanding what is unique about their literary versions as well as the reasons behind the directions they propose.

 

AFRICAN AMERICAN AND NATIVE AMERICAN WOMEN WRITERS
Tiya Miles and Sharon Holland, in their pivotal 2006 edited collection Crossing Waters, Crossing Worlds, ask “What happens when key issues in African diasporic experience, such as migration, freedom, citizenship, belonging, peoplehood, and cultural retention and creation, and key issues in Native American experience, such as tribalism, protection of homelands, self-determination, political sovereignty, and cultural-spiritual preservation and renewal, converge?” In light of these questions, this panel invites submissions that focus on the literary and artistic work of African American and Native American women from any historical era, either considered individually or intersectionally, with a focus on the topical issues Miles and Holland address above. Please send a 250-word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Carlye Schock at [email protected] by June 3rd.

THE AGENCY OF LANGUAGE IN CONTEMPORARY GLOBAL DISCOURSE

Language appears in various aspects and many facets of communication. However, the growing concern of encountering a language characterized by and constructed around an inherent ferocity highlights the strong interface between language and cultural, political, and sociological objectives and ideologies. The linguistic compositions that produce strategically vicious discourses communicated via digital media emphasize the heterogeneity within this conceptual framework. Apart from the consequences of what such strong rhetoric can invoke, such as crimes or suicides, the questions arise: To what extent is it possible to counteract such violent rhetoric in the articulation of humanitarian voices? How can language be used to advance new collaborative discourses? 

In an interview with Jacques Derrida (1930-2004), Julia Kristeva questions him on the notion of ‘meaning.’ Derrida responds: “It is true that at first the phenomenological extension of the concept of ‘meaning,’ appears much wider, much less determined. All experience is experience of meaning. Everything that appears to consciousness, everything that is for consciousness in general is meaning. Ednie Kaeh Garrison likewise notes:“[L] anguage has the power to shape consciousness.” Therefore, language provides a conceptual frame that embeds underlying power structures and ideologies. 

This session is dedicated to exploring language that counteracts the linguistic construction of a violent rhetoric in all of its iterations. We invite papers that look at the agency of language in a humanitarian sense as it emerges in diverse cultural, political, or linguistic forms. What role does consciousness take in the structure of language? 

Possible topics might include, but are not limited to: 

  • Gender, identity, and Intersectionality 
  • Contemporary political dialogues and debates 
  • Language theory 
  • Responses to acts of violence 
  • Psychology and psychoanalysis

Please send abstracts (250 words) and a short biography to Dr. Petra M. Schweitzer ([email protected]) and Dr. Casey R. Eriksen ([email protected]) by July 15, 2019.

 

THE AMERICAN WESTERN: COWBOYS VS. INDIANS: IS SOMETHING WRONG WITH THIS IMAGE?

 During a debate with William F. Buckley, Jr. in 1965, James Baldwin observed that it came as a great shock to realize, as he did, that when you were watching an American Western and were rooting for Gary Cooper killing the Indians, you were, in fact, one of the Indians. Baldwin went on to question how it is possible for one civilization to justify its subjugation of another, citing, of course, the treatment of both Native Americans and African Americans not simply in films, but in reality. Baldwin’s observations were not original at the time and in fact echo an ongoing debate about the role of the American Western in popular culture, specifically in the genre’s representation of Native Americans. Directors of classics in the genre such as John Ford have been frequently criticized for the way they either demean or patronize Native Americans in their often larger than life and even romanticized versions of the west and its supposed “winning.” The Western film has thus become a site where broader issues of power, authority, legitimacy, and the function of popular culture in both creating and communicating cultural values have been studied and debated. Papers discussing, exploring and/or defending/ countering these claims are welcome. Please send 250-300-word abstract, a brief biographical sketch, and any audio/visual needs by 31 May 2019 to [email protected].

 

ANIMALS IN THE MEDIEVAL AND EARLY MODERN IMAGINATION

This session responds to the conference theme of Languages: Power, Identity, Relationships by asking participants to consider how texts from the Medieval and Early Modern periods used language to negotiate human/animal relationships. Papers of particular interest may consider how language is imagined to blur the line between human and animal, whether that be in early medieval grammar textbooks, the Early Modern stage, or a time and place in between the two.By June 7, 2019, please send a 250-word abstract, brief bio, and any A/V requirements to Brian Cook, Auburn University, at [email protected].

 

 

ASIAN/ASIAN AMERICAN VOICES OF THE PAST, PRESENT, AND FUTURE

This panel welcomes research papers on any aspect of studies in literature, language, rhetoric, and arts within the realm of Asian / Asian American Studies, with a special focus on how language shapes constructions of power, identity, and/or relationships. Comparative or interdisciplinary studies, transnational, multiethnic, and cross-cultural research that are related to the SAMLA 91 theme, Languages: Power, Identity, Relationships, are especially welcome. Please submit a 250-300-word abstract/proposal, a brief bio or CV, and any A/V requirements to Shannon I-Hsien Lee, Georgia State University, at [email protected], by May 30, 2019.

 

BIG BOOKS: WHY BOTHER?

In an age of overstimulation, “information overload,” and (allegedly) shrinking attention spans, a genre of fiction that appeared to peak in the U.S. in the 1970s and 1980s—that is, the big, postmodern novel—has made a comeback. Whether one calls it the maximalist novel, the Mega-Novel, the encyclopedic narrative, or “hysterical realism,” it has become clear that the strange, sprawling novel has become increasingly popular and, with postcolonial and global authors such as Salman Rushdie, Roberto Bolaño, Zadie Smith, Vikram Chandra, Marlon James, and Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie contributing to the genre in the last few decades, increasingly diverse.  The obvious question is why: why do authors continue to write—and why do people continue to read—erudite and encyclopedic novels?  What are some of the imaginative, intellectual, ethical, and political consequences of spending weeks, and even months, reading a single text?  Why, as our session title indicates, do people continue to “bother” with “big books”?

This panel seeks papers that analyze the maximalist novel, broadly defined.  Possible topics include:
 -the challenges and benefits of reading big books.
-maximalism and ethics, politics, history, etc.
-the gender, class, racial, and/or sexual politics of big books
-genre conventions and terminology
-the maximalist novel: a global or American genre?
-maximalism and globalization
-Close readings of individual texts
-analysis of the oeuvre of one or more maximalist novelists 
-the history and/or future of the genre
-maximalism and modernism, postmodernism, etc.
If these or other questions excite you, please send a 250-word abstract/proposal, a brief bio, and A/V requirements to Benjamin Bergholtz, Georgia Institute of Technology, [email protected], by May 27th.

BURSTING THE BUBBLE OF STUDY ABROAD: INTEGRATING STUDY ABROAD INTO BROADER EDUCATIONAL GOALS

PEDAGOGY POTPOURRI

In this roundtable discussion, we will address diverse ways in which institutions and departments can help students prepare for, go through and process study abroad experiences.  We will discuss the possibilities of designing pre, during and post study abroad experiences with the intention to a) prepare students to study abroad and help them process the experience when abroad and as they return to their home country and b) help students develop intercultural competence through this process. During the discussion, we will be using the course sequence designed at our university as a point of departure to discuss different ways in which we would like to see the study abroad experiences integrated into departmental (disciplinary), as well as wider, institutional curricular goals. How can we help students integrate their study abroad experiences into their broader intellectual trajectories, as well as department and university’s broader educational goals of increasing their gains in intercultural competence and cultural self-awareness? 
 
Attendees will be encouraged to share specific activities they have used successfully to help students reflect on home and/or host cultures. We hope attendees will leave the session with concrete ideas for fostering student reflection before, during, and after their study abroad experiences, helping students to understand how their experiences and knowledge gained abroad connect to the rest of their college experience and education. By May 30, please submit a 150-word abstract and brief bio to Ketevan Kupatadaze, Elon University, [email protected].
CONTEMPORARY ANGLOPHONE LITERARY FICTION (2009-2019)

This panel welcomes presentations on literary fiction produced in the last decade (2009-2019). As we come to the end of the 2010s, what do different works of literary fiction represent, problematize, and critique? How has contemporary literary fiction continued to shift political, social, and cultural questions? As the SAMLA 91 conference description notes, "we believe in the power of language to change lives and make our world a better place for all.” How has literary fiction of the 2010s produced such language and power? Arising in contemporary studies is the phrase “literary activism.” How is this playing out in pieces of literary fiction produced in the last decade? Abstracts (100-250 words) may be submitted to Preston Taylor Stone (Univ of Miami) at [email protected] with the subject “SAMLA 91” on or before May 15, 2019. 

 

THE CREATIVE WRITING CLASSROOM'S CROSS-CURRICULAR BENEFITS

The practice and skill gleaned in the creative writing classroom has benefits that ripple outward from the practice of one genre benefiting another to students benefiting in the composition classroom to second-language students approaching ESL in more graspable ways and beyond. The attention to details of craft in a space that allows for creative work benefits the student’s ability to think critically, analyze, and use language in rhetorically without having to conform to standard composition forms. In this panel, we will discuss the concrete ways that creative writing courses and programs build language and investigative skills that prepare them to communicate more clearly when working toward other goals. By June 15, 2019, please submit via attachment an abstract, bio, and any A/V requests to Dr. Emily Schulten Weekley, at [email protected]

 

CRITICAL UNIVERSITY STUDIES

This roundtable welcomes submissions on any aspect of Critical University Studies. Topics that examine the relationship between higher education and society could include specific institutional histories, critical pedagogy, the public/private divide, student debt, academic labor, and legitimation crises in the humanities. By 27 May 2019, please submit an abstract of 250 words, a brief bio, and any A/V requests to Robert Azzarello, Southern University at New Orleans, at [email protected].

 

THE CULTURAL LEGACY OF BURT REYNOLDS

In light of his recent passing, this roundtable discussion seeks participants to discuss any aspect of the status of Burt Reynolds as a film and pop-culture icon. Participants addressing Burt Reynolds and his place in the media landscape within the context of the conference theme regarding language and its relation to power, identity, and relationships are especially welcome. Please submit a 250–300-word pitch, brief bio, andA/V requirements to Kristopher Mecholsky (Louisiana State University) and Jerod Ra’Del Hollyfield Carson - Newman University) at [email protected] and [email protected].

 

DH PROJECTS IN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE: THE STATE OF THE FIELD
This roundtable invites lightning talks presenting current projects that employ DH methodologies to analyze humanities data. We welcome proposals for short presentations (7-10 minutes) of DH projects in any stage of development, related to the study of language and/or literature. Proposals may be pedagogy- or research-oriented. Projects might include:
  • Digital archives
  • Network analysis
  • Data visualizations
  • Spatial humanities
  • Text mining
  • Humanities gaming
  • Etc.
Please submit 250-word abstract, short bio, and AV requests to Elizabeth Coggeshall ([email protected]) by June 10, 2019.

 

EROTICISM, POWER, AND IDENTITY IN THE EARLY MODERN DRAMA OF JOHN WEBSTER

This panel concerns the circulation of power, identity, and eroticism in John Webster's drama. By May 1, 2019, please submit a 250-word abstract, a brief bio, and any A/V requests to William Rampone, South Carolina State University, [email protected].

 

FRANCOPHONE TRANSNATIONAL CINEMA

Including but not limited to the French language alone, Francophone is broadly defined here as pertaining to the voices and perspectives of people who have some association with Frenchness, whether through a shared colonial past or some other cultural connection.  Transnational Cinema encompasses a multifaceted approach to film theory and criticism that involves a rigorous, nuanced analysis of all aspects of film production and consumption: auteur and audience, cast and crew, space and place, and themes and ideologies.  “Francophone Transnational Cinema” invites an array of submissions that will offer a comprehensive examination of any facet of this richly diverse cinema: individual films; filmmakers; technical aspects of filmmaking, including funding and distribution; theoretical considerations, frameworks or perspectives; social categorizations and/or their intersectionality. Please submit an abstract of approximately 300 words, a brief bio, and any AV requests to Leah Tolbert Lyons (Middle Tennessee State University) at [email protected] by July 1, 2019.

 

GET UP, STAND UP: THEMES OF PROTEST IN LITERATURE, FILM, AND MUSIC

Elie Wiesel believes that “We must always take sides.  Neutrality helps the oppressor, never the victim.  Silence encourages the tormentor, never the tormented.” With these words in mind, this panel invites abstracts for papers that consider themes of protest in literature, film, and music.  Prospective panelists may consider, but are not limited to, texts from authors such as W. E. B. Du Bois and James Baldwin, the impact of larger movements such as the Beats, and/or films like Fahrenheit 451 and V for Vendetta. Speakers may also examine lyrics and music from musicians and groups such as the Ramones, Bob Marley, The Beach Boys, and the Geto Boys.  What is the continued relevance of these voices?  Who has picked up these ideas and continues to speak in opposition to our oppressors?  Please submit a 150-word abstract to William Nesbitt at [email protected] along with a brief biographical statement and any A/V requirements.

 

IDEOLOGIES OF EMPIRE IN SPANISH CULTURE (19TH THROUGH 21ST CENTURIES)

Through the current electoral processes, the political discourse practiced in present-day Spain evidences the relevance of a lingering--and, at times, embarrassing--imperialist ideology as an integral part of Spain’s nationalism(s). While the resurgence of this ideology may have surprised some observers, its traces are not difficult to identify in modern Spanish culture. The purpose of this panel is to explore the imprint of imperialism in literary and visual works (including paintings, film and TV) from the 19th-century (the time when the Spanish empire supposedly comes to an end) to the current times, in order to examine the production, justification or rejection of such ideology within the ongoing construction of Spain’s national identities. Please submit a 200-word abstract in English or Spanish, a short bio, and A/V requests by June 10 to Luis Alvarez-Castro at [email protected].

 

INDIGENOUS SPECULATIVE AND SCIENCE FICTION
This panel welcomes submissions on any aspect of Indigenous science fiction, futurism, or speculative fiction. By May 31st, please submit an abstract of 250 words, a brief bio, and any A/V requests to Dr. Megan Vallowe, Dalton State College, at [email protected].
 

 

ITALIAN IDENTITY: POWER AND RELATIONSHIPS

Considering the nation as an “imagined community,” this interdisciplinary panel seeks to investigate how Italianess is represented within and beyond the Italian borders. Specifically, we seek to investigate how through any sort of cultural production an Italian identity is expressed and how this differs in its interpretation. What relationships are created by this identity across the different social realities and geographies? We look at possible answers to this and other questions from any possible perspective and realities. 

This session welcomes any cultural production included but not limited to literature, poetry, films and media, artifacts, photography, plays and more. An interdisciplinary approach is also encouraged. This panel accepts presentations of any time period related to the Italian Identity, power and relationships, and a comparative approach is also welcome especially with other nationalities/cultures involved with Italy. The presentations may include but are not limited to the following topics through any theoretical approach: 

  • Italian Migrants abroad (e.g. USA, Canada and so on) Immigrants in Italy
  • Italian Postcolonial Legacies
  • Italian/Italophone Jews communities 
  • Globalization, Glocalization and Transculturalism Italy and its Borders
  • Italy and Mediterranean studies 

Please submit via email a 200-250 words abstract of the presentation along with, a brief bio, and requests for audio-visual equipment to Rosario Pollicino: [email protected] by May 31th, 2019. 

 

JAMES BOND AS POPULAR ICON: GOLDFINGER AT 60 (AND 55)

Goldfinger—the seventh James Bond novel by Ian Fleming published in 1959—has achieved an iconic status in the series. The novel brings together many of Fleming’s chief strengths as a writer—such as his vivid creation of larger-than-life-villains, suspenseful description of competitive games, and evocation of the power of precious metals and stones. The novel also introduces key “gadgets” such as the Aston Martin DBIII, and explores key Fleming themes such as organized crime, homosexuality, and American culture. Equally, if one film can claim to have established the identity of Bond as a global cinematic icon, that film is Goldfinger. Guy Hamilton’s 1964 adaptation set the formula of the Bond movie for decades, complete with thrilling pre-title sequence, dazzling opening credits and powerful theme song (sung here by Shirley Bassey), deadly henchman (Oddjob) and the gadget-laden car (the Aston Martin DBV). This panel will use the 60th and 55th anniversaries of novel and film in 2019 as an opportunity to examine the enduring power of various elements of the Bond “formula” created by Fleming and the filmmakers, and to reevaluate the continuing popularity of Bond in popular culture. Paper proposals are invited on any aspect of Fleming’s novel, Hamilton’s film, and the relationship between the novel and its adaptation. Given the conference theme of “Languages: Power, Identity, Relationships,” papers that explore the language of Fleming, and/or issues of power, identity, and relationships in Goldfinger are especially welcome.  Please send 250-word proposals, brief bios, and A/V requirements to Oliver Buckton ([email protected]) and Matt Sherman ([email protected]) by May 15th, 2019.

 

JAMES BOND'S IDENTITY CRISIS: ON HER MAJESTY'S SECRET SERVICE AT 50

In 1969, the world of film was presented with an almost unthinkable breach of protocol: in the new James Bond film, On Her Majesty’s Secret Service (OHMSS) the familiar face of Sean Connery was no longer James Bond, instead; the global icon 007 was represented by an unknown Australian actor/model, George Lazenby. As Lazenby’s only Bond film, OHMSShas been neglected—and maligned—as a “misfit” in the James Bond series. Not only does the film begin with Bond attempting to resign from the Secret Intelligence Service, but it is the only film in which Bond—the permanent bachelor--does the unthinkable and gets married to Tracy di Vicenzo (powerfully played by Diana Rigg). The tragic conclusion of the film and escape of Ernst Stavro Blofeld also makes it an anomaly, a radical departure from the “Bond defeats the villain and gets the girl” formula. The time has come, at this 50th anniversary of the film, to reevaluate it and examine the “identity crisis”—both that of James Bond himself and of the Eon Bond film series—it represented. This panel welcomes papers on any aspect of the 1969 film of OHMSS, directed by Peter Hunt, and/or the novel by Ian Fleming, published in 1963, of which it is a surprisingly close adaptation. Please send 250-word proposals, brief bios, and A/V requirements to Oliver Buckton ([email protected]) and Matt Sherman ([email protected]) by May 15th, 2019.

 

JESMYN WARD

Jesmyn Ward writes with a power that is transformative for all who read her works.  Using myths of the near past and ancient past, Ward creates stories of contemporary families struggling to maintain their humanity while trying to stay alive.  In Salvage theBones, motherless, pregnant Esch, and her father and brothers sit directly in the path of Hurricane Katrina, and they sit directly in the path of extreme poverty.  Using this little community, Ward presents scene after dramatic scene connecting the ancient mythology of Jason and Medea to the modern reality of impoverished heroes.  In her second National Book Award novel, Sing Unburied, Sing, Ward describes vivid and unforgettable characters. Pop, Mam, Jojo, and Leonie struggle with grace and dignity to hold their little family together even as they are confronted with a past so deeply embedded with cruelty and discrimination.  Ward uses the dead to haunt the undead and creates characters who need to be heard and, as Ward says, have some agency. Papers that address these issues or other themes in Ward's work are welcome. Please send a 200-word abstract to Mary Willingham, Mercer University, [email protected], by May 15, 2019 along with presenter's academic affiliation, contact information, as well as a short biography and A/V requirements.

 

KATE CHOPIN: A PORTRAYAL OF CREOLE LIFE THROUGH LANGUAGE AND CULTURE
AMERICAN LITERATURE (PRE-1900)
Kate Chopin's short stories and novella offer a unique image of late nineteenth-century Creoles. Chopin's rich use of the French language and Creole customs creates a portrait of a vibrant people who assimilated and yet maintained their lifestyle. Any paper on her work will be considered, although papers that relate to the SAMLA conference theme are encouraged. By June 7, 2019, please submit a 250-word abstract, brief bio, and any A/V requirements to [email protected].

 

THE KINGDOM OF THIS WORLD: HEGEMONY AND THE CARIBBEAN

Given its history of violence, transitions in ownership, and economic exploitation, the Caribbean has become a fertile, discursive construction that is rich in the separation of the “Self” and the “Other.” Ironically enough, however, the Caribbean is a multicultural entity in which the identity of the “Self” and the “Other” continually becomes exceedingly unclear. This panel will explore dialogues engendered through hegemonic and counter-hegemonic representations of the Caribbean. 

We invite submissions in Spanish, French, and English. By June 1, 2019, please send a 250-word abstract, brief bio, and any A/V requirements to Forrest Blackbourn, Dalton StateCollege, at [email protected].

 

LANGUAGE AS AN INFLUENCE ON ATTITUDES, VALUES, AND SELF IN FILM, LITERATURE, DRAMA, AND POPULAR CULTURE

Language can be a powerful force: it has the ability to gain power over others, be it political or personal; it can be manipulated to show how we want others to view and evaluate ourselves and how others perceive us; and it can demonstrate how a reader or viewer evaluates a character. Factors exerting such influence include diction, accent, and dialect. This panel will explore how language choice, spoken or written, is used by authors, playwrights, or screenwriters, with special emphasis on how language can influence readers’ or viewers’ perceptions and evaluations of characters. This session welcomes submissions on any aspect of language including considerations of reification, discourse analysis, accent perception, conversational analysis, and sociolinguistics.Please submit an abstract of 200-350 words, a brief bio, and any AV requests by May 30th  to [email protected].

 

THE LANGUAGE OF TRUTH ON THE EARLY MODERN STAGE 

This session will respond to the conference theme of “languages” by addressing the language of truth on the early modern stage.  How do characters identify and categorize “truth”?  What is “truth,” how does one identify it, and what value is ascribed to it? The panel welcomes a variety of approaches to the topic. Please send title, abstract (350 words max), and abbreviated cv by April 19, 2019 to Dr. Katie Smith at: [email protected].

 

THE LANGUAGES OF FASHION: STYLE, EXPRESSION, AND IDENTITY

This panel explores fashion as a system of language, expression, production and consumption. Examining both textual and graphic representations of fashion, we seek papers that engage with the 2019 SAMLA conference themes of language, power, identity and relationships. Approaches that examine how fashion, dress, design and style are a means of exercising and maintaining power, forging identity, and affecting relationships are welcome. Papers on gendered dressing, (un)fashionable identities, anti-fashion, and various kinds of fashion (or fashionable) relationships during the Victorian, Modern, or contemporary eras are welcome. We also encourage submissions that examine sartorial themes in literature, theater, art, film, photography, design, periodicals, digital media, and other aesthetic modes of expression. Questions that might be addressed include: 

  • What are the languages of fashion, and what do they communicate? In addition to textual and visual, what other expressions of fashion exist?  
  • How effective is fashion as a form of power? What are the movements and social formations showing meaningful connections between aesthetics and politics, particularly as related to dress and style? 
  • How have artists and writers incorporated fashion and dress in their work as a means to express identity, both on a personal and on a collective level?
  • How has fashion shaped relationships or emerged as an important component of relationships? 

By May 24, 2019, please send abstracts of 250-500 words along with AV requests and short bio to both Loretta Clayton, Middle Georgia State University, at [email protected] and Marylaura Papalas, East Carolina University, at [email protected].

 

THE LANGUAGE OF THE VISUAL AND TWENTIETH-CENTURY TRANSATLANTIC VANGUARDISMS
This panel explores the power of image culture in shaping the visual identity of twentieth-century transatlantic vanguardisms. Since the inception of European experimentalism during the first decades of the twentieth century, a series of art movements engaged in radical art production that defied conventions. From the Cubist adoption of multiple viewpoints, through the Futurist celebration of technology and speed, the Expressionist distortion of form, to the Dadaist sense of provocation and the irrational juxtaposition of images in Surrealism, visual art has set precedents for literature on an international level of exchanges. Thanks to venues that exhibited the work of European expatriates, namely the Armory Show and Alfred Stieglitz’s gallery 291, along with journals such as Camera Work,American Modernists reinvented their own expressive language by rethinking the sense of place. Meanwhile, the Argentinian ultraístas, the Mexican estridentistas and muralistas as well as the Peruvian group of the journal Amauta, among others, took advantage of European experimentalism and their pre-Columbian past to reflect on the convulsive reality of Latin America. Based on the ideas of vision, visuality and visualization, topics might include, but are not limited to the following:
 
—The visual content of the manifesto as a revolutionary form of protest.
—Cinema celebrity culture and the male gaze.
—The fusion of verbal and visual codes: photo-poetry and cinepoetry.
—The literary adaptation of the snapshot, the montage and the close up.
—Ekphrastic literature on films, photographs and comic characters in the Hollywood industry.
—The visual provocation of avant-garde soirees.
—Transatlantic vanguardism and print culture.
—Underlying ideologies of public images.
—Graphic humor and the grotesque in the avant-garde.
—Mass media and consumer society.
 
By May 31st, 2019, please submit a 300-word abstract in English or Spanish along with a brief bio and A/V requirements to Leticia Pérez Alonso ([email protected]), Jackson State University.

 

LATINX LITERATURES AND ARTS: POWER, IDENTITY, RELATIONSHIPS

Echoing the words of Jacques Derrida, "What cannot be said above all must not be silenced but written," as well as those of Chicana thinker Gloria Anzaldúa, “Ethnic identity is twin skin to linguistic identity-I am my language. Until I can take pride in my language, I cannot take pride in myself," the diverse Latinx literary and artistic traditions seek to give voice, empower, and provide a platform for Latinx subjects to assert and showcase their identity.

Nowadays, one can safely affirm that Latinx cultural expressions (whether through letters or other arts) are consolidated in the US cultural milieu, albeit they still are regarded as the voice of a minority vis-à-vis the US dominant culture. In some cases, Latinx are also regarded as minority/outsiders with regards to the cultural discourses of their Latin American cultures of origin.So, while Latinx ‘have arrived,’ there is still a persisting contestation of the different mainstreams in their pursuit of a topos of enunciation.

This panel welcomes papers that address the notion and/or praxis of Latinx Literatures and Arts as cultural and socio-political activism of empowerment and affirmation of identity that foster a betterment of Latinx relationships with the rest of US cultures and literary and artistic traditions, as well as with those traditions in their Latin American cultures of origin.

Presentations should be a maximum of 20 minutes long, in English or Spanish. Please submit a 250-word abstract, current CV, and A/V requirements as an attachment by May 10, 2019 to Ignacio F. Rodeño, The University of Alabama, at [email protected].

 

LIFE WRITING

If “our language is our identity,” as the SAMLA 91 conference call for panels notes, then considering how we narrate our lives is of the utmost importance. In the decades since the “memoir boom” around the turn of the millennium, it has become commonplace to consider the production of identities and subjectivities across narrative spheres and histories: from genres like captivity narratives, slave narratives, and commonplace books, to contemporary iterations in memoir, blogs, social media, and reality television, it is obvious that life writing matters. Life narratives demand that readers attend to histories, lives, languages, and experiences that are often unfamiliar or different from their own. This panel welcomes presentations on any aspect of life writing, and those projects that are related to the conference theme, “Languages: Power, Identity, Relationships,” are especially welcome. Please submit a 250-word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requests to Nicole Stamant, Agnes Scott College, [email protected] by May 30, 2019.

 

METAMODERNISM

In 2010, Timotheus Vermeulen and Robin van den Akker published their "Notes on Metamodernism," which outlined the phase of literature and society following Postmodernism. This session invites papers exploring metamodern readings of literary and social movements and metamodern identity creation. Being a movement with a "self" at the heart, the conference theme lends itself particularly well to metamodern interpretations, and proposals addressing that theme are especially welcome. By June1st, please submit an abstract of 250 words to Rachel Perry, Auburn University, at [email protected].

 

THE MODERN INDIGENOUS NOVEL: WHAT'S THIS ABOUT, WHO WROTE IT, AND WHY?

This panel seeks papers and presentations about novels written by Indigenous authors that focus on any aspect of Indigeneity related to modern or recent times. Scholars with an interest in literature written by Indigenous authors writing about indigenous issues exceptional and unique to Australia, New Zealand, Europe, Latin America and Asia, along with Canada, Mexico, the United States and other parts of North America are especially encouraged to submit abstracts.

Please submit a 300-500 word abstract, a brief bio and/or resume or CV, as well as A/V requirements by June 1st, 2019, to Dr. David C. Muller at Georgia Southern University: [email protected].

 

NARRATIVES OF RACE AND MENTAL HEALTH

In her new book, Black Madness :: Mad Blackness(Duke 2019), Therí A. Pickens argues that the “relationships between Blackness and madness (and race and disability more generally) are constituted within the fissures, breaks, and gaps in critical and literary texts” (3). How might we use literary texts as theoretical sources to help excavate or reveal the fissures, breaks, and gaps around the tenuous interstices of race and mental health? This panel welcomes short papers on literary, creative, or theoretical works that tend to, implicitly or explicitly, the complex relationships between notions of racial difference/sameness and mental health, disability, or illness. Potential topics might include, but are not limited to: blackness and madness, whiteness and depression, melancholia, hysteria, the medico-legal parameters of insanity, religious devotion, the Blues. Papers on texts prior to 1900 are especially encouraged as are papers addressing the conference theme on sustainability. Please submit a 250-word abstract, a brief bio, and any access or A/V needs to Justin Shaw, Emory University, [email protected], by 10 June 2019.

 

NUANCING THE LANGUAGE DEBATE IN AFRICAN LITERATURE

The language debate between Ngugi wa Thiong’o and Chinua Achebe has long defined the discourse about language use in African literature. Achebe’s argument that the writer can “Africanize” the English he or she is using (by infusing words, phrases, idioms, songs, proverbs, stories, dialogue, etc. into the writing) is very compelling because it offers writers a practical means of reaching a wider audience and it ensures African literature a prominent space in the global literary landscape. Ngugi’s position, introduced in Decolonizing the Mind and reinforced more recently in Something Torn and New: An African Renaissance, laments the devastating losses that resulted and are still resulting from the dismantling of indigenous languages under colonialism, as evidenced by the persistent dominance of colonial language across the continent, even sixty plus years after the beginning of the independence movements that ushered in the official liberation from European control. While many complain that Ngugi’s uncompromising insistence on mother tongue is too restrictive, his ideas about language, identity, and culture are extremely compelling, as is his optimism that Africans can recover their lost selves by reengaging with their mother tongues and employing translation as an essential tool to access literary works produced across the continent. This panel welcomes papers that examine the work of African writers who attempt to break down this “master language”/ mother tongue divide by nuancing the language debate in one manner or another. Theoretical discussions are also welcome. Please send abstracts of 250 – 300 words to [email protected] by June 10th.

 

THE POWER OF LANGUAGE TO CREATE IDENTITIES AND RELATIONSHIPS IN SPANISH, LATIN AMERICAN AND LATINX LITERATURE AND CULTURE 

We would like to receive works that analyze relationships between the power of languages and the possibility / reality of creating identities through this power, as well as the possibility / reality of creating relationships. We accept papers in English and Spanish. Please send your abstract of 300 words to [email protected].

 

THE PROFESSION OF ARTS & HUMANITIES: THE VIEW FROM "BOTH SIDES OF THE DESK"

The metaphor of “Both Sides of the Desk” is an image of looking at something from two different vantage points – in this case, the vantage point of the candidate who is applying for a faculty position and “sitting on” one side of a job search conversation.  On “the other side of the desk,” the search committee member or department chair is seated, evaluating the candidate, and, later, interviewing the hopeful applicant.  

Whether you are conducting a job search, serving on a departmental search committee, or chairing a department, and whether you are a student, instructor, professor, or administrator in Arts & Humanities, this panel is designed to support your professional development.   Potential panelists are invited to share strategies on topics such as how professionals in Arts & Humanities fields can enhance their job prospects, prepare for campus visits, construct meaningful CV’s, and strengthen tenure and promotion applications.  This panel also invites presentations related to the process of chairing search committees, the hiring process within academia, and, equally important, strategies related to determining which candidates will not only be exceptional scholars and teachers but exceptional community members and colleagues.    

Please submit abstracts for papers or posters (250 words) related to the profession of Arts and Humanities to [email protected].  Abstracts are due by July 15, 2019.

 

 

ON ENDS AND ENDINGS

This panel aims to explore the rhetoric of ends and endings, whether they be concrete and material (the end of a book) or more contentious and conceptual (the end of an era). How do we talk about endings when they arrive? And how can language claim power over events by pronouncing them finished? Potential paper topics might include periodization and historiography, "late" style, life-writing and reflections on mortality, apocalyptic fiction and the anthropocene, or simply the famous last words to a novel. Ideally, the ends and endings we discuss will not be presumed and treated simply as content, but will instead help us think about our desire for (and fear of) the sense of an ending.

Abstracts, limited to 300 words, should be sent along with a c.v. to Ian Afflerbach at [email protected]

 

ON THE ROAD WITH THE MARVELOUS MRS. MAISEL

In the first season of The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel, the Amazon Prime series followed Midge Maisel’s struggle to discover and develop her comedic voice while navigating the rules (written and unwritten) of her gender, her marriage, her class, and her family.  The series also explored voice and power through the show’s other characters (both major and minor, fictional and historical), who must locate their voices within rapidly changing social and relational contexts.  In its second season, the series expands this exploration of voice, as the characters move into unfamiliar physical and social spaces (Paris, the Catskills, the Rockaways, the telethon, the comedy circuit, the New York art scene).  These new spaces inspire or illuminate complexity in the characters’ voice and language.  This panel welcomes submissions on any aspect of voice in The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel.  Possibilities include, but are not limited to, feminist or activist voices, women’s comedic voice, subversive humor, obscenity, the expression of masculinity, the relationship between voice and physical or social space, voice and nostalgia, voice and ethnicity, Jewish humor, queer voice/voicing, or the relationship between voice and technology.   Proposals addressing the interplay between language and power/identity/relationships are especially welcome. By May 31, please submit an abstract of not more than 300 words, a brief bio, and any A/V requests to Angela Ridinger-Dotterman, Queensborough Community College, CUNY, at [email protected].

 

 

PEDAGOGY OF THE LITERATURE CLASSROOM: THE POWER OF LANGUAGE

PEDAGOGY OF THE LITERATURE CLASSROOM

SAMLA’s conference theme Languages: Power, Identity, Relationships calls for us to explore the power and impact of language. This panel looks to examine language, specifically considering pedagogical approaches to teaching various aspects of language and the power of language in literature classes, from introductory survey classes to comprehensive seminars. 
Topics include, but are not limited, to the following: 

  • Teaching how language forms identity in literature
  • Examining the role of literature and language to form personal relationships
  • Considering literature as an avenue for the study of language’s power 
  • Identifying literature that uses language to build and limit relationships 
  • Exploring the impact of current pedagogical trends on the teaching of language and literature (i.e. the flipped classroom, distance learning)
  • Creating identity through various critical lenses, such as Marxist criticism, psychoanalysis, and poetics 
  • Incorporating interdisciplinary approaches to teach the connection of literature and language
  • Applying the language of literary works to current political rhetoric 

Submit 200-250 word abstracts to [email protected]by April 10. Please include any A/V requests. SAMLA 91 will be Nov 8-10, 2019 in Atlanta. All panelists must be SAMLA members before the registration deadline. Presentations should be in English but work on language traditions is welcome. 

 

THE POWER OF PERFORMING AND VISUAL ARTWORKS IN AFRO-HISPANOPHONE/LUSOPHONE CULTURE

African dance, theater, music as well as photography, paintings, handcrafts and so on are powerful tools of expression of African(s) culture(s) within its continent and in the continuous movement through past and present diaspora and/or migration. With a specific focus on performing and visual arts, as a form of knowledge and narration of local and global realities, this session seeks to explore how Afro-Hispanophone/Lusophone artists in Europe, Latin America, USA and Africa express the essence of their traditions and their identity. An interdisciplinary or comparative approach is also encouraged.  Please send a 200-word abstract in English, Spanish or Portuguese by May 31, 2019 along with a short bio and A/V requirements to Stefania Licata: [email protected]

 

 

THE POWER OF THE IMAGE: SPANISH HISTORY THROUGH FILM

 Many critics have written about the role of memory in the definition or construction of identities. This panel will explore the reconstruction of the Spanish past as depicted in film and TV series. Papers will address the relationship between history, memory, gender, fiction and identity in Spain. Papers might also consider how films and TV series redefine historical, cultural, or personal memory or how they might utilize filmic discourse to present a more powerful reconstruction of the past. This panel will discuss the sociological, cultural and political forces that have inspired recent audiovisual productions. 

Presentations should be in English or Spanish. Please submit a 250-word abstract, current bio, and A/V requests by May 15, 2019 to Ana Corbalán at [email protected].
THE REPRESENTATION OF POWER AND AUTHORITY IN ITALIAN AND/OR SPANISH CINEMA
This panel welcomes papers on representations of power and authority in Italian and/or Spanish cinema. Of special interest are papers that interpret the role of aesthetical and/or technical practice that help portray hierarchical and symbolic relationships of power and authority. 200-word abstracts may be submitted in English, Italian, and Spanish by June 13th, 2019, to Ivano Fulgaro, The University of Alabama, at [email protected]. Please also include a brief bio, academic affiliation, and any A/V requirements in your abstract.

SHIRLEY JACKSON: POWER, IDENTITY, RELATIONSHIPS

With the recent film and television adaptations of The Haunting of Hill House and We Have Always Lived in the Castle, as well as the 2010 Library of America edition of her work, there is renewed popular and scholarly interest in Shirley Jackson and her Gothic feminist treatment of power (often expressed through control of language), identity (usually unstable or enforced by violence), and relationships (among family members and between outcasts and the communities than shun them) in mid-twentieth-century American culture. This panel welcomes submissions on any aspect of the work of Shirley Jackson, especially those in line with the conference theme.

By May 1, 2019, please submit an abstract of up to 250 words, a brief biography, and any A/V requests to Dr. Hugh Davis, Piedmont College, at [email protected].

 

A SOUTH CHRIST-HAUNTED: FAITH AND DOUBT IN SOUTHERN LITERATURE

One need only look back to H.L. Mencken’s infamous 1917 description of the American South as “a cesspool of Baptists, a miasma of Methodists, snake-charmers, phony real estate operators, and syphilitic evangelists” to note how the region’s proclivity towards religiosity has been perceived and reported. It remains nearly impossible, even in the 21stcentury, to disassociate the American South from its religious underpinnings. As Lee Ramsey points out in his book Preachers and Misfits, Prophets and Thieves, “When you read just about any piece of Southern fiction written over the past one hundred years, there is at least half a chance that you will find a minister tucked somewhere within its pages.” The impact of faith and religion upon Southern literature cannot be overstated, leading to Flannery O’Connor’s famous (and perhaps overused) proclamation that the South remains “Christ-haunted.”

This panel seeks topics that explore religion and the character of the preacher in Southern literature, focusing on the role the minister plays in his community, as well as the corrupting influence of power and the everlasting beliefs that drive these characters toward their respective ends. This panel specifically welcomes proposals which directly or indirectly address the role of the preacher figure in particular, though any paper topic revolving around faith and doubt in Southern literature will be considered. 

Please send 300-word abstracts to Joe Seale, University of Georgia, at [email protected]by June 14, 2019. Please also include a brief bio and any A/V requirements along with your abstract.

 

STORIES OF INDIANNESS: "GOOD" INDIANS, "BAD" INDIANS

This panel welcomes submissions on any aspect of narrative bodies that challenge Native and Eurowestern notions of indigeneity, to include genre conventions and misconceptions of authenticity exploring the subversive power of problem(atic) representation on issues both personal and political. 

Please submit an up to 250-words abstract, brief bio (to include academic affiliation and contact information), and A/V requests to Dr. Maria Orban, Fayetteville State University, at [email protected] by June 15th, 2019.

 

TEACHING DIFFERENCE 

As educators, we have a unique privilege and responsibility to teach our students skills beyond our course content, including empathy, tolerance, and curiosity. As world language educators, we are perfectly suited to teach our students about the incredible variation in the world, and the validity of all kinds of expression. This roundtable session welcomes submission on any aspect of teaching difference through the language classroom. By June 1st, 2019, please submit an abstract of 250 words and any A/V requirements to Rachel Perry, Auburn University, at [email protected].

 

TOLKIEN: "TELL ME A STORY IN ANY LANGUAGE YOU WANT"

In the new biopic film, Tolkien, starring Nicholas Hoult and Lily Collins, young Tolkien tells Edith Bratt that he has always been fascinated in language and that he created his own. His future wife encourages him: “Tell me a story in any language you want.” It is well known among Tolkien Studies scholars and casual readers alike how invested Tolkien was in his languages. For him, the language and the history of the world came before the story. The Elvish language, for instance, is actually made up of over 15 different languages and dialects, which he began working on when he was just a teenager. Within his lore, there are dozens of runes and scripts and grammatical rules for races like Hobbits, Dwarves, Ents, Orcs, and so many more that make each dialect unique. His love of language was not just limited to fiction—he knew over 35 languages, and among his favorite were Finnish and Welsh and Old Norse. His translation work for his favorite work, Beowulf, is noted among his other interests in Old English. To that end, this panel seeks work that explores the lasting impressions of Tolkien’s projects, whether it covers classic Tolkien texts like The Hobbit or The Lord of the Rings, more obscure texts like The Silmarillion and The Children of Hurin, or more miscellaneous projects like his interpretations, histories, art, short stories, and poetry. Work that analyzes Tolkien’s effect on pop culture, politics, and sociology is also welcome, as is work that incorporates the personal influence and/or texts of his close friend, C.S. Lewis.

By May 25, 2019, please submit a 200-300 word abstract to Bryana Fern with the University of Southern Mississippi at [email protected]. Within your abstract, please include a short bio, along with any A/V requirements.

 

TRANSLATING ITALIAN DIALECTS: ISSUES, STRATEGIES, AND SOLUTIONS ACROSS LANGUAGES

Dialects are a major component of Italian linguistic richness, which depict a specific community with its own history, customs and habits, and which profoundly varies from the North to the South. The peculiarity of Italian linguistic history is its resistance towards its linguistic uniformity, imposed after the unification of the Country in the second half of the 19th century, which however is still far from being a reality today. In fact, the relationship between dialects and Standard Italian results into a form of bilingualism and diglossia. These phenomena happen when the use of dialect in an informal context takes place opposed to the use of Standard Italian in a formal one within the same community of speakers. 

The already challenging relationship between dialects and Standard Italian gets complicated even more when it comes to translate these into other languages. Dialects represent the way to express the cultural roots of a community and for this reason they must be preserved over the years. 

Dialects are a sort of linguistic identity card and it is not so easy to find an equivalent linguistic expedient in order to portray a different community who speaks a diverse dialect. Some important traits of the target culture could be lost in translation exactly because of the lack of words in the target language. 

Indeed, there are many translation techniques and theories exploring the various strategies to translate dialects into other languages, including the use of dialects familiar to the target language, omission, or the invention of a sort of “new language.” 

This panel aims to investigate the role that dialects play in the linguistic panorama of Italian literature and cinema, with a special emphasis on their translation into other languages. 

Please, send a 250-words abstract, along with academic affiliation and A/V requirements to Federico Tiberini ([email protected]) by June 12, 2019.

 

VISUAL AND TEXTUAL ART: NEGOTIATIONS OF POWER, IDENTITY, AND RELATIONSHIPS 
POPULAR CULTURE AND FILM

Considering the conference theme “Language: Power, Identity, Relationships,” our session welcomes submissions on the topics of Relational Aesthetics, the alter-modern, or on any art/text interface involving “meaning-making” through the contextual exploration and perception of texts and symbols. This might include looking at the way texts encourage, among other things, certain unveiling processes which potentially lie in back of subjective perceptions of “other.” Any considerations of how a text can have multiple simultaneous meanings or any consideration of how visual art interfaces with textual intentions or receptions are especially welcome as are any submissions touching on aspects of power, identity or relationships in the intersection, broadly construed, of visual and textual art.  Please send abstracts of about 150 words by June 11th to [email protected].

 

VOICE, IDENTITY AND CONFIDENCE IN WRITING: WAC STRATEGIES THAT WORK 

This panel welcomes presentations that examine effective strategies for building writing confidence, voice, and identity in writing intensive courses or Writing Across Discipline courses. The panel is particularly interested in strategies used by teachers of courses other than first year composition itself but that are possibly transferable to the FY composition classroom. Interactive presentations are a plus! 

Please submit a 300-word abstract, by March 29, 2019 along with presenter's academic affiliation, contact information, as well as a short biography and A/V requirements to Josef Vice of Purdue University Global at [email protected].

 

VOICES AND NARRATIVES OF MIGRATION: MOVEMENTS AND CROSSINGS FROM LATIN AMERICA TO UNITED STATES

UNDERGRADUATE PANEL

Movements and crossings from Latin America to United States has always been a central topic in the political agenda of both countries. The Honduras Caravan is one of the recent movement heading towards USA that allows us to rethink about this topic. This session focuses on the relationships between USA and Latin America to seek to understand how people of Latin America have been represented in USA by the media (and in any cultural production) and how their voices and narratives have been (in-)visibilized. This session welcomes any cultural production embedding but not limited to literature, poetry, films and media, artifacts, photography, plays and more but an interdisciplinary approach is also encouraged. A comparative approach is especially welcome with other nationalities/cultures involved with the theme or through different cultural productions or disciplines. 
 
The presentations may include but are not limited to the following topics: 
-United States and Honduras Caravan Latino/a and United States
-Media and Migration
-Globalization and Migration 
-Power and Migration
-Politics and Migration 
-Migration and Gender Studies 
-Art and Migration 
Please send a 150-200 words abstract in English, Spanish or Portuguese by May 31, 2019 along with a short bio and A/V requirements to Dr. Stefania Licata: [email protected]

 

WALKER PERCY

Papers for this session may focus on any aspect of Walker Percy’s life and works, either fiction or non-fiction. Especially welcome are topics relevant to the SAMLA 91 conference theme: “Languages: Power, Identity, Relationships.” For Percy, the human capacity for language and for naming gives us our identity and is only possible through relationships of intersubjectivity. Percy wrote extensively on language, creating his “radical anthropology” based on his unique semiotic, with these themes pervasive in his novels. Please send 300-word abstracts by May 15, 2019, to Dr. Karey Perkins, Institute for Studies in Pragmaticism, [email protected]. Please also include a brief bio and any A/V requirements in your abstract.

 

WALKER PERCY AND WENDELL BERRY: PATTERNS OF IDENTITY AND RELATIONSHIP

This panel welcomes abstracts on the works of Walker Percy, novels and essays, and Wendell Berry, novels, essays, or poetry. Proposals may address the SAMLA 91 theme, "Languages: Identity, Relationships, Power," but all topics are considered. By May 15, 2019, please submit a 250-word abstract, brief biographical statement (inclusive of academic affiliation and contact information), and A/V requirements to Stephen Whited, Piedmont College, at  [email protected]. 

 

WHAT IF HILARY HAD WON? A UCHRONIC EXPLORATION OF THE ALTERNATE HISTORY GENRE

What if Islam dominated the globe? What if Japan conquered Australia? What if the Martin Luther King, Jr. had survived assassination? What if the South won the American Civil War? What if the Nazis had won World War Two? Indeed: what if Hillary had won? 

This panel will discuss the Uchronic genre as it pertains to alternate history narratives, particularly those focused on Asia, Australia, India, Africa, the Middle East and Latin America . This panel invites papers that address issues such as what is an alternate history narrative? What is meant by the term “Uchronic”? How are alternate history novels different from dystopian/utopian novels, fantasy or science fiction? How do prominent examples of the genre such as Lion’s Blood and Zulu Heart by Stephen Barnes, Abdourahman Waberi’s French novel In the United States of Africa,It Can’t Happen Hereby Sinclair Lewis, Philip Roth’s The Plot Against Americaor Michael Chabon’s The Yiddish Policemen’s Unionrelate to and intersect with the modern political climate and/or inform our understanding of the Uchronic alternate history genre.

Papers that address the titular question – What if Hillary had won? – or any others issues or themes related to Uchronic alternate history narratives and counterfactual essays are sought after, as well as critiques and analysis of page-to-screen adaptations of alternate history narratives such as Philip K. Dick’s The Man in the High Castle, Len Deighton’s SS-GBand Robert Harris’ Fatherland. Of particular interest are papers that address alternate history Uchronic narratives focused on Africa, Asia, Australia, the Middle East and/or Latin America, and/or on Muslim-centric worlds. Papers and presentations that discuss issues beyond alternate histories of the American Civil War and World War Two are especially encouraged.

Please submit a 300-500 word abstract, a brief bio and/or resume or CV, as well as A/V requirements by June 1st, 2019, to Dr. David C. Muller at Georgia Southern University: [email protected].